Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism: WTM Virtual Special 10 & 11 November

The next edition will be out at the beginning of December
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

This year's WTM, London is virtual, there is no need to travel to London nor to find board and lodging away from home. You can participate from anywhere in the world over the extended hours, the only carbon emitted will be from the electricity you and the internet consumes, and some of that is renewable.
Register here.

The full programme of live, on-demand and catchup panels and interviews is available here.

  1. World Responsible Tourism Awards winners have been announced 
  2. Resilience & Covid 19
  3. Build Back Better
  4. Tourism and Biodiversity, Friend or Foe?
  5. Decarbonising Aviation 
  6. Responsible Tourism in India
  7. Tourism and Racism 
  8. Certification and Consumer Choice
  9. Can we make tourism better – a manifesto for change.
  10. Miscellany 

 

1. World Responsible Tourism Awards winners have been announced
The ambition of the Awards has always been to recognise businesses and destinations which are making tourism better and to spread good practice – to educate, inspire and challenge others to do likewise or do more.
In this year, when the world faces a global pandemic, it seemed inappropriate to continue with the World Responsible Tourism Awards as usual. It is not Business as Usual, and the crisis is likely to continue for some time.
This year the judges decided to commend businesses and destinations which are taking responsibility and addressing the challenge of Covid-19 and to Highly Commend and Commend businesses and destinations. The judges wanted to recognise those who have taken responsibility and addressed the many challenges of the pandemic.

2. Resilience & Covid 19

On Tuesday 10th at 10:30, we look at Resilience & Covid-19 looking for solutions to how we get travel moving again, how we learn to live with the coronavirus and reflecting on what we have learned over the last year about resilience. Safety, confidence and trust have become central to restarting travel and tourism. WTTC and destinations have developed protocols for the new normal. It is now widely recognised that the pandemic will be with us globally for a while; we must learn to live with it and manage risk.  The tourists, whether travelling for leisure or business, have to feel confident about their safety from home, through the airport, on the plane or train and on arrival through the airport to their accommodation – and of course back again. And they have to be confident that quarantine will not be imposed on them in the destination or on their return.  WTM Virtual Link

92 UNWTO Member States participated in the first meeting of the Committee for the Development of an International Code for the Protection of Tourists. This initiative seeks to achieve a more fair and balanced share of responsibilities among all tourism stakeholders in the post-COVID-19 world. more

Barcelona is represented on this panel. It has long recognised that it has an overtourism problem and has been addressing it for several years. "Barcelona has created an ambitious project which aims to reclaim public space for its residents, starting with La Rambla, which it intends to turn into a cultural hub. Speaking about this new plan, Rabassa said, ‘Ciutat Vella can be a role model of how to move from a monoculture to something more diversified that employs and caters to the needs of residents through creating jobs in culture, technology, ecology and sustainable initiatives’. more

3. Build Back Better

The S-G of the UN has spoken of the crisis as 'an unprecedented opportunity to transform the relationship of tourism with nature, climate and the economy.... to examine how it interacts with our societies and other economic sectors; to measure and manage it better; to ensure a fair distribution of its benefits and to advance the transition towards a carbon-neutral and resilient tourism economy.' In this panel, we'll look at the different ways in which five destinations are seeking to change the way tourism works to take the opportunity provided by Covid-19 to build back better for communities and their environment. Tuesday 10th at 12:00 WTM Virtual Link

ABTA's recent report on Tourism for Good can be downloaded here 
In April 2019 Booking.com reported that "Over half (55%) of global travelers report being more determined to make sustainable travel choices than they were a year ago, but barriers include a lack of knowledge and available or appealing options when trying to put this into practice... almost three quarters (72%) of travelers believe that people need to act now and make sustainable travel choices to save the planet for future generations. While results were relatively consistent across ages, almost three-quarters (74%) of 46-55 year olds believe most strongly that this is needed".

You can find more about Germany's Feel Good campaign here.
Scotland is one of the destinations participating in this panel, Malcolm Roughhead, CEO of VisitScotland, talks about managing Coivd-19 and building back better.

4. Tourism and Biodiversity, Friend or Foe?

At 14:00 the panellists are addressing the question Tourism and Biodiversity, Friend or Foe? WTM Virtual Link

There are a wealth of interviews here seeking to answer the question Biodiversity, ecosystem services and tourism – conflict or symbiosis? How can the relationship be improved – what are the solutions?  There are two panels on animal welfare available on demand

There are further interviews and background to the issues here 

5. Decarbonising Aviation 

The aviation industry is our sector's Achilles' heel. Flying is not the problem; the emissions from the fuel that aviation runs on is the issue. For too long aviation has resisted change, insisting that there is no alternative. Now there is. On this panel we have Airbus, they've just announced hydrogen-powered flight by 2035; the founder of Universal Hydrogen; the Carbon Strategy Director, Heathrow Airport; and easyJet's, Director of Flight Operations. From Jamaica, we'll hear about why aviation matters and why it needs to decarbonise and Noel Jopsephides of tour operator Sunvil, will explain why aviation needs to change.

Read this blog on the WTM Hub for the background on decarbonising aviation

How quickly will the airlines take up zero-emissions flight?  How should the travel and tourism sector respond if aviation, a major supplier, fails to adopt clean technology fast enough, presenting a significant risk to our industry in general and the many destinations dependent upon it?  How can we best encourage the aviation industry, manufacturers, airports and airlines to make rapid change? Is the tourism industry willing to accept some additional cost and able to force its supplier to adopt the best technologies? Will polluting aircraft still be flying in 2050? How do we speed the introduction of zero-carbon flight? the panel is at 15:30 on Tuesday 10th November  WTM Virtual Link

Ian Care is an award-winning innovator who has provided technical, project and innovation leadership, acclaimed by and delivering £multi-million benefits for Rolls-Royce plc. Harold Goodwin conducted a series of interviews with him recently - Ian is a man who thinks outside the box to find practical solutions. Watch the interviews here. 

6. Responsible Tourism in India

India is rapidly emerging as a leader in Responsible Tourism. The strapline Incredible India accurately conveys the geographic and historical variety of natural and built heritage which India offers the tourist and the rich diversity of living cultural heritage which surrounds any visitor to the sub-continent. In 2008 Kerala adopted Responsible Tourism and developed an approach which ensured that the local communities benefited through Village Life Experiences and producer cooperatives. Madhya Pradesh has followed with a state policy, and other states are looking to follow. The new national tourism policy of the Ministry of Tourism endorses Responsible Tourism. India is now arguably leading the world in adopting a Responsible Tourism approach. In this round table panel, we shall hear from policymakers about their experience with Responsible Tourism and about what it has to offer. Wednesday 11th November 10:30  WTM Virtual Link

7. Tourism and Racism

Alex Temblador chairs the panel on Tourism and Racism on Wednesday 11th at 14:00.  WTM Virtual Link

There is a host of interviews on tourism and racism available playlist here  There are further resources here.

8. Certification and Consumer Choice

On Wednesday 11th at 15:30 the panel included GSTC representatives discussion the future development of certification  A key ambition of sustainability labels has been to ensure that those tourism businesses which adopt a range of sustainable practices are rewarded as consumers choose them in preference to others. The Global Sustainable Tourism Council was created to establish a consistent baseline across schemes. Understanding that issues vary from place to place and that the credibility of the label(s) can be undermined each time a guest spots bad practice in a certified "sustainable business" – we discuss where certification is today and what it holds for the future. Are there too many schemes? What strategies could deliver more transparent consumer information? What can be done to improve certification and drive the sustainability agenda forward? How will health and safety shape sustainable tourism? This panel discussion tackles some of these issues and identifies successes, challenges, and how certification can help make tourism more responsible. WTM Virtual Link

9. Can we make tourism better – a manifesto for change.

This year's Responsible Tourism programme ends with a panel on Wednesday at 17:00 reflecting on this year's WTM Responsible Tourism sessions and to consider how we move forward to make better tourism for travellers and holidaymakers; for destinations and for the communities who live there; and for businesses in the source markets and destinations.  What principles should inform the way we recover our industry and work to use tourism to make better places for people to live in? What role should governments play?  How do we practically make tourism better?  WTM Virtual Link

10. Miscellany 

  • There is a panel on Responsible Tourism in China available in the on demand programme at WTM Virtual.
  • IATA reports that international passenger demand was down 88.8% in September, capacity was down 78.9% and the average load was 43.5%.
  • Flight Radar graphs commercial passenger flights + cargo flights + charter flights + some business jet flights.
  • The New Zealand Tourism Futures Taskforce is an independent public private partnership to lead the thinking on the future of tourism in New Zealand. The main purpose of the Taskforce is to advise on what changes New Zealand can make to the tourism system, so that tourism enriches both New Zealand and the wellbeing of New Zealanders. The Taskforce will provide an initial report on the future of tourism in New Zealand in December 2020, with final recommendations and steps for implementation in April 2021.

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

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Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

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Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

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Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism: London Travel Week Special

The next edition will be out on 9th November, for Virtual  WTM
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

This year's London Travel Week and WTM, London are virtual, there is no need to travel to London nor to find board and lodging away from home. You can participate from anywhere in the world over the extended hours, the only carbon emitted will be from the electricity you and the internet consumes, and some of that is renewable.


