RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 04/ 2021

  1. Global Responsible Tourism Awards Launched
  2. Aviation, Time for a Step Change to Decarbonise
  3. Covid part of the new normal 
  4. Climate Change
  5. Responsble Tourism at WTM Africa
  6. Consumer Trends
  7. 20 years of Responsible Travel
  8. Overtourism post-Covid, the challenge of staycations
  9. 100% Pure New Zealand
  10. Miscellany 

The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of June
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25th May 09:00 to 12:00 GMT  there is the founding online event of a new initiative to RESET Tourism. Reviewing sustainability in tourism and tourism destination development. Making sure your offer is Good for People Planet and Place, and that your guests and tourists know. more

1. Global Responsible Tourism Awards Launched
In 2021, for the first time, we are launching Global Awards for each category – selected from the Gold winners in each of the regions. There will be Gold and Silver awards in each of the four regions, and the judges’ may also identify ‘ones to watch’. The judges can only choose from amongst those that apply. You can nominate others or your own business, destination, or organisation on the awards page here. Those businesses, destinations and organisations which win Gold in the four regional awards in Africa, India, Latin America, and the Rest of the World will automatically be entered into the Global Awards. There will be regional panels of judges and the global judging will be done by a panel drawn from the regional panels. All the panels will be chaired by Harold Goodwin, WTM’s Responsible Tourism Advisor, to ensure that the same processes are followed rigorously in all panels. They are free to enter.  Categories: 1) Decarbonising Travel & Tourism, 2) Sustaining Employees and Communities through the Pandemic, 3) Destinations Building Back Better Post-COVID, 4) Increasing Diversity in Tourism: How inclusive is our industry?, 5) Reducing Plastic Waste in the Environment and 60 Growing the Local Economic Benefit. The Awards close 31 August 2021. Apply & Nominate here.

 

2. Aviation, Time for a Step Change to Decarbonise
In March 2020, the respected German consultancy Roland Berger forecast that if other industries decarbonise in line with current projections, aviation could account for up to 24% of global emissions by 2050 unless there is a significant technological shift. Airlines, highly influential in the International Civil Aviation Organization, have sought to continue with Business as Usual and initially passed responsibility to their consumers to offset their emissions voluntarily. Carbon offsets are popular with some in the aviation sector because responsibility passes to the end consumer and removes any pressure for the aircraft manufacturer or the airline to reduce their emissions. And they are very cheap – too cheap. If offsets tempt you, look at the scientific arguments against them. 10 myths about net-zero targets and carbon offsetting, busted.
The aviation industry is the travel and tourism sector’s Achilles’ heel. Tour operators, tourism authorities, and destinations need to demand that air transport providers remove carbon and other climate-harming emissions, not just to claim green credentials but to assure the industry’s future.

Flying is not the problem, its greenhouse gas emissions are the problem. Some new companies are developing planes that do not rely on fossil fuels and Airbus‘s ambition is to create the world’s first zero-emission commercial aircraft by 2035. Decarbonising aviation is vital to the future of the travel and tourism sector. The aviation sector needs to decarbonise itself, and it is demonstrably failing to make progress fast enough. This failure jeopardises the future of travel and tourism for the outbound industry and destinations. COP26 is the opportunity for aviation to be brought under the control of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change UNFCCC.

The longer the aviation industry delays taking effective scalable action the bigger the crisis will be when governments act to curtail emissions. The aviation sector is now behind others in addressing climate change and their preferred solutions, carbon offsettingSustainable Aviation Fuels, and net-zero, have significant weaknesses and are not credibly scalable.
WTM, as part of its Platform for Change, has published Time for Effective Action to Remove Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation.

The Guardian, Can the aviation industry really go carbon neutral by 2050? has reported on an investigation conducted with  Unearthed, Greenpeace’s investigative arm, found that although many forest projects were doing valuable conservation work, the credits that they generated by preventing environmental destruction appear to be based on a flawed and much-criticised system, even though these credits were being used to back up claims of “carbon-neutral flying” and net-zero commitments.

3. Covid: part of the new normal 
The World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) and the International Air Transport Association (IATA) announce a Destination Tracker in preparation for the restart of international travel. The tracker available on both UNWTO and IATA's websites will have information about infection rates, positivity rates, and vaccination roll out by destination/country;  test and quarantine requirements; and Destination Measures, including general health and safety requirements such as the use of masks, transit through a country, curfew, or regulations related to restaurants and attractions, provided by national tourism organizations.

The John Hopkins Corona Virus Resource Centre data demonstrates the overall toll of coronavirus on a country over time.

Their cumulative cases by date plotted as confirmed cases per 100,000 population demonstrates that Covid-19 remains a major global challenge.

A recent IATA survey, reports that 72% of people want to travel to see family and friends as soon as possible.

The European Parliament has urged the rapid restoration of free movement in the EU as one of the pillars of the single market enshrined in the European treaties. A new name, “EU COVID-19 Certificate” has been agreed to make it clearer to EU citizens and also limit the certificates’ use to during the pandemic. more

4. Climate Change
Climate scientists: concept of net-zero is a dangerous trap

"... the idea of net zero has licensed a recklessly cavalier “burn now, pay later” approach which has seen carbon emissions continue to soar. .... by 2009 it was becoming increasingly clear that it would not be possible to make even the gradual reductions that policymakers demanded. That was the case even if carbon capture and storage was up and running. The amount of carbon dioxide that was being pumped into the air each year meant humanity was rapidly running out of time.
Current net zero policies will not keep warming to within 1.5°C because they were never intended to. They were and still are driven by a need to protect business as usual, not the climate. If we want to keep people safe then large and sustained cuts to carbon emissions need to happen now. That is the very simple acid test that must be applied to all climate policies. The time for wishful thinking is over." Research scientists Dyke, Watson and Knorr 

BBC Weather's Ben Rich explores the impact of coronavirus on the global climate.
French legislators have voted in favour of legislation that will ban domestic flight services that trains are able to cover in less than two-and-a-half hours. The French government has provided a bailout for Air France which for EU approval will require that it relinquishes some slots at Orly Airport 
Canada's Edmonton International has signed The Climate Pledge which it plans to achieve by switching to green electricity and recuign consumption.

5. Responsble Tourism at WTM Africa
We can learn much about tourism in and from Africa – celebrating diversity and inclusiveness, growing the cake to create more value for neighbouring communities, living with and benefitting from biodiversity (some of it dangerous), and the importance of transparency. One of the few benefits of a virtual programme is that we can have speakers from around the world on the panels at WTM Africa and that they can be shared worldwide.
WTM Africa's Responsible Tourism programme this year was virtual with very international panels and all of it recorded and available free online.
Leaders discussed Progress in Responsible Tourism and the role of certification more, and there is an interview with Lisa Scriven about Fair Trade Tourism. The question Tourism and Biodiversity, Friend or Foe? was discussed and experts from across Africa, and Rupesh Kumar from India, shared their experience in creating more value for local communities moreThe cultural diversity of Africa is undervalued by the tourism industry at WTM Africa this year we addressed the question Whose diversity is it? and there was a discussion about Storytelling. All the videos from WTM Africa are available here 

6. Consumer Trends
Booking.com's latest report is entitled: Impact awakening: the rise of responsible travel

Booking.com
commissioned research and conducted among a sample of adults who have travelled for business or leisure in the past 12 months, and must be planning to travel in the next 12 months (if/once travel restrictions are lifted). In total 20,934 respondents across 28 countries were polled. 53% said that they were looking for more sustainable ways to travel; to avoid travelling during peak season (51%), overcrowding (48%) and overly busy tourist attractions (63%). More than half (53%) of global travellers are willing to reduce their waste and recycle their plastic when travelling, I want to travel more sustainably because COVID-19 has opened my eyes to humans’ impact on the environment. Ranging from 74% in Colombia and 27% in the Netherlands.I expect the travel industry to offer more sustainable travel options. Ranging from Colombia 86% to Denmark 47% 
WTTC reports that in 2019, the Travel & Tourism sector contributed 10.4% to global GDPa share that decreased to 5.5% in 2020 due to ongoing restrictions to mobility. Domestic visitor spending decreased by 45%, while international visitor spending declined by an unprecedented 69.4%.

The Yorkshire Dales National Park visitor survey 2020 revealed some significant changes in visitors. Visitors came mainly from urban areas on the edge of the National Park. There was a rise in the number of first-time visitors with 20% saying their first-ever visit to the Dales was in 2020 (14% in 2017). It has also shown an increase in younger people, and people from different ethnic backgrounds visiting.

The 2020 report released by Statistics South Africa, reveals that foreign arrivals dropped by 71% from just over 15, 8million in 2019 to less than 5 million in 2020. It is evident that the COVID-19 pandemic impacted the tourism industry quite hard around the world and in South Africa, mainly due to the lockdown and travel restrictions that were imposed.

7. 20 years of Responsible Travel
In April Responsible Travel celebrated twenty years of Responsible Travel, a company I co-founded with Justin Francis. From the outset, it was an activist company wanting to demonstrate that there was a market for Responsible Travel. It was, and is, a simple concept: better holidays for consumers, better for communities in destinations and better for the environment and nature.