Register for WTM Virtual 9-11 November includes London Travel Week with World Responsible Tourism Day on November 4th

You can find the full 2020 WTM Responsible Tourism (4, 10, 11 November) programme here https://responsibletourismpartnership.org/wtm-london-2020/

  1. World Responsible Tourism Day on November 4th register
  2. World Responsible Tourism Awards register
  3. Responsible Tourism at Virtual WTM November 10th & 11th register
  4. Tourism and Racism 
  5. Covid-19 still rampant in the northern hemisphere 
  6. Developments in Kerala 
  7. Employing the differently-abled and the disadvantaged in India 
  8. Developments in Aviation 
  9. Tourism and Wildlife 
  10. Miscellany 

1. World Responsible Tourism Day on November 4th register
11:45 Sir Tim Smit, the Co-Founder of the Eden Project
gives a keynote address explaining why responsible business and Responsible Tourism make good business sense.
This is followed by a series of short conversations with leaders in Responsible Tourism.
12:00 Wolfgang Neumann, on the Sustainable Hospitality Alliance,
12:15 Martin Brackenbury, on Resilience and Covid-19
12:30 Justin Francis on Making Tourism Better
12:45 JoAnna Haugen on storytelling and why narrative matters
13:00  Charlotte Weibe about the TUI's work in Responsible Tourism
13:15 Gustavo Segura Sancho on Costa Rica
16:00 Garry Wilson CEO of EasyJet Holidays about how the company has been coping with Covid, the future of leisure travel by air and of course why taking your business in a responsible direction makes perfect sense.
16:30 Clare Jenkinson on ABTA's Tourism for Good report
16:50 Harold Goodwin looking forward to the RT programme on 10 & 11 November.

The full programme in detail can be found here 

2. World Responsible Tourism Awards register
In this year, when the world faces a global pandemic, it seemed inappropriate to continue with the World Responsible Tourism Awards as usual. It is not Business as Usual, and the crisis is likely to continue for some time. This year the judges decided to commend businesses and destinations which are taking responsibility and addressing the challenge of Covid-19 and to Highly Commend and Commend businesses and destinations. The judges wanted to recognise those who have taken responsibility and addressed the many challenges of the pandemic. The Awards will be announced at 15:30 GMT on November 4th here:  responsibletourism.wtm.com/Awards2020

3. Responsible Tourism at Virtual WTM November 10th & 11th register
10th November: 4 live panels Resilience & Covid 19; Build Back BetterTourism and Biodiversity, Friend or Foe? & Decarbonising Aviation.
11th November: 4 live panels Responsible Tourism in India; Racism in Tourism; Certification and Consumer Choice;  & Can we make tourism better – a manifesto for change.
10th & 11th November, four on-demand, pre-recorded sessions: Inclusive Employment for differently-abled people and the disadvantaged; Responsible Tourism in China;  and two on animal welfare

The full programme in detail can be found here  More in the next edition of RT News 9th November 

4. Tourism and Racism
Alex Temblador is moderating a panel on Tourism and Racism at WTM, London (11th November 14:00-15:00). Martinique LewisnPresident of the Black Travel Alliance is on Alex's panel. Findings from the Black Travel Alliance's (BTA) #PullUpForTravel campaign released on October 13th. They collected KPIs for employment, conferences & tradeshows, marketing campaigns, press and philanthropy. Key findings

  • "Black people are under-represented at all levels within the travel industry and there is a great need to address the imbalance.
  • There is, for the most part, lip service paid to diversity and inclusion and it is time for allies in the travel industry to join forces with organizations like the Black Travel Alliance and push for positive change in the travel industry – and the world at large."  more

5. Covid-19 still rampant in the northern hemisphere
As this edition of RT News goes to 'print' with London Travel Week just opening in the UK, the government has announced a more intense lockdown and banned all leisure travel as the pandemic runs rampant across the UK, Europe and most of the northern hemisphere.  As with influenza, it appears that Covid-19 is more virulent in autumn and winter. In June and July a coronavirus variant - 20A.EU1 - originated in Spanish farmworkers and spread rapidly and is now one of the most prevalent in Europe.
"It is important to note that there is currently no evidence the new variant's spread is due to a mutation that increases transmission or impacts clinical outcome," stresses Dr Emma Hodcroft of the University of Basel, lead author of the study. The researchers believe that the variant's expansion was facilitated by loosening travel restrictions and social distancing measures in summer....From July, 20A.EU1 moved with travelers as borders opened across Europe, and has now been identified in twelve European countries. It has also been transmitted from Europe to Hong Kong and New Zealand." more
Prof Devi Sridhar, the chair of global public health at Edinburgh University, said there were flaws in the UK government’s approach to travel over the summer. “Numbers were really low and that was our chance to keep them low,” she said. “The virus moves when people move.” more

6. Developments in Kerala
Launched by sustainable and socially-driven platform NotOnMap and tour operator and destination management consultant Help Tourism, in association with The International Centre for Responsible Tourism, India, the initiative aims to educate rural communities and property owners to get back on their feet so they can maintain their properties and work towards reviving the tourism industry while maintaining hygiene guidelines and safety precautions. The initiative is being backed by Bookings.com and aims to cover all stakeholders of the rural tourism sector in India. Read more in Outlook Traveller

"The prime objective of the initiative was to assist the rural communities, Kumar Anubhav, Founder and Director, NotOnMap, said. This will be done by capitalizing on untapped culture and value heritage in rural areas. Many industry experts are conceptualizing design and execute Project Travival. This project consisted of more than 150 training videos, Anubhav said.
The videos have been framed in over 18 regional languages divided into 12 modules for Homestay owners, village Panchayats, teachers, youth, and women of villages and travellers across India thus covering all stakeholders of “Rural Tourism” in India. The videos not only cover topics around homestay and personal safety and hygiene but also educate people on sustainable practices and homestay business during Covid-19. It is inclusive of all points by international bodies and the government guidelines, includes policies to be followed by the hosts to maintain a guaranteed safe stay." Read more in the Financial Express

7. Employing the differently-abled and the disadvantaged in India
Back in 2016 Lemon Tree Hotels won Gold in the World Responsible Tourism Awards at WTM London for their commitment to barrier-free employment – they were also overall winners that year.  Patu Keswani, Chairman & Managing Director of Lemon Tree Hotels challenged his managers to find ways to employ the differently-abled and disadvantaged Indians because  “the brand should stand for more than ‘just profit’.” Lemon Tree is a large, successful and growing company encompassing several brands, 8,000 rooms in  91 hotels across 49 destinations; and it is committed to barrier-free employment. Their initiative started in 2007. By May 2018, approximately 21% of their employees were Indians who are opportunity deprived in some way. The interview with Aradhana Lal is available on demand during the Virtual WTM 10 & 11 November – it tells about the programme, explains how it was developed and discusses replication within and beyond the sector. more

 

 

8. Developments in Aviation
Bain & Company is predicting that demand for transatlantic flights will not recover until at least 2026, leaving the likes of British Airways and Virgin Atlantic particularly exposed. more Back at the beginning of October British Airway's last 'Queen of the Skies' Boeing 747 was flown into retirement. in 1998 there were 986 Boeing 747s in service around the world. Only 33 remain in passenger service, with 122 in storage, and nearly 300 in service flying cargo. The 747 helped make air travel more available to ordinary people.  more
At Virtual WTM (10th November 15:30) there is a panel on Decarbonising Aviation.

Airbus has announced that it is planning to evaluate three concept planes each of which would be primarily powered by hydrogen. The goal is to figure out an aircraft design and manufacturing process so the hydrogen plane could potentially enter commercial service by 2035. Hydrogen is energy-dense, plentiful and it burns cleanly, although it will create contrails which research suggests have a warming effect, trapping heat.  Hydrogen is highly flammable and will need stronger fuel tanks, requiring redesign of aircraft,  and new logistical infrastructure will be necessary to supply it.
The final decision on whether a hydrogen plane is ready for commercial service will “come down to the economics and the supportability and, quite frankly, our customer interest,” Amanda Simpson, Vice president for research and technology at Airbus Americas. said. “Showing the technology is feasible and that it’s economical is key.” more

9. Tourism and Wildlife
TRAFFIC has engaged in smart tourism technology through its Wildlife Witness App, created in partnership with the Taronga Zoo. The app allows tourists and locals to report wildlife trade by taking a photo, pinning the location of an incident, and sending the details to TRAFFIC. TRAFFIC has also partnered with Instagram on a programme that will warn people who hashtag selfies with certain animals about animal exploitation. more

Jane Goodall in conversation with G Adventures’ founder, Bruce Poon Tip, pointed out that "As the world got wealthier and more people started to travel, they were destroying the world by sheer numbers. Culturally and environmentally, travel was going wrong. ... “One of the things to avoid is more people - the secret is tourism that is controlled. The number of people that are allowed in, and how long they can stay, and that is tough, but it has to be,” said Dr Goodall. During the pandemic, poaching has increased and she argued that “This pandemic has shed light on the way we have mistreated and disrespected animals and the environment. We have brought this pandemic on ourselves by forcing animals into contact with humans as we destroy their habitat, hunting them, eating them, killing them, trafficking them, selling them for food for medicine, exotic pet trade, selling them as skins. And factory farms for domestic animals. All of these things create the perfect conditions for a pathogen, like a virus, to jump from an animal to a person.” more

Marius Swart, a safari guide since 1992, has written a powerful piece about the ethics of guiding around wildlife " Guest experience and ethical guiding are not mutually exclusive, but finding the balance is everyone’s responsibility, and this cannot be done under a cloud of ignorant complicit". Read the article in Africa Geographic here.

10. Miscellany

〉  Visit Durango (in Colorado)  has launched an Extended Stay marketing campaign inviting  visitors to “Extend their Stay to Play an Extra Day.” “Get More of Durango.”  The campaign doesn’t encourage new visitation but rather increases the economic impact of the visitors who are already there. As Rachel Brown of VisIt Durango explains "Because it does not actually increase the quantity of visitors who come to the area, there is minimal threat of new germs being introduced into our population. By encouraging these visitors to stay longer, we increase the economic impact without risking the safety of our residents. With visitors extending their stay the hotels win, the restaurant wins, and the local economy wins. Visit Durango’s mission is to increase overnight stays in the county, but this goal of economic impact should never be at the detriment of our locals’ quality of life." more

South Korea has launched "untact travel" which emphasises wide outdoor spaces, from botanic gardens (such as Hwadam, pictured above) to bamboo forests and golden sandy beaches. The term ‘untact’ was coined earlier this year from the longer phrase ‘undoing contact’ to describe any travel destination or experience designed to facilitate social distancing and reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19.  more

Nonprofit media platform Voices of Rural India has found a way to turn the COVID-19 crisis into an opportunity by upgrading digital skills among rural storytellers to create alternative livelihoods. more

〉 With the support of Global Legal Action Network (GLAN)  a group of Portuguese children and young adults have brought an unprecedented climate change case against 33* countries to the European Court of Human Rights. They are appealing for financial support. 


The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News

RT News Video Channel

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism October 2020 (2)

  1. Attend WTM, London - Be Carbon Zero
  2. Responsible Tourism at Virtual WTM,  10 & 11  November 2020 
  3. Looking ahead: Hope and Pledges 
  4. ABTA  roadmap for rebuilding travel and tourism
  5. Cape Town - where Responsible  Tourism was defined 
  6. Tourism Students Festival - India 16-17 October
  7. Narratives Matter - we must get beyond fatalism 
  8. Can testing get us back flying? 
  9. CommonPass
  10. Miscellany 

The next edition will be out at the beginning of November just before WTM
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

Register to attend WTM Virtual 9-11 November 2020

1. Attend WTM, London - Be Carbon Zero
Well, at least very low carbon. This year's London Travel Week is virtual, there is no need to travel to London nor to find board and lodging away from home. You can participate from anywhere in the world over the extended hours, the only carbon emitted will be from the electricity you and the internet consumes, and some of that is renewable. The speakers have not flown to London either.

2. Recover. Rebuild. Innovate: Responsible Tourism at WTM,  on 4th 10th  & 11th November 2020
Combined, WTM Virtual and London Travel Week, will offer an extensive conference programme of nearly 50 sessions streamed live online and on-demand with the majority of the sessions open to all. Register here.
The Responsible Tourism Programme is over 3 days of London Travel Week. The theme is: How can we make tourism better for communities, travellers and our sector? 
4th November 11:30-13:30: the World Responsible Tourism Awards, a keynote from Sir Tim Smit of the Eden Project, and interviews with Wolfgang Neumann, Martin Brackenbury, Justin Francis and JoAnna Haugen on the importance of narrative.
10th November: 4 live panels Resilience & Covid 19; Build Back Better;  Tourism and Biodiversity & Build Back Better
11th November: 4 live panels Responsible Tourism in India; Racism in Tourism; Certification and Consumer Choice & Can we make tourism better - a manifesto for change
10th & 11th, on-demand, employing the differently-abled an inspiring example from India,  and two panels on animal welfare.

3. Looking ahead: Hope and Pledges
Gloria Guevara, WTTC President & CEO has acknowledged that “Consumer uncertainty about the risk of exposure or concerns about being quarantined is a core problem,”  and expressed some optimism that “With rapid testing to replace quarantine requirements, enhanced contact tracing and industry-wide standards by sector that can be clearly communicated to the public, we can help alleviate many of those concerns.” So many of us are hoping that rapid testing on departure and arrival might enable aviation to recover and that an effective vaccine may be available soon.
Meanwhile, the pledges continue to come thick and fast. Carbon-neutral or carbon zero by 2050 when the people making these pledges will have passed on, they will not be alive to be held to account. Political leaders participating in the United Nations Summit on Biodiversity in September 2020, representing 77 countries from all regions and the European Union, have committed to reversing biodiversity loss by 2030. The pledge they signed accepts that we "are in a state of planetary emergency: the interdependent crises of biodiversity loss and ecosystem degradation and climate change - driven in large part by unsustainable production and consumption - require urgent and immediate global action." They have declared that in "endorsing this Pledge for Nature, we commit ourselves not simply to words, but to meaningful action and mutual accountability to address the planetary emergency. It marks a turning point and comes with an explicit recognition that we will be judged now and by future generations on our willingness and ability to meet its aims." The LEADERS’ PLEDGE FOR NATURE.
Undoubtedly they - and we - will be judged by our children. There have been so many pledges and turning points - will action on sufficient scale to make a difference follow this time?

4. ABTA roadmap for rebuilding travel and tourism
ABTA has just published Tourism for Good" creating economic and social value, sustaining jobs, supporting businesses and boosting inward investment not only for destinations where many livelihoods depend on tourism, but also ...  in the UK." They identify 9 core principles for action  amongst which are (1) tourism needs to be sustainable and resilient, able to withstand future shocks and
challenges; (3) alignments with the SDGs; (4) recognising the importance of collaboration; (5) urgently accelerating decarbonisation: (6) delivering value and net benefits for destinations and local communities; (7) protecting and enhancing the natural and cultural heritage assets; (7) respect for human rights throughout the value chain; (9) measurement and reporting of progress.

5. Cape Town - where Responsible  Tourism was defined
The Tourism Development Framework  (TDF) outlines a Responsible Tourism approach to benefit communities and future generations by creating jobs and promoting social upliftment through tourism. Alderman James Vos is planning to use the TDF post-Covid-19  "as a driving force to push tourism development to all corners of the city by ensuring visitor comfort; improving and diversifying products and experiences; stimulating demand; supporting and involving communities so that they benefit; as well as planning and organising for growth." more

 

6. Tourism Students Festival - India 16-17 October

Their vision is to connect the students of tourism, faculty and industry leaders under one umbrella, to create a bridge between the curriculum and the industry practices at large, to mutually learn, unlearn and relearn and to address the challenges of our changing world. Find out more and enrol here
Responsible Tourism is growing in India. Businesses and states have done well in the WTM, World Responsible Tourism Awards since RT arrived in Kerala in 2008 with the 2nd International Conference on Responsible Tourism in Destinations.
The Kerala RT Mission has become internationally famous for its programmes, ensuring that rural communities secure significant additional incomes from tourism. CGH Earth Hotels originated in Kerala, and they along with the RT Mission have uniquely in India been awarded the coveted World Responsible Tourism Awards. Judges' Award - only five have been awarded, three in Africa and two in India. Madhya Pradesh has adopted RT as a major part of its state policy the new national tourism strategy also endorses a Responsible Tourism approach.

7. Narratives Matter - we must get beyond fatalism
We understand the world thought the stories we tell about how we got to where we are, that is how we explain who and where we are to ourselves and others. Our experiences and our understanding of it inform our preferences and prejudices and shape our vision for the future. We are a storytelling species, some of us tell stories better than others but we all hold stories in our minds, they determine our understanding of cause and effect how we came to be where we are and how we can get to where we want to go. JoAnna Haugen is a storyteller and a passionate advocate for better tourism. JoAnna writes "I feel optimistic because it is the only way we can afford to feel about tourism’s future."  She goes on "People have every reason to feel angry, frustrated, sad, lost, and utterly overwhelmed. If you feel this way, your feelings are valid, legitimate, respected, and completely okay." 

JoAnna is right "the world we find ourselves at this moment is the perfect recipe for fatalism" As she argues we cannot afford to give in to this fatalism:

"Our world is in desperate need of leaders who put people and the planet before profits. We need to live and work with an intentional focus on sustainability so that it becomes the default condition in our world. It must become a priority to dismantle the oppressive and racist foundations that countries and companies are built upon and the tourism industry operates in."