At the heart of Responsible Travel and Responsible Tourism is the principle that better places to live are better places to visit – in that order. Back in 2001, when we launched the company, many were sceptical and expected the company to fail. It didn’t. It has grown and has generated profits. Responsible Travel has proven that it was possible, in travel and tourism, to be responsible and to be profitable. more Justin Francis has published his reflections on the first two decades. Responsible Travel: How sustainable tourism has changed over the past 20 years  I sold my shares and ceased to be a director well over a decade ago, recognising that this financial interest conflicted with my academic and consultancy work.

8. Overtourism post-Covid, the challenge of staycations
Staycation is now used with two different meanings, originally coined to refer to day trips from home it is now widely used to refer to domestic tourism. VisitScotland is encouraging staycations, slow travel, eco-holidays, wellbeing and wellness, and nature-based experiences. They are also promoting workcations, "if you can work from home you can work from anywhere now."

In common with many other national tourism offices, VisitBritain is encouraging domestic tourism, inspiring consumers to book a short break. Visit England has produced a series of cartoons to encourage more responsible behaviour, I have not seen any being used yet. more


Scotland In early April with lockdown rules in place, the police were able to "move on" and disperse people planning to wild camp at a popular beauty spot, Mennock Pass, but 'stay local' rules were lifted on April 26 when managing wild camping will become much more difficult.  Increased numbers of wild campers travelling by car and motorhomes are expected as lockdown restrictions are lifted.

VisitScotland has brought together local authorities, Police Scotland, Nature Scot and many others, to develop plans for new infrastructure and to coordinate a whole package of visitor messaging being targeted at potential visitors. the Highland Tourism Partnership (HTP), whose priorities include "delivering a world-class customer experience" and marketing the region as a responsible tourism destination. The HTP comprises the  North Coast 500 Ltd, VisitScotland, Highland Council, NatureScot, Wester Ross Tourism, Venture North, Visit Inverness Loch Ness, Cairngorms Business Partnership, Visit Moray Speyside, SkyeConnect and Lochaber Outdoor Capital of the UK, representing more than 2000 Highland businesses from across all sectors involved in tourism – including hotels, B&Bs, visitor attractions, guided tours and food-and-drink providers. Local communities are at the heart of HTP's approach to "looking after and developing the Highlands for the long-term sustainable benefit of our special area and its people".

Chris Taylor, has explained that VisitScotland wants "to inspire Scots to travel responsibly once current restrictions ease; encourage them to tread lightly in the places they visit and educate visitors on responsible actions to ensure tourism remains a sustainable industry, well into the future." There is significant investment in countryside rangers, new parking, visitor interpretation, upgraded and accessible toilets and new facilities to help manage motorhomes. A holiday voucher scheme will be created to support a more socially sustainable and inclusive tourism industry. In Ireland, RTE published advice for their listeners, with the government continuing to advise against international travel, it is inevitable that this summer will see an internal migration en masse to our coasts. It is a good time to think about how we might staycation in a more responsible manner this summer. Be friendly with the locals ¦ Be considerate of nature ¦ Be safe ¦ Spread the load ¦ Sound intelligent to your friends: maybe avail of those locally-led biodiversity walks and events, take time to read the heritage boards, or simply chat with the locals over the hedge. "It doesn’t hurt to be friendly, kind and considerate to both your hosts: Nature and communities." Kevin Lynch NUI Galway Revenge Travel and the Hunt for Responsible Tourists 

In the Lake District campers leave behind tents, empty bottles and sleeping bags. At Thirlmere the Lakes Plastic Collective removed 13 bin bags of rubbish. A 'motorhome code of conduct' has been introduced in the Lake District. Demand for motorhomes soared during the pandemic. The new code, set out on the Visit Lake District website, asks visitors to plan their route and respect their surroundings: "most of all, think like a local, We are asking visitors to value and support our local communities and take the opportunity to explore them, using local farm shops and eateries and, when safe, visiting attractions." More than 250,000 walkers trek up Scafell Pike (978m)  every year, more are expected post-lockdown as people holiday at home and take staycations. A helicopter has been used to take a digger up the side of Scafell Pike, to help National Trust rangers and Fix the Fells repair damage to one of the main routes to the top.

Even during the Covid pandemic the fact that tourism is a polluting industry has been obvious. Tim Farron, the Liberal Democrat MP for Westmorland and Lonsdale, says: “What residents saw here in the Lakes and the Dales the last time the ‘stay at home’ message was relaxed last Summer was absolute carnage. “Inconsiderate parking led to chaos on the roads and on some occasions, emergency service vehicles were unable to get passed. Litter and dog mess was left to clutter up paths and pavements. Farm gates were left open, fires and BBQs led to damage to the local wildlife, and the household water supply polluted. There were people camping overnight playing loud music into the early hours and other anti-social behaviour.

9. 100% Pure New Zealand
Navigating the future of tourism (David Simmons)  for the long haul, carbon proofing NZ tourism (Susanne Becken) and improving national park management (Dave Bamford). In 100% Pure Future – New Zealand Tourism Renewed (published November 2020), nine writers outline their visions for sustainable tourism that puts the environment first and creates more meaningful exchanges between visitors and their hosts. Four contributors share their thoughts in this webinar.

10 Miscellany

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Responsible Traveller, South Africa
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RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 03/ 2021

  1. One year on living with Covid- the new normal?
  2. Multilateral action is required to rebuild trust and travel
  3. The world's most sustainable destinations 
  4. WTM Africa Virtual 7, 8, 9 April
  5. Building Back Better? Regenerative Tourism?
  6. Biodiversity the world's most dangerous animal can make a difference. 
  7. Decarbonising travel & tourism: Hydrogen 
  8. Scotland adopts Responsible Tourism 
  9. Changing perceptions of ourselves and others. 
  10. Miscellany 

The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of May
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.

  1. One Year On Living with Covid- the new normal?

XinhuaNet
As Coronavirus deaths in the UK approach 145,000, bereaved families have begun painting a vast memorial wall in an “outpouring of love” opposite the Houses of Parliament. The wall mural will stretch to nearly half a kilometre along the Embankment opposite Parliament. more

John Hopkins has now recorded close 140m cases and 2.85m deaths this pandemic is far from over. Countries will continue to move in and out of lockdown and new 'variants of concern' which may result in changes in transmissibility, clinical presentation and severity, or impact public health and social measures (PHSM). more

Source: Visual Capitalist
As Covid-19 is spread by social contact travel and tourism, domestically and internationally, is inevitably going to be subject to restrictions within countries and across borders. There are reports of an EU Vaccine Passport by  June 15th, designed to save the summer tourism season.  Everything you need to know about the proposal Digital Green Certificate.
In a trial project, SimplyGo (which enables travellers to pay using contactless), has partnered with SITA to make use of SITA Health Protect.  It looks likely that there are going to be multiple schemes. Vaccine nationalism has arisen, world leaders have called for an international pandemic treaty to build cross-border cooperation.  "The Covid-19 pandemic has been a stark and painful reminder that nobody is safe until everyone is safe." Vaccine Apartheid threatens us all.

As the Visual Capitalist's graphic of the first year of the pandemic shows it is far from over. Take a look at the original

Dutch travel company Sunweb has announced that it plans to take 187 people for an eight-day holiday in Greece, to see whether tourism is feasible, despite the rise in contagion cases in several European countries. Participants will not be allowed to leave the resort and will have to quarantine for up to 10 days when they return to the Netherlands.

In 2009, after the financial crisis, international tourism declined by 4% in 2020 numbers dropped by 73.9%.  more

2. Multilateral action is required to rebuild trust and travel
As Taleb Rifai has pointed out for travel and tourism to recover "we need is a new multilateral system, a more harmonized, fair, and equitable system, because it’s not important how successful every country is on its own. If one cannot travel from one place to another, what countries do independently is of no consequence. This is the nature of travel. It connects people and places." “We have to function as one. We cannot have one country insisting on quarantine, while its neighbours are demanding a vaccination passport, and a third country is requiring simply a 72-hour testing proof before arrival. ..... We need to rebuild a new multilateral system from the bottom up, brick by brick. We need to build a system that does not depend on the principles of the haves and the have nots." more

Zurab Pololikashvili, Taleb's successor as UNWTO Secretary-General, recognising that:  "We can only restart tourism if we restore trust in travel. People want to feel safe and looked after when they travel," has begun work on an International Code for the Protection of Tourists. The first two chapters on definitions and seven core principles have been agreed upon. The code has been drawn up by representatives of over 100 countries, the European Commission, UN agencies, IATA and a range of other travel industry associations. It is difficult to permit tourism when a virus spread by contact between people is prevalent and particularly so when new variants of concern emerge, health trumps travel for government and most tourists.

3. The world's most sustainable destinations 
Caroline Bremner, Head of Travel Research. at Euromonitor talks about their new sustainable destinations work. Euromonitor's Consumer Lifestyles survey in January 2021 found that 66% of consumers, that is a global average, want to have a positive impact on the environment through their daily actions.
Euromonitor looked at 99 countries through the lens of environmental, social and economic sustainability, country risk as well as sustainable tourism demand, transport and lodging and used 57 data indicators to determine their comparative performance.
 

Harold Goodwin discusses the research findings with Caroline.

4. WTM Africa Virtual 7, 8, 9 April
We can learn much about tourism in and from Africa – celebrating diversity and inclusiveness, growing the cake to create more value for neighbouring communities, living with and benefitting from biodiversity (some of it dangerous), and the importance of transparency. One of the few benefits of a virtual programme is that we can have speakers from around the world on the panels at WTM Africa and that they can be shared worldwide.