Read more about JoAnna and her work here  You can hear her interviewed about storytelling for change on November 4th at WTM London

8  Can testing get us back flying?
IATA is calling for all departing air passengers to be tested for coronavirus so that existing quarantine systems can be scrapped. IATA Director General Alexandre de Juniac has acknowledged that presently coronavirus test results take several hours and are expensive, but de Juniac claimed fast-acting antigen tests costing from $7 each are to be available ‘within weeks’. By “signalling now that this is the industry’s preferred option, we are sending a strong message to the market that should accelerate development and earmark aviation as a big customer.” John Holland-Kaye, CEO, Heathrow Airport, argues that: “Testing is the lifeline that the UK’s aviation sector needs to get back on its feet. We’ve put some of the most cutting-edge rapid testing technologies into action at Heathrow to see which offers the best solution.”    A coordinated introduction of testing is required with the support of governments. more

9 CommonPass

The World Economic Forum is working with The Commons Project to develop a global, interoperable framework to safely restore cross-border travel to pre-pandemic levels. CommonPass aims to develop and launch a standard global model to enable people to securely document and present their COVID-19 status (either as test results or an eventual vaccination status) to facilitate international travel and border crossing while keeping their health information private. Recognizing that countries will make sovereign decisions on border entry and health screening requirements, including whether or not to require tests or what type of test to require, CommonPass serves as a neutral platform which creates the interoperability needed for the various 'travel bubbles' to connect and for countries to trust one another's data by leveraging global standards. For governments, airlines, airports, and other key stakeholders throughout the end-to-end travel journey, CommonPass aims to address these key questions:

  • How can a lab result or vaccination record from another country be trusted?
  • Is the lab or vaccination facility accredited/certified?
  • How do we confirm that the person who took the test is indeed the person who is travelling?
  • Does the traveller meet border entry requirements?

10. Miscellany

  • Coronavirus: Study reveals where to sit on a flight to avoid the disease more
  • Germany wants binding quota for CO2-free jet fuel: draft law more
  • Oxfam discussion paper, Removing Carbon Now, that examines how companies and individuals can fund negative emissions technologies in an effective way.

  • Recording of Climework’s Direct Air Capture Summit, includes a panel discussion with Global Thermostat, Climeworks and Carbon Engineering.


The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News

RT News Video Channel

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism October 2020 (1)

  1. Launch of the Sustainable Hospitality Alliance 
  2. Responsible Tourism at Virtual WTM,  10 & 11  November 2020 
  3. Biodiversity and tourism, conflict or symbiosis, friend or foe?  
  4. Responsible Tourism Grows in India 
  5. Cruise Lines Face Particular Challenges: Covid-19 & Friends of the Earth
  6. Diversity Matters
  7. Action on Holiday Rentals 
  8. Action on Plastic 
  9. Animal cruelty rankings revealed: which travel companies are fuelling or fighting it?
  10. Miscellany 

The next edition will be out in mid-October
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

1. Launch of the Sustainable Hospitality Alliance
On October 1st the International Tourism Partnership (ITP) was relaunched as the Sustainable Hospitality Alliance (SHA), now once again fully independent. It was back in 2004 that the original International Hotels Environment Initiative founded at the time of the first Rio Summitt on Environment and Development in 1992 became the ITP which worked across a broad agenda: environment, siting and design guidelines for hotels,  the Youth Career Initiative (YCI), pioneering work on human rights.   The SHA is registered in the UK as a charity and will build on the work of the ITP with a strong commitment to working across the sector and to sharing their tools and resources work. In the video senior figures from Hilton, Marriott and IHG discussed key issues, including the future of sustainable development in the industry and hospitality’s role within the community during and following the pandemic. The Sustainable Hospitality Alliance brings together 14 of the world’s leading hotel companies and has launched with a renewed vision of responsible hospitality for a better world. Alliance members have  25% of the global hotel industry by rooms, including Marriott International, Hilton, IHG, Hyatt and Radisson. Aligned with the UN SDGs they commit to driving continued action on human rightsyouth employmentclimate change and water stewardship. more

2. Responsible Tourism at Virtual WTM,  10 & 11  November 2020 

This year we have eight live panels in Virtual WTM, four on each day. The details of all eight panels are online.  There will also be some on-demand panels and interviews details of these later in the month. There are two existential crises confronting our species: climate change and biodiversity loss. The UK's Prince Charles speaking at the opening of Climate Week has pointed out that the coronavirus is a 'wake-up call we cannot ignore' and that the looming environmental crisis will “dwarf” the damage wrought by coronavirus if the world misses the opportunity to “reset”. Does the  Covid-19 pandemic provide a “window of opportunity” to change the world for the better? That is the question we are asking this year. The of WTM this year is Recover, Rebuild, Innovate.  We begin by considering how our sector has responded to the pandemic in a panel moderated by Martin Brackenbury on Resilience & Covid-19 (1) The second panel consider how we might Build Back Better (2) looking at five leading examples of destinations already on the road to building back better. Our third panel looks at the biodiversity challenge: Tourism and Biodiversity, Friend or Foe (3), see the item below.

On 21st September Airbus revealed three concepts for new ZEROe zero-emission aircraft. There is little detail beyond a commitment to have the first in the sky by 2035.  As Guillaume Faury, Airbus CEO has reminded us “The transition to hydrogen, as the primary power source for these concept planes, will require decisive action from the entire aviation ecosystem. Together with the support from government and industrial partners, we can rise up to this challenge to scale-up renewable energy and hydrogen for the sustainable future of the aviation industry.” At WTM we are focussing this year on Decarbonising Aviation (4) and asking what the travel and tourism sector can do to contribute to pollution-free flight and to maintain the pressure for change. The aviation industry is our sector’s Achilles’ heel. Planes commissioned this year are expected still to be flying in 2050 – the time to change is now, and in a panel on aviation, tourism will be challenging aviation to clean up.

We have a panel on Tourism and Racism (6), chaired by the author Alex Tremblador. Some will be shocked by this arguing that discrimination in the sector is rare; others will disagree. Tour operators, travel agents, OTAs and guides offer what the consumer wants to buy – if they do not, then they fail. But client expectations change and perhaps we have a responsibility to reveal the whole truth, warts and all. The National Trust in England has for several years been revealing the origins of the wealth which enabled the building of grand houses and monuments; including “the global slave trades, goods and products of enslaved labour, abolition and protest, and the East India Company.” more  Alex Temblador has written an article reflecting on the range of perspectives on the issue which emerge from the series of video interviews recorded on tourism and racism and to be found on this playlist. 

Real progress is being made in India as more states and the National Ministry of Tourism take up the core ideas of Responsible Tourism, we discuss this with Indian leaders in a panel on Responsible Tourism in India (5), there are more details of developments on the subcontinent below.  We have a panel on Certification and Consumer Choice (7) we discuss where certification is today and what it holds for the future. Are there too many schemes? What strategies could deliver more transparent consumer information? What can be done to improve certification and drive the sustainability agenda forward? How will health and safety shape sustainable tourism? In our final panel, we tackle the key question and ask Can we make tourism better? (8) The question is in part rhetorical. Of course, we can, we know what needs to be done, but will we do what needs to be done? 

3. Biodiversity and tourism, conflict or symbiosis, friend or foe?
The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Living Planet Report 2020, published in September, sounds the alarm for global biodiversity, showing an average 68% decline in animal population sizes tracked over 46 years (1970-2016). It reports that this catastrophic decline is largely due to the environmental destruction,  such as deforestation, unsustainable agriculture and the illegal wildlife trade that contributes to virus outbreaks such as COVID-19. Marco Lambertini, Director General of WWF International, makes the point starkly: "We can’t ignore the evidence – these serious declines in wildlife species populations are an indicator that nature is unravelling and that our planet is flashing red warning signs of systems failure. .... it is now more important than ever to take unprecedented and coordinated global action to halt and reverse the loss of biodiversity and wildlife populations across the globe by the end of the decade, and protect our future health and livelihoods. Our own survival increasingly depends on it.” We cannot shield from climate change and biodiversity loss, we have to accept and come to terms with the fact that we are part of nature, we destroy it at our peril.   As WWF-US President and CEO Carter Roberts, points out: "We cannot shield humanity from the impacts of environmental destruction. It’s time to restore our broken relationship with nature for the benefit of species and people alike"

McKinsey has published a report mapping areas where nature appears to have particularly high value and analysing some of the co-benefits and costs that could result from conservation of these areas. These additional prioritized areas would effectively double the current conservation of land and national waters to 30% of the planet—a proposed UN target used as a reference point for this analysis. Recognising that biodiversity loss and climate change are the twin existential challenges that we face as humanity WTM, London has worked with the World Tourism Forum Lucerne to record a series of interviews with leaders addressing what tourism can do to reduce biodiversity loss. At WTM London at 14:00 on November 10thShaun Vorster will be moderating a panel on these issues. The Responsible Tourism programme this year at WTM is online, so you will not need to travel to London to join us. This will be a lively panel exploring what the industry can do to halt the loss and ensure positive social and environmental footprints.

4. Responsible Tourism Grows in India
Kerala committed to Responsible Tourism in 2008 and has become a world leader in ensuring that the local communities benefit economically from domestic and international visitors, particularly, but not only, in rural areas. Madhya Pradesh has adopted a similar tourism policy and implementation strategy. At the national level, the Ministry of Tourism has a draft policy out for consultation. As the Ministry writes (4.2): "Sustainable Tourism is all about minimizing the negative impact of tourism on social, environmental and economic aspects and maximizing the positive impact. Responsible Tourism is about taking responsibility by all Stakeholders for achieving sustainable tourism, and to create better places for people to live in and for people to visit. The Ministry is funding initiatives to bring tourism to rural areas to contribute to rural livelihoods through the development of rural circuits under the Swadesh Darshan Scheme.  The Ministry of Rural Development seeks through their Shyama Prasad Mukherji Rurban Mission (SPMRM) to develop "clusters of villages that preserve and nurture the essence of rural community life with a focus on equity and inclusiveness without compromising with the facilities perceived to be essentially urban in nature, thus creating a cluster of “Rurban Villages”. more

NotOnMap and Help Tourism in association the with ICRT India are developing 150+ training videos in 18 Indian languages divided into 12 training modules for Homestays, Village Panchayats, Teachers, Youth and Wome. It is all free and open-source and there are plans to reach 100,000 villages over the next year. The training material has been developed in three months and is based on 30 webinars which engaged with 2000 community members and fifty organisations over 17 states in India. In Kerala, the DTPC   is promoting self-sufficiency by providing fish gardens. The World Responsible Tourism Awards have recognised many examples of RT in India and CGH Earth Hotels and Kerala RTT Mission have won the coveted Judges' Award these awards are rare and are used to recognise businesses which achieve in multiple categories and have been previously recognised a number of times.  There is a panel on RT in India at the Virtual WTM on 11th November at 10:30 UK time. 

5. Cruise Lines Face Particular Challenges: Covid-19 & Friends of the Earth
It will be at least another month before cruise liens are allowed to operate in US waters. According to CDC reports, between March 1 and September 29 data showed at least 3,689 Covid-19 or Covid-like illnesses on cruise ships in US waters, with at least 41 reported deaths. The agency warned that “these numbers are likely incomplete and an underestimate.”
British nationals are advised by the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development against any sea-going cruise travel. “On cruise ships, passengers and crew share spaces that are more crowded than most urban settings,” said the CDC. “Data show that when only essential crew are on board, ongoing spread of SARS-CoV-2 still occurs. If unrestricted cruise ship passenger operations were permitted to resume, passengers and crew on board would be at increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and those that work or travel on cruise ships would place substantial unnecessary risk on healthcare workers, port personnel and federal partners [...] and the communities they return to.” more
The UK government has begun talking with the industry about how it might operate in a Covid world, the industry has developed a cruise framework is similar to the 'Interim Guidance for Restarting Cruise Operations’ released by the European Union in July, CLIA admitted, with some of the best practices taken and adapted in line with British rules and regulations. The Framework brings together three documents, focused on operators,  the management of seafarers, and advice for passengers prior to their cruise. The industry is endeavouring to replicate at sea the government's onshore regulations and advice.

Friends of the Earth has published a report card comparing the environmental footprint of 18 major cruise lines and 193 cruise ships, examining sewage treatment, air pollution reduction, water quality compliance, transparency and criminal violations. The industry's response is covered in USA Today Travel.

 

6. Diversity Matters
 Mejdi Tours are leaders in socially conscious tourism and the originators of the Dual Narrative Tour ™, with two guides, one from each side of the conflict. They are the world’s leading experts on post-conflict tourism now operating tours in 20 countries.  At WTM London in November 2019 Aziz Abu Sarah, co-founder of Mejdi Tours, made a simple but profound point “The mistake is to think travel is about distance,” he said. “Travel is about change. It is about discovering difference.” At the heart of travel and tourism is difference. As the pandemic struck America and the Black Lives Matter movement raised issues of racism, Mejdi started a live stream weekly travel show hosted by Aziz to continue to educate travellers about responsible tourism. They have produced a host of programmes about Crossing Boundaries and offering others in responsible travel and peacebuilding a platform.  There are now 31 episodes freely available online. "Through shared stories and conversations" the programme  aim "to continue connecting our world during these challenging times⁠—allowing us to travel from the comfort of our homes." Their pitch is powerful " Join us as we engage our guest speakers in conversation, discuss difficult questions, model friendship through respectful dialogue and disagreement, and provide an opportunity to encounter new voices and perspectives." more

7. Action on Holiday Rentals
The development of new platforms which facilitate the short term letting of accommodation to tourists had had a major impact on the availability of rental accommodation to residents in many European cities. In the Uk estate agents, RightMove has moved in the short letting market. "The rise and high profitability of STHR has led to a widespread pattern of long term housing rentals being converted into STHR. The impact on prices and the supply of affordable housing is alarming, particularly in inner cities. European citizens are increasingly voicing their concerns about nuisances caused by STHR. In addition to the adverse effects on the liveability of certain neighbourhoods and soaring prices, they report noise disturbance, health hazards, and even the slow disappearance of convenience stores." European cities are p[ressign for appropriate safeguards to be included in the new EU Digital Services Act more
Glasgow City Council is seeking a first-of-its-kind court interdict to shut a short-term rental property which will not comply with enforcement. A property on Victoria Road in Glasgow’s southside was ordered to shut last year after complaints of noise and anti-social behaviour but is still being advertised. In Poland, Airbnb and the City of Krakow have announced that they have signed a “landmark” partnership to support and promote responsible tourism and exchange aggregated data about travel and tourism.

8. Action on Plastic
Keeping guests safe from Covid-19 has significantly increased the quantity of single-use plastic going to waste. Travel Without Plastic has created GreenerGuest which offers a free course introducing a host of ways to reduce or eliminate unnecessary single-use plastic from business and providing access to more sustainable alternatives products.  All of their suppliers have been selected for their commitments to social and environmental responsibility.
The Global Tourism Plastics Initiative has published recommendations on how the industry can continue fighting plastic pollution during the COVID-19 recovery. Download the recommendations here.  The document builds on the key concepts underlying the common vision for a circular economy for plastic. 

9.  Animal cruelty rankings revealed: which travel companies are fuelling or fighting it?
World Animal Protection's report, Tracking the travel industry, exposes the companies that promote animal cruelty through the tours and excursions they sell, and those that are winning for wildlife, such as Airbnb, which scored the highest. Global tourist polls have shown there’s great customer appetite for this. 85% of respondents interviewed believe travel companies should avoid activities that involve wild animals suffering. The research, undertaken by the University of Surrey in the UK and commissioned by WAP independently analysed the public commitments travel companies have and haven’t made, and ranked them in order. The companies assessed: Airbnb, AttractionTickets.com, Booking.com, DER Touristik, Expedia, Flight Centre, GetYourGuide, Klook, Musement, The Travel Corporation, Tripadvisor, TUI.co.uk, Trip.com and Viator.

Companies were scored across four key areas:  1) Commitment: Availability and quality of published animal welfare policies and how applicable they are to all their brands. 2) Targets and performance: Availability and scope of published time-bound targets and reports on progress towards meeting animal welfare commitments.   3) Changing industry supply:  Availability and quality of engagement with suppliers and the overall industry, to implement wildlife-friendly changes.  4) Changing consumer demand:  Availability and quality of educational animal welfare content and tools to empower consumers to make wildlife-friendly travel choices.  more

10. Miscellany

  • Travel Tomorrow is collecting and publishing the Covid-19 safety measures that  EU countries are applying to travellers wanting to visit.
  • SUNx Malta in partnership with the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) has launched the Climate Friendly Travel Registry for 2050 Climate Neutral & Sustainability Ambitions
  • Slovenia’s Bohinj region has asked tourists planning to visit to treat the destination as a living room or otherwise avoid the region altogether. This approach likens tourism to a living room - in a living room the owner combines items to create a pleasant environment for both himself and his guests. The Bohinj team believe that tourism destinations should offer the same sense of place and that mutual trust between local people and respectful travellers will lead to uniquely special travel experiences. more
  • Celebration Earth   CelebrationEarth! sets out to remind us that there are successes in this time of change and fear, that there are groups all over the country and all over the world-changing their environment for the better. Without dismissing the urgency or peril of current environmental change, we can approach it with a determination that comes as much from delight in the world around us as from fear of what might be happening.

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News

RT News Video Channel

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism September 2020 (1)

  1. Learning to Live with Covid-19
  2. Tourism and Racism
  3. Climate Change is still THE Existential Issue
  4. Biodiversity, Habitat & Wildlife 
  5. Sustainable Aviation
  6. The New Air Safety Agenda
  7. Rebuild Tourism - better?
  8. How ethical is a staycation?
  9. The Housing Crisis 
  10. Miscellany 

The next edition will be out in mid-September
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

1. Learning to Live with Covid-19
As Simon Press, Senior Director at WTM London has pointed out: "Companies are now in survival mode and shifting priorities to protecting revenue, reducing costs and maintaining existing customers. Transparency and Trust are key... The crisis is devastating, but the forced pause of the industry does provide an important chance to rethink tourism, and hopefully rebuild in a better way."

Iberostar is offering free medical insurance on every direct booking.   The "Dominican Republic Eliminates Mandatory COVID-19 Tests, Adds Free Insurance As Part of New Tourism Recovery Plan" more

At the virtual WTM, London in November we shall be addressing the core challenge that confronts our sector: How do we build back better after the damage done to our sector by Covid-19. Trust is the new currency of tourism.  Travellers and holidaymakers are understandably nervous about the threat of Coviod-19 to their health and the risk of being trapped abroad or required to quarantine on return. There will be a post-Covid new normal, today's industry leaders will shape it, but in a much more difficult environment. In the July 18 edition of RT News we reported the European poll evidence from MORI ib people's willingness to travel and the attitudes of residents in Europe to international arrivals. The survey revealed the unwillingness of people to travel abroad and to allow in foreign tourists.  The YouGov researchers concluded that "the vast majority of people who might normally consider going somewhere on holiday are refusing to do so specifically because of coronavirus.." Take a look at the detailed data on the YouGov website

2. Tourism and Racism

The Black Lives Matter movement has been a powerful reminder of the ways in which institutional and structural racism shape the way we think and affect what we see. There will be a panel focused on Tourism and Racism as part of the virtual Responsible Tourism programme at WTM, London in November. There is a very much reduced virtual Responsible Tourism programme this year so we are keen to enable voices to be heard in the run-up to the November panel and to continue afterwards. There is already a series of interviews here on YouTube.