There are six Responsible Tourism panels at WTM Africa this year focussed on progress in RT, certification, biodiversity, how  tourism creates more value for local communities,  and  cultural diversity and storytelling

The Responsible Tourism programme at WTM Africa can be accessed here   You can register for the event here

5. Building Back Better? Regenerative Tourism?

There is much talk of regenerative tourism the latest buzzword, an alternative to build back better and to be welcomed for that. However, like so many labels that come and go, and  it remains largely aspirational. What is needed is action, people taking responsibility to make the changes essential to a healthy travel and tourism sector and healthy peoples on a healthy planet.

6. Biodiversity the world's most dangerous animal can make a difference. 

7. Decarbonising travel & tourism: Hydrogen 

8. Scotland adopts Responsible Tourism
In November 2020 Visit Scotland, along with Wild Scotland and Sail Scotland, declared a climate emergency, the first national tourism organisation to do so. In April 2019, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon declared a climate emergency on behalf of the Scottish Government, the first time this had happened at a national level anywhere in the world. VisitScotland has now launched #RespectProtectEnjoy Scotland and Scotland's Responsible Tourism Promise, designed for those visiting or holidaying in Scotland it aims to keep Scotland special. The focus is on what the visitor can do to avoid disturbing wildlife or damaging the environment, to respect the locals and their resources, shop local and avoid crowded places and come back when it's less busy.

The campaign has received widespread support in local news media for its £124,000 campaign. The Inverness Courier reported that the  "campaign will ask visitors to leave no trace as it looks to counteract some of the issues seen as a result of a new, homegrown audience of visitors discovering and enjoying Scotland’s countryside.

9. Changing perceptions of ourselves and others.

10. Miscellany

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

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RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 02/ 2021

  1. The Critical Decade: we are in clear and present danger
  2. Climate Change is a Cumulative Problem 
  3. Biodiversity Loss is Bad For Us Too
  4. Covid-19 will be part of the new normal
  5. Resilience and Responsibility 
  6. Perfect Storm: Climate Change and Tourism
  7. International Women's Day
  8. OECD Manual: Sustainable & Inclusive Tourism
  9. 2021 India Responsible Tourism Awards & Ethical Travel Awards
  10. Miscellany 


The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of April

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  1. The Critical Decade - we are in clear and present danger
    Tom Clancy popularised the phrase "clear and present danger" when he used it for his 1989 political thriller. It was the US Supreme Court Justice Holmes who formulated the “clear and present danger” test in a case heard in 1925 asserting that it is a "question of proximity and degree." It was back in February 2010, over a decade ago,  that UN Secretary-General told the UN Environment Programme’s Governing Council and Global Ministerial Environment Forum that that "climate change is a clear and present danger."  In 1972 the Club of Rome published Limits to Growth which used a computer simulation to forecast the consequences of the exponential economic and population growth with a finite supply of resources.In 2016, a report published by the UK All-Party Parliamentary Group on Limits to Growth concluded that "there is unsettling evidence that society is still following the 'standard run' of the original study – in which overshoot leads to an eventual collapse of production and living standards". Download  There is still debate about the limits to growth, debates about individual elements of the science on climate change, biodiversity loss, resource depletion, pollution and what Kate Raworth has conceptualised as Doughnut Economics.

    We have 'known' since 1972 that although we see ourselves as having dominion over nature and our planet which we can exploit for our benefit, individually and collectively, we have known since we first saw those Apollo photographs of  Earth in 1968 that our planet is finite. It is not infinite. Urgent action is required to tackle the connected global threats of climate change and biodiversity loss, and mounting inequality. We have had decades of procrastination and prevarication. This is now the critical decade, we have delayed action for decades refusing to adopt the precautionary principle and paid lip service to sustainability.

    We face a perfect storm of threats to ecosystems, systems which we rely on for human health, welfare and prosperity. We express more concern about the scale of the financial debt burden we leave to future generations, paper debt, than we do about the real material consequences of the greenhouse gas emissions we are bequeathing our children and their children. A debt that will make human life more and more difficult to sustain.

  2. Climate Change is a Cumulative Problem
    Climate change results from the accumulation of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. The science now is irrefutable, the burning of fossil fuels since the industrial revolution has increased the quantity of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere to a level where we are changing our climate. Our pollution is changing our climate and making our planet less habitable for ourselves and many other species. We are bequeathing the consequences of our pollution to our children and their children's children. The CO2 we are putting into our atmosphere now will take generations to be removed by natural processes. Getting to zero carbon emissions by 2050 is not the point. We need to cut now the number of greenhouse gases we are putting into the atmosphere.

    The UK track recorded reveals the scale of the problem. In the 2008 Climate Change Act, the UK Pledged to cut net emissions by 80% by 2050. The Act established the Climate Change Committee (CCC) as an independent, statutory body. Back in December 2020 it published its Sith Carbon Budget for the period 2033 to 2037. Meeting the Budget’s requirements will require a cut of 78% in emissions by 2035. All new cars, vans and replacement boilers to be zero-carbon in operation by the early 2030s. UK electricity production must then reach net-zero by 2035, in line with the National Grid ESO’s vision, and the majority of existing UK homes will need to be retrofitted in some way also.The CCC has deliberately front-loaded the targets reduce the cost of the transition, as technologies would mature sooner and investors would have the policy certainty needed to provide support at scale. more The Stern Report on the Economics of Climate Change, in 2006 a decade and a half ago, made very clear that delay increased the cost of mitigation and adaptation.As Anderson, Broderick and Stoddard  have pointed out the mitigation plans of even ‘climate progressive’ nations, in this case, the UK and Sweden, fall far short of Paris-compliant pathways given the international community’s obligations accepted under the Paris Agreement and "the small and rapidly dwindling global carbon budget."Like Covid-19 climate change kills people, although generally not “us”.In January, the UN Secretary-General reported that extreme weather and climate-related hazards had killed more than 410,000 people in the past decade, the vast majority in low and lower-middle-income countries. A paper last month in Science Advances reports that vulnerabilities are seen across human and natural systems, including both wealthy and poor communities, and both terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and a higher probability of extreme weather events many in areas with large human populations, high human vulnerability, and/or high biodiversity.It is a rare thing for the industry to call for stronger regulation. Last month the Fuelling Flight Project which includes NGOs and major airlines (AirFrance, easyJet, Finnair, IAG & KLM) pointed to 'the risk of massive capital investments in things that increase emissions compared to fossil fuels and/or that become stranded assets’ and called for ‘future proof sustainability requirements’ higher than the ones in the European Commission’s Renewable Energy Directive including ‘clear exclusions of unsustainable feedstocks and pathways such as biofuels from dedicated cropland and PFAD [Palm Fatty Acid Distillate]’.The group, including airlines,  has called for higher sustainability standards before SAF is prioritised and ramped up. As they assert: “Competition for limited resources, particularly in relation to international transport, will not solve the global climate challenge.”

    In February David Attenborough gave a stark warning on climate change to the  UN and called for co-operative international action -sadly in a world experiencing a resurgence in nationalism.

    There is plenty of reason to be concerned. The New York Times has reviewed the scientific research being undertaken into changes in the Gulf Stream, currents swing west from Africa, ultimately influencing weather patterns from Caracas to Miami to Europe. The Gulf Stream propels the heat of the Caribbean past Cape Hatteras before bending toward the British Isles. The fear is that melting Greenland ice will tip the delicate balance of hot and cold that defines not only the North Atlantic. "Without this current — a heat pump on a planetary scale — scientists believe that great swaths of the world might look quite different."

    And some reason for optimism. The most recent  Climate Action Tracker reports that in the last few months of 2020, about 35 countries plus the EU27 submitted an updated or second Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) to the UNFCCC, unfortunately, 10 did not increase the scale of their ambition/ Insert imageJustin Rowlatt, the BBC's chief environment correspondent has expressed optimism pointing to COP26, the fact that counties including Chia are committing to more substantial cuts, the falling costs of renewables, the changes businesses are making and low-interest rates could facilitate a major drive top build back better. A fortnight earlier. Matt McGrath, Rowlatt's colleague at the BBC, filed a story with the headline "'Not enough' climate ambition shown by leaders." Things may be changing but it is too early to tell.

    BP plans to cut oil and gas production by 40pc this decade and push BP further into renewable energy, amid growing public clamour to tackle global warming. Charles de Gaulle airport has abandoned plans for a new terminal.UNDP has conducted a major international survey in 50 countries - the Peoples' Climate Vote. 64% of people said that climate change was an emergency – presenting a clear and convincing call for decision-makers to step up on ambition. Not surprisingly, The highest level of support was in SIDS (74%), followed by high-income countries (72%), middle-income countries (62%), then LDCs (58%). Making companies pay for pollution had high support in seven of twelve high-income countries, led by the United Kingdom (72%) and Canada (69%).

  3. Biodiversity Loss is Bad For Us Too
    Revenues from tourism matter to conservation
    , the Coivd-19 pandemic has demonstrated how important revenues from tourism are to the conservation of habitat and species.  Ecotourism is not good enough: We must take responsibility and distance ourselves, and our industry, from the ‘take only photographs, leave only footprints’ ethic. Tourism needs to put resources into conservation and benefit local communities to recompense them for the opportunity costs of living with wildlife and we need to work harder to counter the illegal trade in wildlife. moreUNEP has just published Making Peace With Nature: "A scientific blueprint to tackle the climate, biodiversity and pollution emergencies”. They argue that we must improve our relationship with nature, understanding its value and putting that value at the heart of our decision- making" - we need to stop being at war with nature.This is a high-level report with only five references to tourism.Costa Rica is promoting an international coalition that seeks to establish codes so that interactions between tourists and wildlife are safe and ethical. In Agra, Wildlife SOS has launched a campaign to promote responsible and cruelty-free wildlife tourism in India. Domestic cats, lions, tigers, mink, dogs and gorillas can catch Covid-19. The majority of gorilla selfies that researchers found on Instagram violated social distancing rules meant to keep the endangered great apes safe.