The Black Travel Alliance was formed to "hold destinations and travel brands accountable on the issue of diversity in travel marketing and storytelling." Their training and business support is built on three pillars: Alliance. Amplification. Accountability. The Alliance strives to "create a world where Black people are supported and accurately represented in the travel industry."  Racism is an issue that touches every aspect of our industry from employment, through guiding and itineraries to marketing.

Alex Temblador talks about Allyship, why it matters, how to do it and about making travel better.  Allyship matters because once we acknowledge that we have privileges, we need to ensure that we use these privileges to improve the lives of others.   Alex wrote a very perceptive article for Conde Nast Traveller back in August about the questions any anti-racist traveller should ask themselves. The questions a traveller should ask apply too to itinerary planning and destination marketing. Alex also explains clearly the difference between cultural appropriation and appreciation. Once you can see the difference you realise how large the chasm is between them, between the good and the bad.  There is a recorded webinar on opportunities to promote African destinations to the international diaspora and Pan-African, it was part of Africa Travel Week.

3. Climate Change is still THE Existential Issue
Planet Earth has lost 28 trillion tonnes of ice in less than 30 years meaning that sea level rises, triggered by melting glaciers and ice sheets, could reach a metre by the end of the century. Every centimetre of sea-level rise means about a million people will be displaced from their low-lying homelands. The end of the century is one live time away, more victims of climate change are born every day. A forty-year study has revealed that the Arctic Ocean is warming by a degree every decade, the highest rise since the last Ice Age. Over the Barents Sea and around Norway's Svalbard archipelago temperatures have increased by 1.5 degrees per decade throughout the period. Arctic temperatures are rising faster than expected.

Our planet is burning. Carbon emissions from this year's wildfires burning in the Arctic Circle have already outstripped 2019's record levels and are the highest for the region in data going back to 2003. They are up one third on emissions in 2019. more

The Amazon is burning once again and reports say this year could be more devastating than 2019. But there is some good news at last! NASA-funded researchers have developed a new tool which now makes it easier for authorities and other stakeholders to track the types of fires that are burning, the locations they are burning in, and the risks they pose.  Douglas Morton, chief of the Biospheric Sciences Laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, reports that there is " little evidence that the burning moratorium has had an impact. Instead, there is a noticeable increase in fire activity since the moratorium went into effect on July 15, ... ”large numbers of the fires in those states are clearly deforestation—not small-scale agricultural fires.” More

The climate change threat is not diminishing, it is accelerating. It is having real impacts now and we cannot self-isolate to escape its consequences. It is one thing to be worried about an issue and quite something else to do anything about it. It is quite disturbing to hear that only 64% of consumers globally are concerned about climate change. Just this month we have evidence that temperatures in the Arctic Ocean between Canada, Russia and Europe are warming faster than predicted. 28 trillion tonnes of ice have disappeared from the surface of the Earth since 1994, and sea-level rise could be a metre by the time a baby born this year reaches 80. Carbon emissions from this year’s wildfires burning in the Arctic Circle have already outstripped 2019’s record levels, and the Amazon is on fire again. Climate change is a much more significant threat than COVID-19 and much more challenging to deal with. The industry has been slow to respond and to take responsibility to address climate change "Individual businesses and airlines see little, if any, first-mover advantage in reducing their emissions. To do so costs money and risks their being beaten on price by those who refuse to act without compulsion." more

4 Biodiversity, Habitat & Wildlife
One of the consequences of climate change, change to which the travel industry contributes, is habitat and biodiversity loss.  Global warming is an existential threat to us, and to thousands of other species. WTM has partnered with the World Tourism Forum Lucerne (WTFL) to explore how tourism can reduce its negative impacts on biodiversity and have a positive impact – economic, social and ecological.

Founded in Zimbabwe by former Australian special forces soldier and anti-poaching leader Damien Mander, the women-only team of rangers, drawn from the abused and marginalised, is revolutionising the way animals are protected, communities are empowered— and its members’ own lives are being transformed. Mander’s innovative approach to conservation calls for community buy-in rather than full-on armed assault against poachers. If a community understands the economic benefits of preserving animals, then it will eliminate poaching without an armed struggle. AKASHINGA: THE BRAVE ONES is a celebration of the courage, conservation and unorthodox thinking that’s leading to massive positive change. Watch the film here. 

Kenya's Sustainable Travel Tourism Agenda STTA has asked the rhetorical question: Where should the buck stop when clients misbehave when on safari or on any holiday? They conclude that the buck stops with the tour company. Ultimately, a truly responsible tourism company has the opportunity to influence the behavior of its clients and supply chain because the organization's identity and values will be evident at every point of interaction. Read their reasons here. 

There will be a panel, with WTFL, on Biodiversity, eco-system services and tourism - conflict or symbiosis? at the virtual WTM in November.

5
Sustainable Aviation
Many readers of RT News will remember Jane Ashton when she was at TUI, she moved on to EasyJet where she is sustainability director. Recognising the increasing debate about climate change and the need for urgent action Ashton has pointed ou that "all companies will need a clear vision and plan to address" it, and that the aviation industry must “reinvent itself and…move to electric and hybrid aircraft powered by renewable energy.” She argues further that “airlines and destinations should work together to make more sustainable choices.”  “Airlines, destinations and tourism bodies can also together help to ensure that governments have the right policies in place which support investment in new technology and incentivise more sustainable behaviour,” more

The Boeing 747, the much loved Jumbo jet 747 is beginning to be withdrawn from service although. It first flew before the 1969 Moon landing and they have carried the Space Shuttle on their backs. Aircraft are long term investments and the carbon polluting aircraft being built now will still be flying long after 2050, unless ss they are scrapped by government edict.  BA is to retire its fleet of 31 Boeing 747s with immediate effect. more Ryan Air has cut its capacity by a fifth as bookings weaken and announced that it will shut its bases at London Stansted, Southend and Newcastle. more

There will be a panel on decarbonising aviation in the Responsible Tourism virtual programme at WTM, London in November 

6 The New Air Safety Agenda
Seven people from three different parties on Tui flight 6215 from Zante to Cardiff on Tuesday 25th August tested positive for Covid-19. Stephanie Whitfield, from Cardiff, who was on the flight with her partner, told the BBC: "This flight was a debacle. The chap next to me had his mask around his neck. Not only did the airline not pull him up on it, they gave him a free drink when he said he knew a member of the crew. "Loads of people were taking their masks off and wandering up and down the aisles to talk to others. "As soon as the flight landed, a load of people took their masks off immediately. The flight was full of selfish 'covidiots' and an inept crew who couldn't care less." more

In early July nearly two-thirds of the public (64%) said that they would not feel safe travelling by plane, up from 40% on 8 June. more The aviation sector from check-in to the taxi rank in the destination is challenged to ensure client safety, it is no longer just about safety in the air although that remains a big part of it. The pandemic has created a new reason to fear flying. Trust has become the new currency of tourism.

In the UK the Daily Telegraph is backing a campaign by the travel and tourism industry to put in place a Test, Track and Isolate system.  Collaborative testing between states could create a protective corridor to permit international travel, just as security screening does. The LAMP test costs €38, completed the day before or on the day of departure covers the passenger for 72 hours through a digitally secure iWarrant. This is a ‘lab in a box’ solution using Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) technology, and it is I fully CE/IVD certified for use in human diagnostics. more

National Geographic had an article back in January about how virus's spread on planes. The research reported there suggests that window seats are safest. The peer-reviewed research paper produced by The FlyHealthy Research Team on Behaviors, movements, and transmission of droplet-mediated respiratory diseases during transcontinental airline flights published in 2018 is available online.

Eurowings has launched a bookable middle seat from €18

7. Rebuild Tourism - better?

Anastasia Miari writing for The National in the Middle East has asked Will the pandemic turn us into more conscious travellers?   As she argues one demand changes so will supply, but the industry can also make change by developing new products, offering new experiences to attract travellers and holidaymakers. It is too early to tell to what extent people's preferences will have been impacted by the pandemic. But for sure it will vary within source markets and between then.

The World Bank points out that this pandemic is far greater than the SARS outbreak in the early 2000s. There are now twice as many international arrivals – and domestic tourism has grown too. Second, “the emergence of social media as a means of sharing information is compounding uncertainty and has led to heightened anxiety in relation to travel.” And third, for the first time in history, the number of people over the age of 64 is higher than the number of children under the age of five. The authors of the World Bank report foresee:

  • Tourism recovery will be uneven.
  • Demand for particular tourism products/segments may be reshaped leading to new forms.
  • Consolidation of major operators in varied segments is likely, starting with airlines and hotels.
  • More liquid and agile players who can withstand the severity of the downturn could have a significant impact on how countries emerge.
  • Governments will be conflicted. (As businesses struggle to recover governments will be looking to tax them)
  • Many businesses that were directly or indirectly connected to tourism will need assistance to survive.
  • As the effects of the pandemic continue, it will be increasingly difficult to support all firms.
  • Governments will need to be aware of the trade-offs they face in determining policy responses.

As the authors point out “while the timing of reopening borders will have a large impact on the survival of the sector, it can also damage destination credibility if done too early and infections increase.” There is perhaps nothing very surprising here – but it is sobering to see the challenges listed out. The report goes on to give much detailed practical advice to World Bank clients – it is valuable for governments and destinations.
There will be panels on Resilience and Recovery &  Building Back Better in the Responsible Tourism virtual programme at WTM, London in November 

8. How ethical is a staycation?
Flora Samuel, a professor of architecture at the University of Reading and an expert on social value has reflected on the ethics of second homes in the journal Building Design. She recounts how during an Airbnb holiday in Wales she learnt from the neighbours about how "anti-social alterations had been cynically done to the house without planning permission in full knowledge that the local authority would be pretty toothless to remedy them. Its “superhosts”, portrayed as a cosy local couple on the website, was actually a property developer residing in another country."  As she argues these property companies do "offer local employment it is of the most menial type, seasonal and vulnerable when it comes to the pandemic (my friend will be made redundant after furlough). Perhaps going to a UK holiday home isn’t the responsible tourism it might at first appear to be." She concludes "we have to put the heart back into communities and look closely at the social value of our holiday destinations."

9. The Housing Crisis
The Telegraph reports that the collapse of the short term letting market fueled by tourists is leading in London "to a glut of new long-term rental properties which is dramatically driving down prices. Hamptons International, an estate agent, reports that since May, 12% of homes coming onto the rental market in central London were previously short-term lets driving up availability on central London by 42% and causing rental prices to decline by 8.4%. In Northumberland the council is planning to help sustain the vitality of communities, in parishes where 20% or more of household spaces are identified in the latest Census as having no usual residents, a principal residency restriction will be applied to all new market dwellings, which will be secured through a section 106 agreement.”  This would effectively ban sales to buyers who cannot prove they live in an area for a majority of the year. St Ives in Cornwall and Fowey in Cornwall, as well as councils in Suffolk, Norfolk, Cumbria and Derbyshire, are all considering bans on the sale of houses as holiday homes. Barcelona has told landlords of empty flats to find tenants or the city will rent out the property as affordable housing.

10. Miscellany

  • Romanian tourists are overvisiting the remote village of Viscri in central Romania. 
    Sniffer dogs to check air passengers in Finland for COVID-19, experiment to be privately funded more
  • Local residents in the Maldives have won a campaign against developers and the government who wanted to turn Madivaru &  Madivaru Finolhu into a luxury resort. They argued the plan would have deprived local people of vital jobs and caused damage to coral reefs and the wider ecosystem. video
  • Visual Capitalist has produced a graphic showing the cities which in 2018  attracted the most international visitors who stayed for longer than 24 hrs. Hong Kong is still the most popular, although international tourist arrivals declined 4.2%, Bangkok is second, with an increase of 15.1%. London is third despite a decline of 1.4%

Upcoming Responsible Tourism Conferences, Events and Summer Schools

#rtdfinland 2021 5-6 June  Summer School 3-9 June in Helsinki and Jyväskylä
RT Unite Monthly Meetings


The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

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Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

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Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Better Tourism Africa
Responsible Traveller, South Africa
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Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

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Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

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Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

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Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 06/2020

  1. Covid-19 remains a crisis in many parts of the world
  2. The World Responsible Tourism Awards in the Year of Covid-19
  3. Tourism in a Covid World 
  4. Decarbonising Aviation 
  5. Racism in Tourism
  6. Responsible Tourism in India
  7. Build Back Better?
  8. Wildlife & Biodiversity 
  9. Travel Tomorrow
  10. Involving your clients in sustainability

    There is now so much news that from July Responsible Tourism News will be published fortnightly on or around the 15th and the end of the month. 


Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on RT. 

1. Covid-19 remains a crisis in many parts of the world
As The Economist pointed out at the beginning of the month poorer countries account for some three-quarters of the 100,000 or so new cases detected around the world each day. "Richer countries can do much to help. Some stricken places will need donations of simple supplies like testing kits and protective gear. Others will need debt relief, to free money to fight the disease." The tourism industry and our clients could help too. In the good times we sell these destinations, we should support them in the bad times too.
As this newsletter goes to pres there are close to 500,000 deaths and 10,000,000 confirmed case. The date is regularly updated on The Guardian website.

The Caribbean, Africa
At end of May Rafat Ali of Skift wrote that "we have to examine the controversial and unmistakable role of our industry of travel — the movement and the gathering of humans — in this, especially as the reopening of travel is gaining momentum every day. We can’t just hurtle into reopening with fingers in our ears. After all, our industry’s output, the globe of travelers, has been the biggest vectors of spreading the virus around the world. " And "We have to be willing to say that cruises were a super-spreader of the virus, despite knowing the risks of continuing with the sailings for weeks and months. We have to be willing to say restarting cruises early is the worst idea ever, and the industry’s biggest death wish if rebound “virus cruises” happen again." We should but will we?
As Steve Witt of Not Just Travel and The Travel Franchise has argued in Travel Weekly responsible travel must now embrace " our new found respect for freedom, health and each other’s space." And hopefully: "Responsible tourism means a greater respect and support for those in the tourism and hospitality industry who need to make a living with more costs and potentially less customers."
African tourism has been put on ice by coronavirus – here’s how some countries are reviving it more
In Indonesia the Covid-19 pandemic is challenging the survival of thousands of small and medium enterprises in tourism that will need creative crowdfunding philanthropic investment to stay afloat financially. more

WTM Responsible Tourism Awards

2. The World Responsible Tourism Awards in the Year of Covid-19
Covid has revealed the importance of tourism. When it stopped the contribution which tourism made, until the crisis,  to the livelihoods of local people and the maintenance of wildlife and habitat became all too apparent.  Some tourism businesses have taken responsibility and used their assets and their relationships with travellers, agents and suppliers to support communities and conservation. This year the World Responsible Tourism Awards have been refashioned to address the Covid-19 crisis. We are looking to recognise and commend those who have seen the impact of the crisis on communities and wildlife and responded.

There is a crisis: local people and wildlife dependent on tourism need your support
The Awards are open for nominations until 3rd August, you can nominate yourself and others simply by sending us a few details, and you can nominate as many times as you like.  Remember if you are not nominated, by yourself or someone else, you can't bb recognised or be commended.

3. Tourism in a Covid World
Hopefully there will be a vaccine and Covid will be controlled.  But for now, and for some time to come, we have to live with Covid-19.
WTTC has, with multiple partners, developed  'Safe Travels': Global Protocols & Stamp for the New Normal. #SAFETRAVELS. The protocols will be published  in phases  for at least eleven industries, including; Hospitality, Attractions, Outdoor Retail, Aviation, Airports, Short Term Rentals, Cruise, Tour Operators, Convention Centres and MICE, Car Rental and Insurance.
Inge Huijbrechts leading on the responsibility and safety & security agenda for the Radisson Hotel Group. Hear the latest thinking on post-Covid-19 hospitality, managing hotels and the supply chain and about advancing the responsibility agenda when resources are limited. video

Kempinski Hotels has produced a video explaining what they have done to ensure client and staff safety in their hotels.

The UNWTO has published a One Planet Vision for the Responsible Recovery of the Tourism Sector structured around six lines of action to guide responsible tourism recovery for people, planet and prosperity, namely public health, social inclusion, biodiversity conservation, climate action, circular economy and governance and finance. UNWTO's Global Guidelines to Restart Tourism were published at the end of May.

Spain has introduced a self-certification stamp of approval for businesses  which assert their compliance with official guidelines approved by the Ministry of Health. There no monitoring of compliance, but the seal must be renewed every year. more
In the UK VisitBritain has launched a ‘We’re Good To Go’ industry standard and supporting mark means businesses across the sector can demonstrate that they are adhering to the respective Government and public health guidance, have carried out a COVID-19 risk assessment and check they have the required processes in place. Coupled with a a ‘Know Before You Go’ public information campaign to support tourism in England as businesses start to re-open, reassuring visitors as restrictions are lifted by checking about what it is safe to do and when, and sign-posting to information about destinations and available services before travelling. more
Aran islanders have chose  ‘health over wealth’ as businesses remain shut, an Inis Oírr poll showed 92 per cent don’t want to risk a coronavirus outbreak with tourism return
Iceland is offering a choice: 14 days of quarantine or a a COVID-19 test upon arrival
St Lucia is implementing a responsible reopening plan 

4. Decarbonising Aviation
Arctic Circle temperatures have hit new highs reaching a scorching 38C (100F) in Verkhoyansk, a Siberian town. The Arctic is believed to be warming twice as fast as the global average. We cannot self isolate from climate change. Some airlines, for example KLM, have responded to challenge but most want to carry on with business as usual. In the UK Alok Sharma the the government minister responsible for business and climate change said earlier this month that "“COP26 can be a moment where the world unites behind a fairer, greener recovery from the effects of Covid-19. A recovery which delivers for both our people and our planet.” Hew was luancing the COP 26 Race to Zero UNFCC campaign.