    In the UK some areas saw a huge increase in “wild toileting”. Cash-strapped councils, which have no obligation to provide toilets, have been shutting them for years and relying on shops, pubs and cafes to fill the gap. Closed during the pandemic the shortage of public toilets in the UK was revealed.  The Clifton Downs in Bristol have suffered heavy damage in the past year as hoards of visitors flock to the popular spot for fresh air and exercise during the pandemic. Walkers have churned up the grass and vans parked on grass verges have caused two drains to collapse. “The amount of trampling/wear and erosion to the ground has gone from being only in a few key places and at certain times of the year, to be in all parts of the Downs throughout the year.

  4. Covid-19 will be part of the new normal
    Living with pandemics.
    For the future of travel and tourism, we need the world to be much better equipped to deal with pandemics as they emerge. Those countries with recent experience of epidemic diseases have generally been more successful than those which have not. We have learnt to live with and manage influenza; hopefully, we will learn to live with and manage Covid-19 too. The development of broad-based vaccines is likely critical to maintaining the open borders essential to our industry. Otherwise, we may face uncertainty with periodic panic, lockdowns and forced quarantine as a regular hazard for travellers and holidaymakers.This pandemic has revealed just how vulnerable travel and tourism is to diseases spread by people. Although it is also clear that those countries that locked down effectively and quickly had fewer deaths, the travel and tourism sector were still hit hard.With flights cancelled and travellers facing quarantine abroad or on return some become stuck overseas. UKOther nationals have been hit much harder. There are nearly 40,000 Australians stuck overseas because of government caps on international arrivals, transit-country restrictions and expensive and cancelled flights. Although the roll-out of vaccines in the richer countries is proceeding apace there is real concern about how quickly vaccines will get to poorer countries.

    On Feb 24, 2021, 600 000 doses of the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine arrived in Ghana. 2 days later, 500 000 doses of the same vaccine landed in the Ivory Coast. The West African nations are the first countries to receive the product as part of the COVAX initiative, a joint endeavour between WHO, Gavi, and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, which aims to ensure that the COVID-19 vaccines are equitably distributed around the world. Demand for the vaccines will far exceed supply this year and there are growing concerns that poorer countries will get left behind. Even if everything goes according to plan, countries relying on COVAX alone cannot expect to vaccinate more than 20% of their population. more

    In the meantime travel agents in the UK are reporting that they have clients who are still travelling despite the lockdown. In a TravelMole poll of agents, almost 35% said their clients were travelling on business but a further 30% said some clients were taking leisure trips, even though this is against the law. The UK government has tightened regulations on foreign travel. Travellers leaving the UK will have to show a  new permit proving they are travelling for essential reasons in a move to stop Easter holidays being taken abroad. In Kent, there is concern about Airbnb hosts in Canterbury, Whitstable and Herne Bay rent rooms out for illegal breaks. Images of large crowds and overflowing bins on Whitstable seafront were shared widely on social media, prompting calls for “spectacularly selfish” visitors to be stopped from flocking to the coast.

  5. Resilience and ResponsibilityWhen there is a "clear and present danger" resilience matters.

    In three decades BlackRock has evolved from an eight-person start-up to a global company trusted to manage more assets than any other investment manager delivering long-term value for the clients and shareholders. Their latest report, Sustainable investing: Resilience amid uncertainty,  reaffirms their view that: "Combining traditional investing with environmental, social, and governance-related (ESG) insights to improve[s] long-term outcomes ... Companies with strong profiles on material sustainability issues have potential to outperform those with poor profiles. In particular, ... companies managed with a focus on sustainability should be better positioned versus their less sustainable peers to weather adverse conditions while still benefiting from positive market environments."For five decades we have mouthed sustainability, paid lip service to it, some have done more and taken responsibility to develop sustainable businesses and destinations. But most have not. We cannot collectively claim that we sustainably utilised resources in a way that avoids depleting them for future generations. We have failed collectively to take responsibility to meet the challenges of climate change, biodiversity loss and mounting inequality that were foreseen by natural and social scientists, but we have failed to act. The 1987 Brundtland Report, Our Common Future, defined sustainable development refers to development that meets our current needs without hindering the ability of future generations to meet theirs.  We have substantially failed to achieve this at the system level. So now have to cope with the consequences of climate change, biodiversity loss and limits imposed on resource availability by our finite planet.

    In the UK, Sir John Bevan, the chief executive of the Environment Agency said on 23rd February speaking to the annual conference of the Association of British Insurers that: "Much more extreme weather will kill more people through drought, flooding, wildfires and heatwaves than most wars have." He went on to say "The net effects will collapse ecosystems, slash crop yields, take out the infrastructure that our civilisation depends on, and destroy the basis of the modern economy and modern society."

  6. Perfect Storm
    We hear a bewildering amount about how businesses are reducing their carbon emissions. Confusion is a powerful tool in the hands of those wanting to continue with business as usual. There has been much chatter about greenhouse gas emissions having reduced during COVID-19 lockdowns. The continuous data set collected at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, reveals that even with the impact of Covid-19 we have not dented the growth in greenhouse gas emissions, for all the talk, their scientists report that the rate of growth is accelerating.Back in December Antonio Guterres pointed to our folly: “Humanity is waging war on nature. This is suicidal. Nature always strikes back – and it is already doing so with growing force and fury. Biodiversity is collapsing. One million species are at risk of extinction. Ecosystems are disappearing before our eyes,” he said. This is the bad news. The good news is that  “Human activities are at the root of our descent toward chaos. But that means human action can help to solve it.” Last month the UN Secretary-General reported that extreme weather and climate-related hazards have killed more than 410,000 people in the past decade, the vast majority in low and lower-middle-income countries. moreThe IMF has recently published a Working Paper: Perfect Storm: Climate Change and Tourism  The IMF points out that: "While the world’s attention is on dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change remains a greater existential threat to vulnerable countries that are highly dependent on a weather-sensitive sector like tourism. The paper concludes that as "extreme weather events are becoming more frequent and severe over time,.. Caribbean countries need to pursue comprehensive adaptation policies to reduce vulnerabilities to climate change."
  7. International Women's Day
    This edition of RT News is being published on International Women's Day  This year's theme is #ChooseToChallenge, challenge brings change.  We can all choose to challenge and call out gender bias and inequality. Wildlife conservation has, until recently, been a male-dominated profession – but the landscape is beginning to change.  The International Anti-Poaching Foundation (IAPF) estimates that men outnumber women by 100:1 in front-line conservation. In Botswana, Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda women form a larger proportion of the conservation workforce and they are being promoted into leadership positions. Progress is being made but not fast enough.The Fifth Sustainable Development Goal is to "achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls". 54% of the tourism workforce worldwide is female but they are often predominantly in low-skilled or informal work. Women "have felt the economic shock to tourism caused by COVID-19 quickest and hardest. UNWTO has produced a Series of Recommendations for an Inclusive Response to ensure that women are not left behind." more  Turisme de Barcelona is launching a Women’s Itinerary through Ciutat Vella and a viral action in social media with different working women’s voices on VisitBarcelona's website to highlight the important role of women in the tourism sector promoting equal opportunities.
  8. OECD Manual: Sustainable & Inclusive Tourism
    The paper published in January focuses on five main pillars of policy solutions, and best practices, to help destinations rebuild and flourish in this dramatically changed policy
    context for tourism development. Recommended policy solutions aim to: i) rethink tourism success, ii) adopt an integrated policy-industry-community approach, iii) mainstream sustainable policies and practices, iv) develop more sustainable tourism business models, and v) implement better measurement to better manage. The report presents 9 case studies on destination strategies to support a sustainable and inclusive recovery. The 9 case studies are Austria (Ötscher-Tormäuer Nature Park), Colombia, Finland, France (Corsica), Japan (Kyoto), Mexico, New Zealand (Bay of Plenty), Spain (Benidorm) and Switzerland.
  9. 2021 India Responsible Tourism Awards & Ethical Travel Awards

    Ethical Traveller describes the purpose of their awards: "Our goal is to encourage practices and mindsets that help create a safer and more sustainable world. Our Ethical Destinations Awards are given to the 10 that have shown the greatest improvement over the past year. They must also offer unspoiled natural beauty, great outdoor activities, and the opportunity to interact with local people in a meaningful, mutually enriching way." more

The 2021 India Responsible Tourism Awards were presented in Konark, Odisha. The winners and the judges' reasons can be found on the Responsible Tourism Partnership website.

 

10: Miscellany

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

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Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

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Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
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RT NewsWTM

RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 01/ 2021

We enter 2021 confronted by four inter-connected crises, all of them global in their reach and consequences. Covid-19, climate change, biodiversity loss and mounting inequality. All of them accelerating. Tourism is a contributor to all of these crises and a victim of them. The development of vaccines and new treatments for Covid-19 and the various lockdowns and quarantine regimes have demonstrated that we can tackle crises. We have many solutions to these crises and there will be more. We now need to implement them.