The UK government has launched a Jet Zero Council:, a new collaborative initiative to decarbonise aviation;  a coalition of Ministers, businesses, trade bodies and environmental groups who will collaboratively work to align the aviation sector with the 2050 net-zero target. The UK Sustainable Aviation Coalition recently published a roadmap to achieve net-zero. Their roadmap focuses on fuel from waste, gives a low priority to electric aircraft and insists  that the UK’s aviation sector can grow by 70% over the next three decades without breaching climate targets – the UK Committee on Climate Change rejected this plan for business as usual.
For too long the aviation industry has been told that there is no alternative. TINA has been dominant. That is changing. There is an alternative. 
WTM hosted a symposium on  decarbonising aviation with presentations from leading research scientists, engineers and policy makers on the zero carbon fuels which are now within our reach. Aviation is not the problem. The problem is the dirty fuel they burn. The transition to clean fuels needs to begin now. Brief reports of the contributions from each of the speakers can be read here and videos of their presentations  are here.

5. Racism in Tourism
Alex Temblador has explained the problem eloquently. "The travel industry tends to think of itself as a space of leisure, fun, and escape where such things like racism are left behind for good times. The problem is, for black individuals and people of color, escaping racism is not something they can do by taking a vacation. Racism, like in many other sectors of society, has been built into the travel industry, both knowingly and unknowingly." more
The tourism industry needs to take responsibility and address racism throughout the sector. PwC and TTG have published a report arguing the business case for doing so. Download  Conde Nast Traveler  are reporting that the Black Travel Alliance has launched a  Black Travel Scorecard, which will evaluate destinations and travel brands under five key areas and they are promoting  Black-owned businesses, including tour groups like Experience Real Cartagena and African Lisbon Tours, which seek to amplify Black history or culture in a destination. Read the views of ten BAME people about the issues we need too address .

Justin Francis has described the broad agenda, changing attitudes, opening up travel, ensuring that more money finds its way into local hands,  finding ways to address and stop conscious or unconscious racist behaviour towards travellers of colour, ensuring that BAME communities are consulted about the impact tourism has on them. more

We need to take responsibility and address racism, in tourism 

6. Responsible Tourism in India
RT in India is often mistakenly assumed to exist only in Kerala. It is true that Kerala is the world's leading destination for RT but there are examples of award winning RT experiences all over the subcontinent. You can find a growing list of RT Award winners online.  ICRT India has a series of webinars with speakers from all over India. You can find details of the webinars on the Responsible Tourism Partnership website and set an alert to receive details.  In India as elsewhere "Community-based tourism organisations have been at the
forefront of providing relief to those most affected by the Covid-19 lockdown. They need your support to continue providing financial aid to help the most vulnerable." Details and donations here.

Manish Pande of Village Ways is one of the leading lights in the newly energetic ICRT India - there are a couple of interviews with her here. Rupesh Kumar has been widely recognised as a leader in RT having successfully led the RT Mission in Kerala since 2008. He too is a leader in the ICRT India, you can read an interview with him here. Incredible India is incredible in part for its rich diversity. Kerala locked down early and brought the virus under control. CGH Earth Hotels went further, Jose Dominic winner of a Judges' World Responsible Tourism Award characteristically went further than most. Out first and foremost responsibility is not the customer; it is our staff and people. We shut the hotels... We told all the employees to go home..." and maintain social distancing. more

Post-Covid Kerala is marketing to tier-II cities in south India. The campaign will project domestic travel as the best bet to break the lockdown fatigue among citizens. Kerala Tourism is planning to launch packages to extend length of stay through a focus on ‘learning experiences.’ Art, craft, culture, culinary skills amd martial arts are all planned. more The monsoon remains an under-marketed experience - enjoy it virtually.

7. Build Back Better?
The UNWTO's #TravelTomorrow message, "embraced by so many, is one of responsibility, hope and determination." However, with international arrivals estimated to be down by up to 80% this year there are plenty of people hoping that tourism will grow back better, in a greener and more sustainable way. The UNWTO's regional estimates are depressing/. WTTC is predicting 100m job losses with 75% of these in the G20 countries. Industry leaders, politicians, government and those who depend on tourism to feed themselves and their families. BAU, business as usual will be seen as the best way back. There are some signs of changes in a relatively few places and we should celebrate those, but this will be rare.  There is aspiration, for example in Thailand, is real, but delivery and implementation will be the bigger challenge.

In Venice Paola Mar, the city’s councillor for tourism is urging officials to use  the pause to rethink “an entire Venice system”, with sustainability and quality tourism at its core.
"Part of the plan is to lure locals back to live permanently in the city. The mayor is in discussions with universities, aiming to offer tourist rentals to students, and old buildings are being restored for social housing. Measures to control visitor numbers – including a tax on day trippers, which was due to be introduced in July – will go ahead next year, while the debate around cruise ships continues.   “Our goal is to trigger a renaissance of the city,” said Mar. “We want to attract visitors for longer stays and encourage a ‘slower’ type of tourism. Things can’t go back to how they were.”  more  The issue of overtoursm remains a major concern in Venice   Venice is empty and some want it to stay that way.

Venetian protesters formed a human chain along one of the city's iconic canals, demanding responsible tourism in the post-coronavirus period. Amsterdammers have launched petition to tackle overtourism. Launched on June 9th by 28 June there were close to 30,000 signatures. This proposal will now have to be considered by the city council. There is a broad citizens' movement to control tourism in Amsterdam. more
In Amsterdam the mayor urged extreme caution in reopening to tourists, while nonprofit group Amsterdam&Partners believes the tourist hiatus pushes to the top of the agenda plans to cut numbers, give Amsterdam back to locals and attract the “right” kind of visitor, and has launched a sustainability taskforce to map the way forward. “The main focus is that we want a sustainable visitor economy that doesn’t harm the livability of our city. If you have the right balance between living, working and visiting, you can have the right visitor economy. That’s what went wrong in the last years in the old city centre, and we have to entice locals to discover their city centre again.” more

Toronto in common with many cities in countries with a domestic tourism market the focus is on the local tourist. In Barcelona Mateo Asensioof the Barcelona tourist board. “Our first task is getting locals back out into the city, then the domestic market and our neighbours. When the international market returns, we’ll focus more on specific sectors. It’s an opportunity to change the rules.” more  Athens: two new bike lanes are to be created. The centre is being at least temporarily pedestrianised and the space made available for local restaurants, cafes and bars to expand. Prague is taking steps to rebrand itself as a cultural and gastronomic destination.  Berlin is introducing 14 miles of new bike lanes. Paris is increasing cycle lanes. There are fewer examples of initiatives outside of cities.

As Justin Francis has pointed out the  first rule of being a great city break destination is to focus on becoming the best place to live – and trust that tourism will follow.  The death of the office and the further depopulation of city centres is a major threat. Justin has published 11 steps to city resilience. How many will take them?

GLP Presents #TourismStrong Video Series. A series of hopeful and honest conversations to inspire you as they’ve inspired us. They have published a free report with key takeaways from their travel industry peers—TourismStrong: Insights to Survive & Thrive Post-COVID-19

8. Wildlife & Biodiversity
"Pandemics such as coronavirus are the result of humanity’s destruction of nature, according to leaders at the UN, WHO and WWF International, and the world has been ignoring this stark reality for decades." There has been a series of warnings since March, with the world’s leading biodiversity experts saying even more deadly disease outbreaks are likely in future unless the rampant destruction of the natural world is rapidly halted. more  We have seen many diseases emerge over the years – such as Zika, Aids, Sars and Ebola – and although they are quite different at first glance, they all originated from animal populations under conditions of severe environmental pressures. And they all illustrate that our destructive behaviour towards nature is endangering our own health – a stark reality we’ve been collectively ignoring for decades. Research indicates that most emerging infectious diseases are driven by human activities. more  World Animal Protection  organised 200 organizations to sign an open letter to the UN World Tourism Organisation urging them to call for all captive wildlife entertainment to be completely phased out of the global tourism industry. To minimise the risk of future pandemics, protect the health of tourists and tourism workers and to protect all wildlife species. Read the full open letter here.

The conservationist Chris Sandbrook spells out the problem, in stark terms: "The nature based tourism sector has collapsed, fieldwork is often impossible, and donors are withdrawing funds. This represents a serious challenge to conservation, which will endure for years to come. At the same time, there may be a glimmer of hope in that the situation could open up new possibilities for transformative change in relations between people and non-human nature."  He concludes "The covid-19 has triggered a crisis for public health, for biodiversity, for the economic system, and for the conservation sector. The world will never be quite the same again. The question is, what kind of world will emerge?"  What will the tourism sector contribute to secure the future of the wildlife and habitat which is such a key part of our sector but for which we have paid too little, for too long

In Thailand captive elephants are being led into the mountains to find food. more  The Spanish multinational company Iberostar Group has become the first tourism business to fund the Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI).

9. Travel Tomorrow
António Buscardini explains Travel Tomorrow balancing sustainability and economic recovery post C-19. The tourism of tomorrow will be rooted in local communities. In neighbourhoods , villages and cities that thrive, and as a result, enjoy welcoming enthusiastic visitors. A flourishing community is very much connected to its specific place; where people work together, where visitors feel at home and residents can nurture and share their love for the place. 

 

10. Involving your clients in sustainability
Christopher Warren, aka the Green Butler, explains why culture and engaging clients in responsibly managing their resource use is good for business.

 


The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News

RT Video Channel

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Better Tourism Africa
Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD  #RTourismNews

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