"Without swift and immediate action, at an unprecedented pace and scale, we will miss the window of opportunity to 'reset' for... a more sustainable and inclusive future." Prince of Wales Terra Carta

  1. Climate Change Accelerates
  2. Coping with Covid-19
  3. The New Normal
  4. Tackling Biodiversity Loss
  5. Take Back Control - Manage Tourism, 
  6. The Kerala Approach extends to Madhya Pradesh
  7. Plastic Pollution Spreads 
  8. Responsible Tourism in Colorado, USA
  9. Brexit impacts on travel 
  10. Miscellany 

The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of February.
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.

  1. Climate Change Accelerates
    At the Climate Adaptation Summit in January, the UN Secretary-General reported that extreme weather and climate-related hazards have killed more than 410,000 people in the past decade, the vast majority in low and lower-middle-income countries. The S-G called for"a breakthrough on adaptation and resilience" and a transition to a "low-carbon, high-resilience future." He called for financial support for adaptation and resilience in the developing pointing out that: " Support for adaptation and resilience is a moral, economic and social imperative."  As he reminded us we "have the tools, skills and opportunity to deliver “more, faster and better” adaptation actions." We know what needs to be done. He concluded, "Let us live up to our responsibilities and jointly change course towards a sustainable, fair and resilient future." more
    January also saw the launch  of the Terra Carta charter r “provides a roadmap to 2030 for businesses to move towards an ambitious and sustainable future …. one that will harness the power of nature combined with the transformative power, innovation and resources of the private sector.” Based on work by a “coalition of the willing” among global business leaders, the Terra Carta, is supported by the Bank of America, Blackrock, EY, AstraZeneca, Schroders, BP, and Heathrow Airport. The charter is designed “to bring prosperity into harmony with Nature, People and Planet over the coming decade.”
    The European Union’s Copernicus Climate Change Service has reported that 2020 tied with 2016 as the world’s warmest year on record. In 2020, temperatures globally were an average of 1.25 degrees C  higher than in pre-industrial times, and the last six years were the world’s hottest on record. The Arctic and northern Siberia continued to warm more quickly than the planet as a whole in 2020, with temperatures in parts of these regions averaging more than 6C above a 30-year average used as a baseline. This resulted in an "“unusually active” wildfire season, with fires poleward of the Arctic Circle releasing a record 244 million tonnes of CO2 in 2020, over a third more than in 2019. more
    The US experienced a record number of named tropical storms formed in the Atlantic, with a record 12 making landfall and its most active wildfire year on record leaving 262 dead. There were a record-breaking 22 billion-dollar weather and climate disasters that struck the country in 2020. more
  2. Coping with Covid-19
    The Dominican Government, through the Ministry of Tourism and Public Health, has announced new country-wide measures that it will begin offering free antigen testing to all international visitors staying at a hotel to meet the new Centers for Disease Control’s travel protocols requiring travellers from January 26, returning to the U.S. to present proof of a negative COVID-19 or antigen test prior to departure. Africa has been hit hard by the second wave of Covid-19 and the new variant 501Y.V2 which makes up to 90 per cent of new cases in South Africa.  As at 31 January, Africa has 90,4389 confirmed deaths and 3,553,032 confirmed cases to date. Data
    We are all vulnerable to new variants of the virus which may require new vaccines. As the WHO has been reaffirming for several months, a global pandemic requires no less than a world effort to end it. None of us will be safe until everyone is safe. Global access to coronavirus vaccines, tests and treatments for everyone who needs them, anywhere, is the only way out. This is a historical stress test for global cooperation. But we are ready to meet this challenge. This is why we have launched the Access to Covid-19 Tools (ACT)-Accelerator.
    There is very unlikely to be a post-Covid world, just as there is no post-flu world. Globally the World Health Organization estimates that 290,000 to 650,000 people die of respiratory diseases linked to seasonal flu each year. We have vaccinations and treatments and we have learnt to live with it.
    As Thomas Crampton, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer at The Commons Project has pointed out "You can be tested every time you cross a border. You cannot be vaccinated every time you cross a border." Covid-19 tests and vaccinations could become necessary for concerts, theatres stadiums and to cross national boundaries.  "Cathay Pacific, JetBlue, Lufthansa, Swiss Airlines, United Airlines and Virgin Atlantic are among the airlines that have already established partnerships with the Common Trust Network, an initiative that has been under development by the Swiss NGO The Commons Project and the World Economic Forum. The CommonPass is an app created by the group allows users to upload medical data such as a Covid-19 test result or, eventually, a proof of vaccination by a hospital or medical professional, generating a health certificate or pass in the form of a QR code that can be shown to authorities without revealing sensitive information. For travel, the app lists health pass requirements at the points of departure and arrival based on your itinerary." more
    But as The Economist has pointed out vaccine passports "are divisive, politically tricky and probably inevitable". The "yellow card" international certificate was created almost 100 years ago to record inoculations against cholera, yellow fever, typhus and smallpox. Many countries require a yellow-fever certificate as a pre-condition of entry. We don't yet know how effective vaccinations are against transmission. Vaccination passports will at least initially be divisive - those with underlying health conditions, over 60 and from wealthier countries will be vaccinated first and global parity in vaccination is a long way off.
    The Lowy Institute, an Australian think tank has researched the comparative performance of countries to answer the question: What impact have geography, political systems, population size, and economic development had on COVID-19 outcomes around the world? The answers are interesting  
  3. The New Normal
    So the new normal will involve learning to live with Covid-19 as we do influenza. Barcelona has recognised that confidence and safety are key elements for cities and tourist destinations in the post-COVID-19 context and made a tool available to them in order to minimise the risk of infection and to increase safety and confidence to reactivate the city’s economic fabric. Asserting that Barcelona never stops the city authorities are focussed on reactivating the economy and they are using the campaign slogan LET'S GET OUR CITY BACK
    Petra Hedorfer, CEO of the German National Tourism Board (GNTB)  wrote in January about the way the COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for global social and technological macrotrend accelerating the digitalisation of communication and information processes. As she points out "... sustainable consumption does not mean having to go without and does not require customers to put up with poorer quality or a poorer experience. Quite the opposite: Sustainability is a hallmark of quality and a competitive advantage because it directly improves the quality of life of locals and visitors alike." The GNTB commissioned research in October 2020 in their main source markets and 80% of all those surveyed said that they thought COVID-19 would lead to more sustainability in tourism. more

    A new platform has been launched to position and promote the Caribbean as a unique, special and desirable place to live, work and play; and to consummate exchanges among consumers, businesses and exceptional players in the Caribbean. Exceptional Caribbean is designed to help Caribbean people fall in love with ourselves. We need to lift up and promote talent; to elevate the spirits and minds of our people; to love ourselves, and make the world fall in love with us. Earth  Changers has acknowledged that: "Every origin and every destination has different rules, and every accommodation, tour or transport provider will work in different ways specific to their location, business and the appropriate risk-based approach."  they have produced so good general advice for travellers. We are going to have to be Covid-aware when we travel and safety and trust will be major issues for transport providers, destinations and tourism businesses to address. Covid security will remain a major concern for the foreseeable future. Vanuatu has launched a global campaign under the slogan, ‘We’ll keep it Beautiful for You,’ until travel restrictions are lifted, and tourists can return to the islands. Vanuatu’s Sustainable Tourism Policy's objective is “to protect and celebrate Vanuatu’s unique environment, culture, kastom and people through sustainable and responsible tourism.” Thailand is promoting ‘SEXY’ tourism. To be rolled out during 2021-2022, the ‘SEXY’ tourism concept is in response to the changes in travel behaviour and TAT’s goal to restore Thailand’s tourism: S – Safety and Hygiene, E – Environmental Sustainability, X – Extra Experiences, and Y – Yield. This reflects TAT’s existing strategy to move the Thai tourism industry out of mass tourism and towards responsible tourism with an emphasis on revenue-generating quality tourists.

  4. Tackling Biodiversity Loss
    There is some good news. African Parks has released three cheetahs into Bangweulu Wetlands in Zambia. Two new Whale Heritage Sites have been awarded in Tenerife and California. Whale Heritage Sites are a global accreditation scheme developed by the World Cetacean Alliance and supported by World Animal Protection, that recognises outstanding destinations that offer and celebrate responsible and sustainable wild whale and dolphin watching. Whale Heritage Site status provides tourists with an easy way to select responsible whale and dolphin watching destinations; places where people can experience cetaceans in their natural habitat and in an authentic and respectful way. There are only two other Whale Heritage Sites in the world: The Bluff, South Africa, and Hervey Bay, Australia.


    The African Wildlife Foundation has grave concerns for the future of wildlife in Africa "Unless African governments can maintain strong networks of community conservation areas, supporting thousands of jobs dedicated to wildlife conservation, protected wildlife areas face a difficult road to recovery. The fear is that Coronavirus in Africa could reverse 30 years of conservation gains, including communal conservancy programs in multiple countries. Early data show the fractures in the system, but the full effect of travel bans, border closures and vacation cancellations on protected areas and the local communities co-existing with wildlands is just starting to sink in across the African continent. The large revenue streams that supported livelihood and a stable economy were abruptly cut off in late March. No job in these areas was left unscathed. COVID-19 has revealed the fragility of wildlife conservation in Africa. With limited funding for most state-run nature agencies, there has been an over-reliance on tourism to support efforts. more
    These issues were discussed at WTM London in November

  5. Take Back Control - Manage Tourism
    In Amsterdam, there are plans to crack down on growing numbers of low-budget “drug tourists” and organized crime, by forbidding the sale of marijuana to foreigners in its  166 coffee shops. Research commissioned by the city revealed that 57 % of foreigners visiting the center of Amsterdam say that visiting a coffee shop is a “very important reason” for their visit. The Mayor insists that “Amsterdam remains an open and tolerant and hospitable city, but we want to end the undermining effects of criminal organizations.” more   In Venice the Mayor has controversially decided to keep the Doge's Palace closed until April. more
    Venice has postponed a planned entrance fee for daytrippers until January 2022. Venice has established a "control tower" a Smart Contol Room to monitor tourism flows in real-time using mobile phone data to identify which countries they are from. more
  6. The Kerala Approach extends to Madhya Pradesh.
    Madhya Pradesh has signed a memorandum of understanding with Kerala for replicating Kerala's pioneering Responsible Tourism initiative. Kerala's Tourism Minister Kadakampally Surendran said that RT was the “only tool for sustainable development of tourism” as it created better places for people to live in and visit. The Minister said the pact with Madhya Pradesh was “another milestone” for Kerala Tourism and its RT Mission. more  Madhya Pradesh's government has expressed its intent to adapt and implement the model, aimed at the development of village and local communities, eradicating poverty and emphasising women's empowerment. more
    In Kerala, performing artists were amongst the most affected by the pandemic, many have taken to performing and teaching virtually. " Nearly 18,000 artists under the government’s Responsible Tourism Mission, specialised in different art forms such as kathakali, koodiyattam, mohiniyattam, chavittunatakam and martial arts like kalaripayattu have been left with nothing after the tourism industry collapsed." more
  7. Plastic Pollution Spreads
    Further evidence that we have entered what future archaeologists will define as the plastic age. Digging at the Iron Age Castell Henllys site in Pembrokeshire; wrappers from well-known chocolate bars and snacks were among 2,000 items found trampled into the ground. In the Arctic Ocean scientists have found widespread pollution by microplastics. Roughly three-quarters of those fibres were polyester and resembled those used in clothing and textiles, highlighting how the laundry of synthetic clothes is polluting the oceans. A 2019 study estimated that 878 tonnes of plastic microfibers are released every year from household laundry in North America through wastewater treatment plants. The weight is the equivalent weight of ten blue whales. Other studies have found microplastics at the highest point on Earth, near the summit of Mount Everest, in penguins' bodies in Antarctica and in Alpine snow. more
    Scientists have now discovered the processes of clogging and dispersing through which plastics spread. Microplastic particles get stuck when travelling through porous materials such as soil and sediment but later break free and often continue to move substantially further. more
  8. Responsible Tourism in Colorado, USA
    Hawaii
    is setting the budget and "looking more for the higher dollar, higher spend kind of tourists". The House Consumer Protection and Commerce Chairman has said "We need tourism to be able to come back, but we also are exploring this so that we’re ensuring it’s the kind of tourists that are best for Hawaii, and it’s not necessarily mass, budget tourism where everybody’s looking for the cheapest prices and people are just coming here in droves,” and that "lawmakers are pursuing multiple goals at once with the bill, including funding climate change mitigation and “promoting responsible tourism.” Lawmakers are discussing taxing tourist through surcharges on "vehicles that are rented for six months or less, including mopeds, and would also apply to vans or buses that are used to haul tourists or luggage.
    Durango is a small city in southwestern Colorado, near the New Mexico border, they have a new tourism strategy combining management and marketing.  The strategy recognises that the "real measure of effective tourism is about the social and economic impact." "We know that tourism is doing its job when Main Avenue is bustling, the job market is healthy, affordable tourism is on the rise, and the cultural fabric ... is invigorated." "One of the ultimate goods of tourism is to increase quality of life for residents... In addition to implementing strategies  that avoid overcrowding, Visit Durango will also focus on environmental sustainability   and stewardship of the destination." Their marketing strategy focuses on high-value responsible travellers to "generate great economic returns  with less impact on the community."
    Breckenridge is a Colorado town at the base of the Rocky Mountains, known for its ski resort, year-round alpine activities and Gold Rush history which has left it with a Victorian core. The Town Council has committed to what the tourism office President Lucy Kay describes as  "responsible tourism". They are going post-pandemic to be "looking for ways we can target guests whose value sets align with ours,”  “… Figure out who are people who think about the environment, who think about other people, who think about the world in a similar way to us, and try to invite those people in first.” Event fatigue was an issue pre-pandemic, and Covid-19 has created an opportunity to reevaluate tourism. One summer resident has commented, "How would that happen, and who decides what the criteria are (political party, voting record, religion, race)? Sound pretty Orwellian to me." [The press report has been misunderstood. Ed.]
  9. Brexit impacts on travel
    The UK has taken back control of its borders, and so has the EU. Fast track lanes no longer available except by grace and favour and UK citizens no longer have any guarantee of entry, immigration procedures will be slower. " Now the official is required by European Union law to conduct deeper checks. They may ask for the purpose of the visit; where you plan to travel and stay; how long you intend to remain in the EU; how you propose to fund your stay; and whether you constitute a threat to public health." Travellers can take in no more than 200 cigarettes and a litre of spirits.  No “POAO”. This stands for Products Of Animal Origin, and the government specifically warns you cannot take food “containing meat or dairy (e.g. a ham and cheese sandwich) into the EU”. The same applies to Northern Ireland.
    As the UK chose to become a third country, the EU’s long-standing “90/180 rule” has taken effect for British travellers. UK citizens can stay only 90 days (about three months) in any 180 (six months) in the Schengen area. The 90-day limit is not per country. It applies to the entire Schengen Zone.  In Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, France, and Spain, it appears that third country tour guides are simply not permitted. And from some point in 2022 UK travellers to the EU will need to register online and pay in advance for an “Etias“  permit under the European Travel Information and Authorisation System. more
    None of this should surprise UK citizens; the remain campaign pointed out that these were consequences arising from third-country status.
  10. Miscellany

♦ Rooted's selection of the Best Readings, Ideas, and Solutions of 2020 "From decolonizing museums to urban biodiversity hotspots, 2020 moved the needle forward in a meaningful way."

♦ New Zealand has launched a campaign against "Travelling Under the Social Influence" to discover something new and think outside the box.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism December 2020

The next edition will be out mid-January
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

  1. RT Interviews and Panels from WTM, London are all now available
  2. States are adopting Responsible Tourism in India 
  3. Tourism devastated in the developing world
  4. Aviation and Climate Change
  5. Building Back Better? 
  6. Experiential & Domestic Tourism 
  7. Conserving Resources Requires Behavioural Change 
  8. Overtourism
  9. If covid is the new normal... 
  10. Miscellany 

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    1. RT Interviews and Panels from WTM, London are all now available
      Close to  4,000 people watched the Responsible Tourism interviews and panels at WTM, London in November. All of the recordings are now freely available on the Responsible Tourism YouTube channel in the WTM 2020 Playlist: How can we make tourism better?  Based on the discussions at WTM London and Responsible Tourism trends in the last year or so the January RT News will feature a draft RT Manifesto to be discussed and honed throughout 2021. It is time to take stock again of what we have learnt about how to make tourism better.
    2. States are adopting Responsible Tourism in India
      It remains to be seen whether the experience of Covid-19 will change our attitude to government regulation. Many have pointed out that you can isolate yourself from Covid-19 and that there will be a vaccine. But, you cannot self isolate from the impact of climate change and there will be no vaccine. Covid-19 and climate change are major challenges, threats, that require a collective response which only government can determine and implement. The freeloaders who leave it to others and refuse to make the sacrifices necessary to meet the challenges, need to be coerced through regulation and policing to do so.

      India is now leading in the development of Responsible Tourism, not least because of the way in which a new national tourism policy and strategy is nearing implementation. It will support and promote Responsible Tourism across the nation, building on the work of the individual states in empowering local government through the panchayats to work with communities and businesses at the local level to make tourism better for communities, businesses and tourists. The introduction of Responsible Tourism in Kerala in 2008, the learning from the initial experiments which has enabled the Responsible Tourism Mission to roll out the approach across the state and achieve impact at scale, has encouraged replication. India’s success with implementing Responsible Tourism and demonstrating the efficiency and efficacy of the approach has demonstrated the important role of national, state and local government in making tourism better for all stakeholders.

    3. Tourism devastated in the developing world
      The International Monetary Fund has pointed out the obvious "Tourism-dependent countries will likely feel the negative impacts of the crisis for much longer than other economies. Contact-intensive services key to the tourism and travel sectors are disproportionately affected by the pandemic and will continue to struggle until people feel safe to travel en masse again." It is obvious, but the focus in the wealthier countries, the source markets, has been on the impacts at home and in their outbound industry. The IMF points out that: "The global pandemic, the first of its scale in a new era of interconnectedness, has put 100 million jobs at risk, many in micro, small, and medium-sized enterprises that employ a high share of women, who represent 54% of the tourism workforce, according to the UNWTO."  The October World Economic Outlook projected the global economy would contract by 4.4% in 2020. The shock in tourism-dependent economies will be far worse. Real GDP among African countries dependent on tourism will shrink by 12%. Among tourism-dependent Caribbean nations, the decline will also reach 12%. Pacific island nations such as Fiji could see real GDP shrink by a staggering 21% in 2020. more
      As part of the Telegraph's Unlock Long Haul campaign, the paper has been drawing attention to the impacts in the developing world: 'African communities are on their knees because this government doesn't care about travel'; Without tourists, Myanmar has travelled back in time – and its people face devastation; Africa in crisis as the loss of tourism threatens widespread poverty and extinctions; 'I lost my tourism business in March – now I'm catching fish to survive' 'I'd say 90% of the Galapagos economy has disappeared. People are selling whatever they can in the street – food, bread, pastries' more
      The Latin America Travel Company are encouraging would-be holidaymakers to continue travelling now, where current rules and restrictions allow. Tourists to the Galapagos Islands have dropped 75% in 2020,  in November of this year the island saw less than 1,500 visitors. As John Stanley, Founder and Director of The Latin America Travel Company points out " now is likely the one and only time to be able to visit some of the world’s most popular destinations and feel like you have the place entirely to yourself" and it is also bringing much-needed revenue to countries who rely heavily on income from tourism.
    4. Aviation and Climate Change
      The aviation industry sees itself as a special case, satisfied with the steps it is taking to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. The Climate Action Tracker concludes that the CORSIA scheme ICAO has set up to achieve carbon reductions "will probably cover less than half of the international aviation emissions between now and 2035, and is likely to allow compensation without real emission reductions elsewhere. We rate the international aviation sector’s carbon-neutral growth goal as ‘critically insufficient’."
      Hydrogen-powered aviation is the most likely way forward as the climate crisis worsens. ZeroAvia, a leading innovator in decarbonising commercial aviation, has secured £12.3m ($16.3m) in UK Government funding to deliver a breakthrough 19-seat hydrogen-electric powered aircraft that is market-ready by 2023. To achieve this, it will collaborate with two partners, the European Marine Energy Centre and Aeristech. The HyFlyer II project will conclude with another world's first hydrogen-electric flight by ZeroAvia in a 19-seat aircraft, with a 350-mile flight.
      Meanwhile, The Guardian reports a US congressional report has concluded that Boeing officials “inappropriately coached” test pilots during recertification efforts after two fatal 737 MAX crashes killed 346 people. The Senate commerce committee chairman, Roger Wicker, said the report included “significant examples of lapses in aviation safety oversight and failed leadership in the FAA”. Boeing faces a continuing criminal probe into the MAX. The committee said its review was “constrained due to the continued criminal investigation”.
    5. Build Back Better?
      There was an enlightening discussion about to Build Back Better post-Covid-19 at WTM, London.
      There is a great deal of rethinking about both the marketing and management of destinations with greater emphasis on tourism in rural and open-air areas, rather than cities. In November Scotland became the first national tourism organisation to join Tourism Declares a Climate Emergency. The declaration is part of VistScotland's ambition to play a leading role in the development of Scotland as a globally recognised responsible destination and promote geographical and seasonal spread. Back in September VisitScotland's Insight Department published Navigating the New Normal-Post COVID-19 Tourism Consumer Trends.   VFR has become a more significant determinant of travel plans, summer travel was about finding fresh air and space and this travel motivation may continue into the winter. They expect to see "a shift towards tourism flowing to less crowded destinations ... The result will focus a shift from footfall and number of visitors towards prioritising spend per visitor, which provides an opportunity for the tourism sector to focus on improving the quality of experience versus the quantity of tourists."
      Cities are beginning to think about attracting digital nomads. Buenos Aires is positioning itself as a post-pandemic destination for digital nomads.  Fernando Straface, Secretary-General and Secretary for International Relations, City of Buenos Aires argues that "the future competition of cities is going to be around quality of life,” Buenos Aires is working to become a ’15-minute city’ where everything is accessible within the local neighbourhood.
      Palau, in Micronesia, now requires visitors to sign an environmental pledge upon arrival, committing to act in an ‘ecologically and culturally responsible way’. Like many Small Island Developing States Palau is heavily dependent on tourists who arrive by air and eat mostly imported food.
    6. Experiential & Domestic Tourism
      There is ongoing fear of travel amongst hosts and potential guests. As this edition goes to print, there are international and domestic travel bans across most of the UK.  Research by YouGov across 25 countries, and almost 17,000 people, shows that two thirds (67%) of British people say that the current regulations are preventing them from travelling. This compares to 58% who say that health concerns are doing the same. There are more detailed results from the survey here.
      Germany has launched Feel Good and Barrier Free travel experiences.  Cape Town is encouraging locals to explore the city after months indoors. The City of Cape Town, together with Cape Town Tourism (CTT), has launched the Pocket-Friendly Challenge aimed at making tourism more affordable and boosting the visitor economy. The Pocket-Friendly Challenge features a series of two-minute episodes where various travellers explore Cape Town’s neighbourhoods with a set budget of R150 (10USD)  per person; episodes will be released weekly.
      The UAE Vice-President, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, earlier this month launched the first federal domestic tourism campaign: "World’s Coolest Winter". The campaign will run for 45 day encouraging residents to explore the hidden gems of the seven emirates, landmarks and attractions that distinguish every emirate and contribute to the UAE as a single destination.
    7. Conserving Resources Requires Behavioural Change
      "My Green Butler" focuses on persuasive communication (technology and interpersonal) to encourage management, staff and guests to adapt their behaviour and conserve." Launched by ICRT-Australia and piloted amongst other places at Disneyland Paris, substantial savings in resource use have been achieved. Guest energy use has been reduced at different properties by 12-33%, housekeeping energy use by 18%, 4% on public space overnight heating and increased guest satisfaction. More
      Chris Warren, the driving force behind My Green Butler,  points out that: " The search appears to be for quantity, collecting ever-growing digital warehouses of data, rather than interpreting it, identifying connections, and understanding what action to take. Maybe we should push the pause button. .....  "Data is for decision making it should be used to enable responsible action promptly, it should be able to ‘speak’ to all involved in a persuasive, it can accelerate change in your firm if it is real-time advice.... Technological solutions should focus on our social practices rather than on the resources alone." more
    8. Overtourism
      Venice is planning to introduce a fee for anyone entering Venice without an overnight reservation from January 1, 2022. "In light of the current situation around the Covid-19 pandemic, we have decided to make an important gesture regarding the optics of wanting to encourage the tourists' return," announced Michele Zuin, the councillor responsible for the economy." "The "contributo di accesso," or access fee, will be priced according to how busy the city is in a bid to dissuade people from entering on peak days, thereby spreading them out throughout the season." more
      Venezi Autentica offers "everything you need to enjoy the best of Venice and support the local community."
      Jordi Rabassa, councillor for Ciutat Vella in Barcelona explains the new plan for La Rambla "‘Ciutat Vella can be a role model of how to move from a monoculture to something more diversified that employs and caters to the needs of residents through creating jobs in culture, technology, ecology and sustainable initiatives’. "The aim is to lure back locals, not just tourists, using culture. The highlight of this cultural revolution is the grand Teatre Principal, which opened in 1603 but has been closed since 2006. Led by local businessman José María Trenor, a consortium has raised €35m to refurbish the theatre into a multi-function performance space hosting hi-tech immersive experiences and concerts as well as other events. The regional government also plans to convert Foneria de Canons, an 18th-century gun foundry, into a cultural centre." more
      Courmayeur, in the Italian Alps, has a new sustainability strategy. Skyway intends to undertake concrete action in the form of green-certified supplies, reducing waste volume, eco-energy sources and emissions, water and eventually, a green consortium.
    9. If covid is the new normal....
      On December 15th the UK government launched a new Test to Release scheme so that passengers arriving in England have the option to shorten their self-isolation by up to half on receipt of a negative COVID-19 test. The scheme was "embroiled in chaos on its first day of operation after the last-minute publication of 11 private providers, most of whom appeared unable to offer the service on Tuesday morning." Airports which have had testing in place for weeks or months were left off the list of approved providers. The introduction of the scheme was described as chaotic.
      ABTA reports that UK travellers are 20 per cent more likely to use a travel professional now than before the pandemic, with two in five citing the security of a package holiday (41 per cent) and the travel professional’s up-to-date advice (40 per cent) as the main reasons. ABTA is launching a Travel with Confidence campaign.
    10. Miscellany
      Birgit Trauer's The Way of the Peaceful Traveller - Dare to Care and Connect Birgit describes the book as an invitation for the open-minded human beings who believe that this beautiful world should do better and that we all can contribute to this. "Venture into the world of emotions and feelings, of needs and values, and connect more intimately with their significance in your life. Illuminate and examine the ideas of culture and stereotypes, and discover the beauty of diversity, within you and around you." more
      Douglas Trent is President of the Focus Conservation Fund and Research Director, Instituto Sustentar de Responsabilidade Socioambiental  in Brazil. With 40 years of experience of developing community ecotourism, he has just published How to Develop Community Ecotourism published in Portuguese and English a copy can be downloaded hereThe One Planet Network 2019 Annual Magazine has just been published. It contains several tourism case studies
      ⊕ ICRT Austalia My Green Butler: encouraging 'conserving' behaviours - see (7) above
      Costa Cruises: circular economy principles applied to waste management, plastics, water and energy use  and efficiency
      Iberostar: moving from plastic elimination to apply circular economic principles and a Wave of Change approach
      UNEP's transforming tourism initiative through sustainable procurement
      Travel Green Europe App 
      One Plant Network: Sustainable Tourism Policy Talks, Smart Destinations Network, transforming tourism value chains in developing countries and SIDS
      Global Sustainable Tourism Council
      Global Tourism Plastics Initiative: 'concerted commitments'
      Grupo GEA Peru: training and technical assistance leading to a sustainable tourism label "Inca Alliance"
      Comment: There are other initiatives in Sustainable Consumption & Production. Across all sectors the focus is still on talks and studies, there is almost no evidence of impact. 

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The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism: WTM Virtual Special 10 & 11 November

The next edition will be out at the beginning of December
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

This year's WTM, London is virtual, there is no need to travel to London nor to find board and lodging away from home. You can participate from anywhere in the world over the extended hours, the only carbon emitted will be from the electricity you and the internet consumes, and some of that is renewable.
Register here.

The full programme of live, on-demand and catchup panels and interviews is available here.

  1. World Responsible Tourism Awards winners have been announced 
  2. Resilience & Covid 19
  3. Build Back Better
  4. Tourism and Biodiversity, Friend or Foe?
  5. Decarbonising Aviation 
  6. Responsible Tourism in India
  7. Tourism and Racism 
  8. Certification and Consumer Choice
  9. Can we make tourism better – a manifesto for change.
  10. Miscellany 

 

1. World Responsible Tourism Awards winners have been announced
The ambition of the Awards has always been to recognise businesses and destinations which are making tourism better and to spread good practice – to educate, inspire and challenge others to do likewise or do more.
In this year, when the world faces a global pandemic, it seemed inappropriate to continue with the World Responsible Tourism Awards as usual. It is not Business as Usual, and the crisis is likely to continue for some time.
This year the judges decided to commend businesses and destinations which are taking responsibility and addressing the challenge of Covid-19 and to Highly Commend and Commend businesses and destinations. The judges wanted to recognise those who have taken responsibility and addressed the many challenges of the pandemic.

2. Resilience & Covid 19

On Tuesday 10th at 10:30, we look at Resilience & Covid-19 looking for solutions to how we get travel moving again, how we learn to live with the coronavirus and reflecting on what we have learned over the last year about resilience. Safety, confidence and trust have become central to restarting travel and tourism. WTTC and destinations have developed protocols for the new normal. It is now widely recognised that the pandemic will be with us globally for a while; we must learn to live with it and manage risk.  The tourists, whether travelling for leisure or business, have to feel confident about their safety from home, through the airport, on the plane or train and on arrival through the airport to their accommodation – and of course back again. And they have to be confident that quarantine will not be imposed on them in the destination or on their return.  WTM Virtual Link

92 UNWTO Member States participated in the first meeting of the Committee for the Development of an International Code for the Protection of Tourists. This initiative seeks to achieve a more fair and balanced share of responsibilities among all tourism stakeholders in the post-COVID-19 world. more

Barcelona is represented on this panel. It has long recognised that it has an overtourism problem and has been addressing it for several years. "Barcelona has created an ambitious project which aims to reclaim public space for its residents, starting with La Rambla, which it intends to turn into a cultural hub. Speaking about this new plan, Rabassa said, ‘Ciutat Vella can be a role model of how to move from a monoculture to something more diversified that employs and caters to the needs of residents through creating jobs in culture, technology, ecology and sustainable initiatives’. more

3. Build Back Better

The S-G of the UN has spoken of the crisis as 'an unprecedented opportunity to transform the relationship of tourism with nature, climate and the economy.... to examine how it interacts with our societies and other economic sectors; to measure and manage it better; to ensure a fair distribution of its benefits and to advance the transition towards a carbon-neutral and resilient tourism economy.' In this panel, we'll look at the different ways in which five destinations are seeking to change the way tourism works to take the opportunity provided by Covid-19 to build back better for communities and their environment. Tuesday 10th at 12:00 WTM Virtual Link

ABTA's recent report on Tourism for Good can be downloaded here 
In April 2019 Booking.com reported that "Over half (55%) of global travelers report being more determined to make sustainable travel choices than they were a year ago, but barriers include a lack of knowledge and available or appealing options when trying to put this into practice... almost three quarters (72%) of travelers believe that people need to act now and make sustainable travel choices to save the planet for future generations. While results were relatively consistent across ages, almost three-quarters (74%) of 46-55 year olds believe most strongly that this is needed".

You can find more about Germany's Feel Good campaign here.
Scotland is one of the destinations participating in this panel, Malcolm Roughhead, CEO of VisitScotland, talks about managing Coivd-19 and building back better.

4. Tourism and Biodiversity, Friend or Foe?

At 14:00 the panellists are addressing the question Tourism and Biodiversity, Friend or Foe? WTM Virtual Link

There are a wealth of interviews here seeking to answer the question Biodiversity, ecosystem services and tourism – conflict or symbiosis? How can the relationship be improved – what are the solutions?  There are two panels on animal welfare available on demand

There are further interviews and background to the issues here 

5. Decarbonising Aviation 

The aviation industry is our sector's Achilles' heel. Flying is not the problem; the emissions from the fuel that aviation runs on is the issue. For too long aviation has resisted change, insisting that there is no alternative. Now there is. On this panel we have Airbus, they've just announced hydrogen-powered flight by 2035; the founder of Universal Hydrogen; the Carbon Strategy Director, Heathrow Airport; and easyJet's, Director of Flight Operations. From Jamaica, we'll hear about why aviation matters and why it needs to decarbonise and Noel Jopsephides of tour operator Sunvil, will explain why aviation needs to change.

Read this blog on the WTM Hub for the background on decarbonising aviation

How quickly will the airlines take up zero-emissions flight?  How should the travel and tourism sector respond if aviation, a major supplier, fails to adopt clean technology fast enough, presenting a significant risk to our industry in general and the many destinations dependent upon it?  How can we best encourage the aviation industry, manufacturers, airports and airlines to make rapid change? Is the tourism industry willing to accept some additional cost and able to force its supplier to adopt the best technologies? Will polluting aircraft still be flying in 2050? How do we speed the introduction of zero-carbon flight? the panel is at 15:30 on Tuesday 10th November  WTM Virtual Link

Ian Care is an award-winning innovator who has provided technical, project and innovation leadership, acclaimed by and delivering £multi-million benefits for Rolls-Royce plc. Harold Goodwin conducted a series of interviews with him recently - Ian is a man who thinks outside the box to find practical solutions. Watch the interviews here. 

6. Responsible Tourism in India

India is rapidly emerging as a leader in Responsible Tourism. The strapline Incredible India accurately conveys the geographic and historical variety of natural and built heritage which India offers the tourist and the rich diversity of living cultural heritage which surrounds any visitor to the sub-continent. In 2008 Kerala adopted Responsible Tourism and developed an approach which ensured that the local communities benefited through Village Life Experiences and producer cooperatives. Madhya Pradesh has followed with a state policy, and other states are looking to follow. The new national tourism policy of the Ministry of Tourism endorses Responsible Tourism. India is now arguably leading the world in adopting a Responsible Tourism approach. In this round table panel, we shall hear from policymakers about their experience with Responsible Tourism and about what it has to offer. Wednesday 11th November 10:30  WTM Virtual Link

7. Tourism and Racism

Alex Temblador chairs the panel on Tourism and Racism on Wednesday 11th at 14:00.  WTM Virtual Link

There is a host of interviews on tourism and racism available playlist here  There are further resources here.

8. Certification and Consumer Choice

On Wednesday 11th at 15:30 the panel included GSTC representatives discussion the future development of certification  A key ambition of sustainability labels has been to ensure that those tourism businesses which adopt a range of sustainable practices are rewarded as consumers choose them in preference to others. The Global Sustainable Tourism Council was created to establish a consistent baseline across schemes. Understanding that issues vary from place to place and that the credibility of the label(s) can be undermined each time a guest spots bad practice in a certified "sustainable business" – we discuss where certification is today and what it holds for the future. Are there too many schemes? What strategies could deliver more transparent consumer information? What can be done to improve certification and drive the sustainability agenda forward? How will health and safety shape sustainable tourism? This panel discussion tackles some of these issues and identifies successes, challenges, and how certification can help make tourism more responsible. WTM Virtual Link

9. Can we make tourism better – a manifesto for change.

This year's Responsible Tourism programme ends with a panel on Wednesday at 17:00 reflecting on this year's WTM Responsible Tourism sessions and to consider how we move forward to make better tourism for travellers and holidaymakers; for destinations and for the communities who live there; and for businesses in the source markets and destinations.  What principles should inform the way we recover our industry and work to use tourism to make better places for people to live in? What role should governments play?  How do we practically make tourism better?  WTM Virtual Link

10. Miscellany 

  • There is a panel on Responsible Tourism in China available in the on demand programme at WTM Virtual.
  • IATA reports that international passenger demand was down 88.8% in September, capacity was down 78.9% and the average load was 43.5%.
  • Flight Radar graphs commercial passenger flights + cargo flights + charter flights + some business jet flights.
  • The New Zealand Tourism Futures Taskforce is an independent public private partnership to lead the thinking on the future of tourism in New Zealand. The main purpose of the Taskforce is to advise on what changes New Zealand can make to the tourism system, so that tourism enriches both New Zealand and the wellbeing of New Zealanders. The Taskforce will provide an initial report on the future of tourism in New Zealand in December 2020, with final recommendations and steps for implementation in April 2021.

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News

RT News Video Channel

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM