Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism September 2020 (2)

  1. Responsible Tourism at WTM, London November 2020
  2. Covid-19 will be with us for a while
  3. Cruiselines
  4. Cleaner Fuels 
  5. Tackling Climate Change Gathers Pace 
  6. Human Rights 
  7. Biodiversity 
  8. Covid-19 and Transforming Tourism
  9. The Economic Impact of the Pandemic
  10. Miscellany 

The next edition will be out at the beginning of October
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

  1. Responsible Tourism at WTM, London November 2020
    WTM 2016 BannerWTM, London will be entirely virtual this year. The theme is: Recover, Rebuild, Innovate. On November 4th this year's World Responsible Tourism Awards will be announced and there will be a series of interviews. There are eight live panel sessions on 10th and 11th November on Resilience: Coping with Covid-19; Efforts to Build Back Better; Biodiversity; Decarbonising Aviation; Responsible Tourism in India; Racism and Tourism; the Future of Certification and How to Make Tourism Better for tourists, businesses and communities.  There will also be a host of round table interviews and panels available on demand during what will be the world's biggest Responsible Tourism Event of the Year of Covid-19. This year, perhaps more than ever, we need to focus on the solutions, we need to find, share practical ways of using tourism to make better places to live in for us and for the species with which we share spaceship earth.

  2. Covid-19 will be with us for a while
    Only two destinations are without restrictions on international arrivals The latest analysis from UNWTO (September 1st)  found that a total of 115 destinations (53% of all destinations worldwide) have eased travel restrictions, an increase of 28 since 19 July. Of these, two have lifted all restrictions, while the remaining 113 continue to have certain restrictive measures in place. In countries with advanced economies, 79% of tourism destinations have eased restrictions. In emerging economies, only 47% of destinations have done so. 933 destinations (43% of the total) continue to have their borders completely closed to tourism, of which 27 have had their borders completely closed for at least 30 weeks.  More than half of destinations with full restrictions still in place are also highly dependent on aviation, with at least 70% of their tourist arrivals coming by air, causing significant connectivity impacts for their citizens and economies. As UNWTO points out the situation is fluid but as the WHO tracker data, as at 17 September, on the right shows that Covid-19 continues to thrive.
  3. Cruiselines
    P&O
    has cancelled all sailings until early 2021. All Caribbean cruises are cancelled until the end of January 2021 and all cruises from and to Southampton are cancelled through February. CLIA cruise lines have committed to reducing the rate of carbon emissions by 40 per cent by 2030 compared to 2008 with increasing reliance on liquified natural gas, Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems (EGCS) and Advanced Wastewater Treatment Systems. more   MSC Cruises launched its first liquefied natural gas (LNG)-powered ship, MSC World Europa.
    A Global Cruise Activist Network has been launched, a worldwide group of activists who are demanding the cruise industry doesn’t return to business-as-usual as cruise ships start sailing again after the COVID-19 pandemic.
    " Inspired by the 2002 Cape Town Declaration on Responsible Tourism, the Future of Tourism Coalition’s Guiding Principles, and the principles and protocols of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent, cruise port communities and their allies have come together to urge worldwide commitment to and implementation and monitoring of the Principles of Responsible Cruise Tourism listed below. The Global Cruise Activist Network calls on cruise companies to delay their return to operations until they address these principles by publishing detailed plans with explicit commitments, benchmarks, and timelines that commit each company to implement specific levels of performance and compliance over time. We want an equitable and responsible system of leisure travel that optimizes economic benefits to all stakeholders while eliminating the negative social, public health, and environmental impacts of cruising on port communities, workers, and passengers. We oppose the return of a “business-as-usual” cruise ship industry. Until these common-sense policies are collectively adopted, effectively implemented, and consistently monitored, the cruise industry will remain complicit in putting passengers, crew, communities, and the planet at risk. "
    more
  4. Cleaner Fuels
    The low-cost carrier Norwegian has committed to reducing carbon emissions by 45% per passenger kilometre (RPK) by 2030 - compared to 2010 levels. This will be achieved through both fleet renewal and sustainable aviation fuels. They have also committed to remove all non-recyclable plastics and recycle all single-use plastics, among other measures. more The Scottish government is spearheading an initiative to accelerate innovation and promote knowledge-sharing about hydrogen fuels. An investment of £300,000 is being made by the Scottish government for a new hydrogen accelerator that will be located in the University of St. Andrews. By combining the skills and expertise of residents at the university with interested parties from across Scotland, authorities aim to greatly speed up the region’s transition to ultra-clean mobility. more

  5. Tackling Climate Change Gathers Pace
    There are still climate change deniers and we need to continue to share the evidence in the hope that they can be helped to understand the scale of the challenge we face. One of the drivers of denial is fear, fear can be paralysing. On October 10th TED is launching COUNTDOWN   Offering online  More than 50 speakers in five curated sessions that combine TED's signature blend of actionable and research-backed ideas, cutting-edge science, and moments of wonder and inspiration.
  6. Human Rights
    The Roundtable Human Rights in Tourism has its full-day Annual Meeting on 28th September on zoom. The event offers keynotes, inputs and a panel discussion in the morning, and interactive thematic workshop sessions for practical exchange in smaller groups in the afternoon. Full details are here.

  7. Biodiversity
    As David Attenborough explained in his latest documentary Extinction: The Facts, shown on primetime television in the UK a few days ago, we face catastrophe if we do not address the twin perils of climate change and biodiversity. These twin perils exacerbate poverty, racism and migration pressures. Attenborough interviewed scientists linking the current Covid-19 pandemic with our over-exploitation of the natural world and the destruction of biodiversity which can nurture or destroy us. Remember Sars, Mers, Ebola, Aids and now Covid-19, it is very unlikely to be the last or the most deadly. more
    The WWF's Living Planet Report 2020 reveals 68% drop in wildlife populations tracked over 46 years (1970-2016). It reports that this catastrophic decline is largely due to the environmental destruction (such as deforestation, unsustainable agriculture and the illegal wildlife trade) that contributes to virus outbreaks such as COVID-19.
    A wealth of video interviews with policymakers and scientists is available on the WTM RT Hub  ‘Biodiversity, eco-system services and tourism – conflict or symbiosis?’ 
  8. Covid-19 and Transforming Tourism
    The Office of the United Nations Secretary-General, António Guterres has published a policy brief  on “COVID-19 and Transforming Tourism”
    The S-G writes: This crisis is also an unprecedented opportunity to transform the relationship of tourism with nature, climate and the economy. It is time to rethink how the sector impacts our natural resources and ecosystems, building on existing work on sustainable tourism; to examine how it interacts with our societies and other economic sectors; to measure and manage it better; to ensure a fair distribution of its benefits and to advance the transition towards a carbon-neutral and resilient tourism economy. A collective and coordinated response by all stakeholders can stimulate the transformation of tourism, together with economic recovery packages, and investments in the green economy.

  9. The Economic Impact of the Pandemic
    As the normal peak season come to the end in European destinations reports of the economic impact of the pandemic on tourism are emerging. 6o% of Italians are reported to have taken a break but Giorgio Palmucci, president of the Italian national tourist board, ENIT, reports that "The projected 2020 loss from overseas visitors to Italy is €24.6 billion and even domestic traveller spending is down €43.6 billion," The Italian Confederation of Business has reported that 70% of hotels in cities like Rome and Florence and 20% in coastal areas never even reopened after the lockdown. The Italian National Institute of Statistics projects that 60% of businesses in the industry fear imminent collapse. More CNN Travel
  10. Miscellany
    Summer with Greta - BBC Radio 4 
    Uthando in South Africa has raised 2,000,000 Rand (~124,00 USD, £95,000)) supporting 40 projects impacted by Covid-19
    Top 8 most powerful passports in the world
    UK launches  Escape the Everyday campaign to boost domestic breaks  more

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

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Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

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Responsible Cape Town
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Better Tourism Africa
Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

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WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

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Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism September 2020 (1)

  1. Learning to Live with Covid-19
  2. Tourism and Racism
  3. Climate Change is still THE Existential Issue
  4. Biodiversity, Habitat & Wildlife 
  5. Sustainable Aviation
  6. The New Air Safety Agenda
  7. Rebuild Tourism - better?
  8. How ethical is a staycation?
  9. The Housing Crisis 
  10. Miscellany 

The next edition will be out in mid-September
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

1. Learning to Live with Covid-19
As Simon Press, Senior Director at WTM London has pointed out: "Companies are now in survival mode and shifting priorities to protecting revenue, reducing costs and maintaining existing customers. Transparency and Trust are key... The crisis is devastating, but the forced pause of the industry does provide an important chance to rethink tourism, and hopefully rebuild in a better way."

Iberostar is offering free medical insurance on every direct booking.   The "Dominican Republic Eliminates Mandatory COVID-19 Tests, Adds Free Insurance As Part of New Tourism Recovery Plan" more

At the virtual WTM, London in November we shall be addressing the core challenge that confronts our sector: How do we build back better after the damage done to our sector by Covid-19. Trust is the new currency of tourism.  Travellers and holidaymakers are understandably nervous about the threat of Coviod-19 to their health and the risk of being trapped abroad or required to quarantine on return. There will be a post-Covid new normal, today's industry leaders will shape it, but in a much more difficult environment. In the July 18 edition of RT News we reported the European poll evidence from MORI ib people's willingness to travel and the attitudes of residents in Europe to international arrivals. The survey revealed the unwillingness of people to travel abroad and to allow in foreign tourists.  The YouGov researchers concluded that "the vast majority of people who might normally consider going somewhere on holiday are refusing to do so specifically because of coronavirus.." Take a look at the detailed data on the YouGov website

2. Tourism and Racism

The Black Lives Matter movement has been a powerful reminder of the ways in which institutional and structural racism shape the way we think and affect what we see. There will be a panel focused on Tourism and Racism as part of the virtual Responsible Tourism programme at WTM, London in November. There is a very much reduced virtual Responsible Tourism programme this year so we are keen to enable voices to be heard in the run-up to the November panel and to continue afterwards. There is already a series of interviews here on YouTube.

The Black Travel Alliance was formed to "hold destinations and travel brands accountable on the issue of diversity in travel marketing and storytelling." Their training and business support is built on three pillars: Alliance. Amplification. Accountability. The Alliance strives to "create a world where Black people are supported and accurately represented in the travel industry."  Racism is an issue that touches every aspect of our industry from employment, through guiding and itineraries to marketing.

Alex Temblador talks about Allyship, why it matters, how to do it and about making travel better.  Allyship matters because once we acknowledge that we have privileges, we need to ensure that we use these privileges to improve the lives of others.   Alex wrote a very perceptive article for Conde Nast Traveller back in August about the questions any anti-racist traveller should ask themselves. The questions a traveller should ask apply too to itinerary planning and destination marketing. Alex also explains clearly the difference between cultural appropriation and appreciation. Once you can see the difference you realise how large the chasm is between them, between the good and the bad.  There is a recorded webinar on opportunities to promote African destinations to the international diaspora and Pan-African, it was part of Africa Travel Week.

3. Climate Change is still THE Existential Issue
Planet Earth has lost 28 trillion tonnes of ice in less than 30 years meaning that sea level rises, triggered by melting glaciers and ice sheets, could reach a metre by the end of the century. Every centimetre of sea-level rise means about a million people will be displaced from their low-lying homelands. The end of the century is one live time away, more victims of climate change are born every day. A forty-year study has revealed that the Arctic Ocean is warming by a degree every decade, the highest rise since the last Ice Age. Over the Barents Sea and around Norway's Svalbard archipelago temperatures have increased by 1.5 degrees per decade throughout the period. Arctic temperatures are rising faster than expected.

Our planet is burning. Carbon emissions from this year's wildfires burning in the Arctic Circle have already outstripped 2019's record levels and are the highest for the region in data going back to 2003. They are up one third on emissions in 2019. more

The Amazon is burning once again and reports say this year could be more devastating than 2019. But there is some good news at last! NASA-funded researchers have developed a new tool which now makes it easier for authorities and other stakeholders to track the types of fires that are burning, the locations they are burning in, and the risks they pose.  Douglas Morton, chief of the Biospheric Sciences Laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, reports that there is " little evidence that the burning moratorium has had an impact. Instead, there is a noticeable increase in fire activity since the moratorium went into effect on July 15, ... ”large numbers of the fires in those states are clearly deforestation—not small-scale agricultural fires.” More

The climate change threat is not diminishing, it is accelerating. It is having real impacts now and we cannot self-isolate to escape its consequences. It is one thing to be worried about an issue and quite something else to do anything about it. It is quite disturbing to hear that only 64% of consumers globally are concerned about climate change. Just this month we have evidence that temperatures in the Arctic Ocean between Canada, Russia and Europe are warming faster than predicted. 28 trillion tonnes of ice have disappeared from the surface of the Earth since 1994, and sea-level rise could be a metre by the time a baby born this year reaches 80. Carbon emissions from this year’s wildfires burning in the Arctic Circle have already outstripped 2019’s record levels, and the Amazon is on fire again. Climate change is a much more significant threat than COVID-19 and much more challenging to deal with. The industry has been slow to respond and to take responsibility to address climate change "Individual businesses and airlines see little, if any, first-mover advantage in reducing their emissions. To do so costs money and risks their being beaten on price by those who refuse to act without compulsion." more

4 Biodiversity, Habitat & Wildlife
One of the consequences of climate change, change to which the travel industry contributes, is habitat and biodiversity loss.  Global warming is an existential threat to us, and to thousands of other species. WTM has partnered with the World Tourism Forum Lucerne (WTFL) to explore how tourism can reduce its negative impacts on biodiversity and have a positive impact – economic, social and ecological.

Founded in Zimbabwe by former Australian special forces soldier and anti-poaching leader Damien Mander, the women-only team of rangers, drawn from the abused and marginalised, is revolutionising the way animals are protected, communities are empowered— and its members’ own lives are being transformed. Mander’s innovative approach to conservation calls for community buy-in rather than full-on armed assault against poachers. If a community understands the economic benefits of preserving animals, then it will eliminate poaching without an armed struggle. AKASHINGA: THE BRAVE ONES is a celebration of the courage, conservation and unorthodox thinking that’s leading to massive positive change. Watch the film here. 

Kenya's Sustainable Travel Tourism Agenda STTA has asked the rhetorical question: Where should the buck stop when clients misbehave when on safari or on any holiday? They conclude that the buck stops with the tour company. Ultimately, a truly responsible tourism company has the opportunity to influence the behavior of its clients and supply chain because the organization's identity and values will be evident at every point of interaction. Read their reasons here. 

There will be a panel, with WTFL, on Biodiversity, eco-system services and tourism - conflict or symbiosis? at the virtual WTM in November.

5
Sustainable Aviation
Many readers of RT News will remember Jane Ashton when she was at TUI, she moved on to EasyJet where she is sustainability director. Recognising the increasing debate about climate change and the need for urgent action Ashton has pointed ou that "all companies will need a clear vision and plan to address" it, and that the aviation industry must “reinvent itself and…move to electric and hybrid aircraft powered by renewable energy.” She argues further that “airlines and destinations should work together to make more sustainable choices.”  “Airlines, destinations and tourism bodies can also together help to ensure that governments have the right policies in place which support investment in new technology and incentivise more sustainable behaviour,” more

The Boeing 747, the much loved Jumbo jet 747 is beginning to be withdrawn from service although. It first flew before the 1969 Moon landing and they have carried the Space Shuttle on their backs. Aircraft are long term investments and the carbon polluting aircraft being built now will still be flying long after 2050, unless ss they are scrapped by government edict.  BA is to retire its fleet of 31 Boeing 747s with immediate effect. more Ryan Air has cut its capacity by a fifth as bookings weaken and announced that it will shut its bases at London Stansted, Southend and Newcastle. more

There will be a panel on decarbonising aviation in the Responsible Tourism virtual programme at WTM, London in November 

6 The New Air Safety Agenda
Seven people from three different parties on Tui flight 6215 from Zante to Cardiff on Tuesday 25th August tested positive for Covid-19. Stephanie Whitfield, from Cardiff, who was on the flight with her partner, told the BBC: "This flight was a debacle. The chap next to me had his mask around his neck. Not only did the airline not pull him up on it, they gave him a free drink when he said he knew a member of the crew. "Loads of people were taking their masks off and wandering up and down the aisles to talk to others. "As soon as the flight landed, a load of people took their masks off immediately. The flight was full of selfish 'covidiots' and an inept crew who couldn't care less." more

In early July nearly two-thirds of the public (64%) said that they would not feel safe travelling by plane, up from 40% on 8 June. more The aviation sector from check-in to the taxi rank in the destination is challenged to ensure client safety, it is no longer just about safety in the air although that remains a big part of it. The pandemic has created a new reason to fear flying. Trust has become the new currency of tourism.

In the UK the Daily Telegraph is backing a campaign by the travel and tourism industry to put in place a Test, Track and Isolate system.  Collaborative testing between states could create a protective corridor to permit international travel, just as security screening does. The LAMP test costs €38, completed the day before or on the day of departure covers the passenger for 72 hours through a digitally secure iWarrant. This is a ‘lab in a box’ solution using Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) technology, and it is I fully CE/IVD certified for use in human diagnostics. more

National Geographic had an article back in January about how virus's spread on planes. The research reported there suggests that window seats are safest. The peer-reviewed research paper produced by The FlyHealthy Research Team on Behaviors, movements, and transmission of droplet-mediated respiratory diseases during transcontinental airline flights published in 2018 is available online.

Eurowings has launched a bookable middle seat from €18

7. Rebuild Tourism - better?

Anastasia Miari writing for The National in the Middle East has asked Will the pandemic turn us into more conscious travellers?   As she argues one demand changes so will supply, but the industry can also make change by developing new products, offering new experiences to attract travellers and holidaymakers. It is too early to tell to what extent people's preferences will have been impacted by the pandemic. But for sure it will vary within source markets and between then.

The World Bank points out that this pandemic is far greater than the SARS outbreak in the early 2000s. There are now twice as many international arrivals – and domestic tourism has grown too. Second, “the emergence of social media as a means of sharing information is compounding uncertainty and has led to heightened anxiety in relation to travel.” And third, for the first time in history, the number of people over the age of 64 is higher than the number of children under the age of five. The authors of the World Bank report foresee:

  • Tourism recovery will be uneven.
  • Demand for particular tourism products/segments may be reshaped leading to new forms.
  • Consolidation of major operators in varied segments is likely, starting with airlines and hotels.
  • More liquid and agile players who can withstand the severity of the downturn could have a significant impact on how countries emerge.
  • Governments will be conflicted. (As businesses struggle to recover governments will be looking to tax them)
  • Many businesses that were directly or indirectly connected to tourism will need assistance to survive.
  • As the effects of the pandemic continue, it will be increasingly difficult to support all firms.
  • Governments will need to be aware of the trade-offs they face in determining policy responses.

As the authors point out “while the timing of reopening borders will have a large impact on the survival of the sector, it can also damage destination credibility if done too early and infections increase.” There is perhaps nothing very surprising here – but it is sobering to see the challenges listed out. The report goes on to give much detailed practical advice to World Bank clients – it is valuable for governments and destinations.
There will be panels on Resilience and Recovery &  Building Back Better in the Responsible Tourism virtual programme at WTM, London in November 

8. How ethical is a staycation?
Flora Samuel, a professor of architecture at the University of Reading and an expert on social value has reflected on the ethics of second homes in the journal Building Design. She recounts how during an Airbnb holiday in Wales she learnt from the neighbours about how "anti-social alterations had been cynically done to the house without planning permission in full knowledge that the local authority would be pretty toothless to remedy them. Its “superhosts”, portrayed as a cosy local couple on the website, was actually a property developer residing in another country."  As she argues these property companies do "offer local employment it is of the most menial type, seasonal and vulnerable when it comes to the pandemic (my friend will be made redundant after furlough). Perhaps going to a UK holiday home isn’t the responsible tourism it might at first appear to be." She concludes "we have to put the heart back into communities and look closely at the social value of our holiday destinations."

9. The Housing Crisis
The Telegraph reports that the collapse of the short term letting market fueled by tourists is leading in London "to a glut of new long-term rental properties which is dramatically driving down prices. Hamptons International, an estate agent, reports that since May, 12% of homes coming onto the rental market in central London were previously short-term lets driving up availability on central London by 42% and causing rental prices to decline by 8.4%. In Northumberland the council is planning to help sustain the vitality of communities, in parishes where 20% or more of household spaces are identified in the latest Census as having no usual residents, a principal residency restriction will be applied to all new market dwellings, which will be secured through a section 106 agreement.”  This would effectively ban sales to buyers who cannot prove they live in an area for a majority of the year. St Ives in Cornwall and Fowey in Cornwall, as well as councils in Suffolk, Norfolk, Cumbria and Derbyshire, are all considering bans on the sale of houses as holiday homes. Barcelona has told landlords of empty flats to find tenants or the city will rent out the property as affordable housing.

10. Miscellany

  • Romanian tourists are overvisiting the remote village of Viscri in central Romania. 
    Sniffer dogs to check air passengers in Finland for COVID-19, experiment to be privately funded more
  • Local residents in the Maldives have won a campaign against developers and the government who wanted to turn Madivaru &  Madivaru Finolhu into a luxury resort. They argued the plan would have deprived local people of vital jobs and caused damage to coral reefs and the wider ecosystem. video
  • Visual Capitalist has produced a graphic showing the cities which in 2018  attracted the most international visitors who stayed for longer than 24 hrs. Hong Kong is still the most popular, although international tourist arrivals declined 4.2%, Bangkok is second, with an increase of 15.1%. London is third despite a decline of 1.4%

Upcoming Responsible Tourism Conferences, Events and Summer Schools

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The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News

RT News Video Channel

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Better Tourism Africa
Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 08/17 2020

  1. Covid-19 the New Normal
  2. Destinations Rethinking Tourism 
  3. More conscious travellers 
  4. Trust and Confidence 
  5. Travel Roulette
  6. Easing of Restrictions in South Africa 
  7. Anti-lockdown Protests
  8. The Pope speaks out for Responsible Tourism  
  9. The future of cruise tourism
  10. Miscellany 

The next edition will be out at the beginning of September
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

1. Covid-19 the New Normal

Scientists are warning that we have created "a perfect storm" for diseases from wildlife to spill over into humans and spread quickly around the world. "In the last 20 years, we've had six significant threats - SARS, MERS, Ebola, avian influenza and swine flu," Prof Matthew Baylis from the University of Liverpool told BBC News. "We dodged five bullets but the sixth got us."And this is not the last pandemic we are going to face, so we need to be looking more closely at wildlife disease." Many scientists agree that our behaviour - particularly deforestation and our encroachment on diverse wildlife habitats - is helping diseases to spread from animals into humans more frequently. According to Prof Kate Jones from University College London, evidence "broadly suggests that human-transformed ecosystems with lower biodiversity, such as agricultural or plantation landscapes, are often associated with increased human risk of many infections".

Between 2011 and 2018, WHO tracked 1483 epidemic events in 172 countries.  Epidemic-prone diseases such as influenza, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), Ebola, Zika, plague, Yellow Fever and others, are harbingers of a new era of high-impact, potentially fast-spreading outbreaks that are more frequently detected and increasingly difficult to manage. Fig. 1 demonstrates the global emergence of selected pathogens over the past 50 years, including both those that naturally emerge/re-emerge and those that are deliberately released. The report is available to download.

 

Euromonitor International has used its Travel Forecast Model to forecast the sector's 2020 experience, cruising is forecast to drop 58%, airlines by 46.9%, traditional package holidays by 46.6%,   hotels by 44.1% and campsites by 32.7%. With staycations removing most of the risk of quarantine.  76% of consumers expected to holiday closer to home in the short to mid-term, global domestic tourism is forecast to a marginally less severe decline of -33.0% in 2020, from 12.9 billion trips taken in 2019 to 8.6 billion in 2020. Euromonitor concludes that: "The travel industry is broken with COVID-19 shining a light on the fragile cracks in the system, with 80% of companies surveyed witnessing a drop in bookings between 60% to 100%."

The burgeoning middle class in the developing world has driven a great deal of the growth in domestic and international tourism. Governments in rich countries are helping the middle classes ride out the crisis, "few low- and middle-income countries can afford to emulate them." The travel and tourism sector will be badly impacted by a fall in disposable incomes.

2. Destinations Rethinking Tourism
The growing acceptance of the importance of Responsible Tourism has been accelerated and deepened by the experience of Covid-19. Destinations have had a holiday from tourism. Overtourism crept up on destinations and it was accepted. Covid-19 reminded residents of what their place was like before tourism and raised awareness of both negative and positive impacts. While most destinations are in the survival phase some are already looking to build back better and to use tourism rather than to be used by it. more

The Guardian has a long article reporting on "How coronavirus is reshaping Europe's tourism hotspots". There is discussion of Barcelona, Prague and Venice with excellent photographs revealing public spaces before Coivid-19 and during it.

 

After negative comments about ‘diseased’ visitors, parking, litter and ‘selfish’ beach-goers, Jones, chief executive of North Wales Tourism, warned o that negative comments about second-home owners and tourists hold the Welsh economy back. He added that those who choose Wales as a second home make up a significant part of Welsh communities too. Theo Davies-Lewis is a Welsh communications strategist and political commentator argues that local authorities need "to police current coronavirus restrictions more stringently and effectively. After all, visitors to beauty spots such as the Gower would have been as shocked as I was this weekend by the sheer absence of authority to enforce distancing rules that were broken repeatedly." He called for "an urgent meeting with the devolved administrations to agree how best to manage responsible tourism during a global pandemic." And asserted that "Our communities should not be treated solely as holiday homes: more importantly, they are the cradles of a historical language and breath-taking nature. Both should be respected by visitors, no matter where they are from..." more

In the Scottish Highlands MSP John Finnie has called for action to understand the impact of tourism following a spate of incidents of irresponsible behaviour by some visitors. "Whether it’s the disrespect for the Commando Memorial, the cutting down of trees for campfires or the reckless disposal of human waste, some visitors have made communities across the Highland and Islands anxious and, in many cases, angry." He argues that "these issues require to be robustly dealt with by local authorities and the police now and a clear signal given about what responsible tourism means." Lord Thurso, chair of VisitScotland, has expressed confidence that there will be a "rebalancing" of tourism following the surge in post-lockdown visitors that has led to a catalogue of complaints in the Highlands and other parts of the country. "Put it this way: I think I’d rather deal with the problems of success than the problems of having no tourists.” He points out that "Many young people live in small, cramped flats and they’re desperate to get some fresh air and freedom. Normally they would probably be going on a package holiday to Spain or somewhere like that, all of which they can’t do. So you have a large number of people who have been cooped up, who are desperate to get out and about, whose normal holiday places are unavailable, and naturally they head for the hills and the coasts.... this is a particular circumstance and hopefully in future years we will see a return to more normal tourism." “At the moment Glasgow and Edinburgh hotel occupancy is sitting at under 20 per cent. Holiday homes outside the cities are sitting at 90 per cent occupancy. Normally Edinburgh would be 100 per cent occupied."

National Parks, conservation, wildlife and nature have become increasingly dependent on revenues from tourism. At WTM, London in November there will be a panel on tourism and biodiversity with senior leaders form conservation and the industry. The residents, human, plants and animals on the tiny island of Lundy off the Devon coast are at risk because of the Covid-19 pandemic. Lundy was the UK’s first-ever marine conservation zone and is a special area of conservation and a site of special scientific interest. From a low of just 13 individuals at the turn of the century, there are now more than 400 puffins on Lundy and numbers of Manx shearwaters rose from 297 breeding pairs in 2001 to more than 5,000 by 2018. Lundy has been closed for three months, it is now open but social distancing rules have cut its daytripper capacity from 250 to 90. The island needs to raise £300,000 to make it through to next spring. more

Cities like York in the UK  with around 30,000 people working in the badly hit retail, hospitality and tourism sector – about one in four of all jobs – of whom about half are on part-time or zero-hours contracts are likely to be hit hard by the pandemic. Analysis by the York and North Yorkshire Local Enterprise Partnership, based on research by the Treasury’s independent forecaster, estimates that as many as 13,835 jobs in York will be lost in the scenario considered most likely, taking the city’s unemployment rate to 14.5% – the highest since modern records began in 1971 and more than double the rate in the economic slowdown of 2011. Sam Leach,  co-founder of Spark:York, a community interest company, launched in 2018, describes York as a “tale of two cities” – one geared towards tourists but prohibitively expensive for locals, particularly the younger generation. more

3. More conscious travellers   

UK research by academics at Cardiff and Manchester universities into lifestyle choices adopted during the lockdown has found that the level of concern about climate change had increased. The research also suggested that the pandemic and lockdown.  The academic survey covered 1,800 respondents in May 2020, over 90% of respondents said that tackling climate change required at least a moderate level of urgency with more than two-thirds saying that climate change needs to be addressed with a high level of urgency. This understanding inevitably affected people's reporting of their willingness to tackle climate change. 40% accepted that they should definitely limit their amount of air travel and over 40% that they should probably limit their flying. Less than 15% reported that they did not really need to do this. It remains to be seen whether this realisation fo the need to fly less will lead to a significant reduction if and when Covid-19 passes.

Some travellers and holidaymakers too will be rethinking the experiences they seek. Anastasia Miari, asked in the UAE's TheNational:  "As tourists begin to tentatively spread their wings once more, the hope is that we will begin to travel with a newly acquired consciousness, which could have far-reaching consequences on both people and the planet."

4. Trust and Confidence
Trust is the new currency of travel but in a fragmented industry with any trip involving multiple businesses and fellow consumers from multiple places delivering a safe environment is very challenging. The pandemic has revealed the contribution which travel for leisure, business and work makes to the spread of viruses and demonstrated the danger of dependency on tourism. Governments around the world have sought to protect their citizens and health services by closing borders and imposing quarantine on those arriving from areas with higher rates of Covid-19 infections. While there is optimism that vaccines will be found to contain the virus and more effective treatments to reduce the impact of further waves of infection will be developed, it is not yet possible to determine the new normal.

With over 280,000 new cases, of Covid-19 being reported daily the pandemic is going to dominate decision making about travel for a long time yet. Travelling is a great deal riskier than it was.

5.  Travel Roulette
In the UK Thousands of UK holidaymakers were given just over 24 hours to get back to British soil from France, those who chose to stay on and finish their holiday and those who could not get transport by air, rail or ferry now have to self-isolate for 14 days. Those expected to return to teach at the beginning of the school term, those with children due to begin school and those unable to work from home have no choice but to curtail their planned holiday. Heathrow Airport accused the government of "quarantine roulette" and called for testing in airports to boost demand and reduce the risk for travellers of having to quarantine on return or arrival. The Netherlands, Monaco, Malta, Turks & Caicos and Aruba were also removed from the travel exemptions list at short notice. more
Covid-19 continues to frustrate holidaymakers and hosts alike

6. Easing of Restrictions in South Africa
Cyril Ramaphosa has announced that from midnight on Monday, the 17th of August South Africa will move to alert level 2. Economic activity will be allowed with the necessary and appropriate stringent health protocols and safety precautions in place. All restrictions on inter-provincial travel will be lifted. International Accommodation, hospitality venues and tours will be permitted according to approved protocols to ensure social distancing. Restaurants, bars and taverns will be permitted to operate according to approved protocols as to times of operation and numbers of people. more This augurs well for the beginning of the recovery but much will depend on the details of the protocols and the continued decline in infection rates.

7. Anti-lockdown Protests
In Germany, there is a growing protest movement against the government's handling of the pandemic and in particular, the curbs on individual freedom imposed to tackle the virus. There is a broad range of opposition from far-right extremists and anti-vaxers to people  "waving peace and rainbow flags, as well those with placards reading "Jesus Lives!"'  Deutsche Welle (DW) reported that "the 6th August event had been organized by a controversial Stuttgart-based organization known to have staged the country's largest anti-coronavirus lockdown protests so far. That day's theme — "Tag der Freiheit," or "Day of Freedom" — was eerily reminiscent of the title of a 1935 Nazi propaganda film by Leni Riefenstahl." moremore

There is an ethical dilemma as a minority reject the views of mainstream politicians, the mainstream media and scientists. A wide range of people feel that their fundamental freedoms are under threat, that ministers are acting beyond their constitutional powers. Politicians are looking at increasing their powers to curb the pandemic.

There have been anti-lockdown protests in Austalia, Germany, New Zealand.  Poland and the UK  and the USA.

8. The Vatican speaks out for Responsible Tourism
The Vatican is calling on governments and economic policymakers to promote and encourage responsible tourism, particularly in rural and remote areas. Sustainable and responsible tourism, when implemented according to the principles of social and economic justice and in full respect of the environment and cultures, he says, recognises the centrality of the local host community and its right to be a protagonist in the sustainable and socially responsible development of its territory. As the world heals itself after the ravages of COVID-19,  tourism can become an instrument of proximity and fraternity among peoples. more

9. The future of cruise tourism
Cruise passengers who contracted coronavirus onboard Costa Cruises, Costa Magica, are suing the company for negligence and misconduct. A group of 207 French passengers on the cruise liner have in a class action accused the Italian company of injuries and manslaughter as well as endangering the lives of others. more  Locals in Venice are planning a party to celebrate the announcement that two cruise lines will not be stopping off in the city for the rest of 2020. Italian lines MSC Crociere and Costa Crociere both confirmed they would drop Venice from their itineraries in favour of Trieste or Genoa when cruising restarts, reports The GuardianSeychelles Tourism Minister Didier Dogley has announced that no cruise ships will sail in our out of Port Victoria until 2022, at the earliest. The move, effective immediately cuts a significant angle of tourism out of the Seychelles tourism economy, but the minister believes there are safer, better ways to recover them.  Ronny Brutus, CEO Seychelles Ports pointed out that “It is to be noted that the cruise industry has been a major catalyst by which the COVID-19 has spread throughout the world”. Ammonia is fast emerging as an alternative to fossil fuels for shipping. The potential for renewable energy to be used to produce “green” rather than “brown” ammonia that has revived interest in it as both a practical and potential low-carbon transport fuel. When burnt correctly ammonia produces power and water and nitrogen as waste. more
Since the No Sail Order was extended on April 15, and extended a second time on July 16, CDC has worked with cruise lines to help thousands of crew members return home safely. Safe disembarkation of crew has included a requirement for cruise lines to submit a signed attestation and use non-commercial transportation for their crew members. more

10. Miscellany
 A new Journal of Responsible Tourism Management (JTRM) will be launched in January 2021, aimed to disseminate knowledge on responsible tourism and hospitality based on contemporary issues in Sarawak and developing destinations locally or internationally. more
Intrepid plans by the end of 2020 to offset more carbon than it emits. However, offsetting is fraught with difficulties.  Carbon Offsetting: Too good to be true?

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Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 08/01 2020

  1. Responsible Tourism at WTM London 
  2. The Pandemic Remains Rampant
  3. Irresponsible Tourism a Growing Problem?
  4. Responsible Tourism During the Pandemic 
  5. Tourism and Racism 
  6. Covid-19, Ethical Issues for Tourism 
  7. Developments in India 
  8. Responsible Tourism Arrives in the USA 
  9. Responsible Tourism Resources 
  10. Miscellany 

This edition is a little later than planned. We aim to publish at the beginning of each month and somewhere around the 15th
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

1. Responsible Tourism at WTM London
WTM London – the event where Ideas Arrive – and Travel Forward – the travel and hospitality technology event co-located with WTM London – are working closely with partners and experts to ensure a safe and successful experience at ExCeL London (2-4 November 2020). On 2nd November the UNWTO and WTM will partner with the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC), which is representing the global travel and tourism private sector at the event for the first time in its history, making it the UNWTO, WTTC & WTM Ministers’ Summit. more
There will be more in RTNews in September about the Responsible Tourism programme this year.  Part of the programme is already clear, as usual, we'll be raising some issue but focusing on solutions.  The World Responsible Tourism Awards will be presented virtually on November 4th. The Responsible Tourism panels, discussions and debates will take place during WTM Virtual 10-11 November.  There will be lively panel debates on decarbonising aviation, tourism and racism, biodiversity and the role of certification.

2. The Pandemic Remains Rampant


India has more than one million coronavirus cases, the third-highest number of cases in the world. it is important to remember that while India makes up 17% of the world's population, it has only 7% of the world's coronavirus cases. By contrast, the US has only 4% of the world's population and 26% of the world's coronavirus cases.
The pandemic has hit tourism to Africa hard. A crisis which is depriving holidaymakers of their holidays is depriving hosts of their livelihoods. Countries have closed their borders to protect the lives of their citizens; inevitably, this has had a devastating impact on the tourism industry. The Gambia has almost no domestic tourism and the airports are closed. In South Africa, leisure travel and the leisure economy is closed. more As the South African industry approached 120 days of lockdown Harold Goodwin interviewed Tshifhiwa Tshivhengwa and Gillian Saunders of the Tourism Business Council of South Africa about the way forward. video
The UK government's decision to abandon quarantine in favour of voluntary “stay at home” guidance. Sir Patrick Vallance, the Government's chief scientific officer, has pointed to evidence that hundreds of different strains of Covid-19 were brought into the UK after the Government abandoned special measures for international arrivals on March 13. Up to 10,000 infected people entered the UK, accelerating the spread of disease. More

Loveholidays has produced some useful guidance for people looking to holiday during the Covid-19 pandemic. Responsible Tourism during Covid-19 

Covid-19 is now the most significant determinant of demandHolidaymakers focus on Holiday quarantine: Which country will be next?

Trust has become the new currency of tourism.

 

There is much uncertainty for tourists and tourism businesses. The UK government's decision to impose a 14-day quarantine on everyone arriving from Spain was "unjust", Spain's prime minister has said.

3. Irresponsible Tourism a Growing Problem?
Traffic gridlock, litter and 'mayhem' – a dispatch from the Devon resort of Salcombe., in the UK "I've noticed increasingly frequent reports of troublesome behaviour; illegal drinking in public spaces, littering in the parks, even a smashed windscreen." "I'm on holiday – I don't need to social distance," said one visitor.
Around Loch Morlich, in Scotland, there was a spate of campfires lit by "dirty campers", some of which required the fire service to extinguish them as people breached the Scottish Outdoor Access Code. Their behaviour described in the local press as "irresponsible and downright dangerous".
The Mayor of Capri has ordered that face masks must be worn outdoors in the evening. He is reported to have said: "‘We don’t want infected people on the island when the tourist season is reaching its peak…” more
In Wales 500 cars parked on mountain roads in Snowdonia, with people camping in laybys to hike up Snowdon. In Barmouth visitors blocked a potential rescue by parking on the lifeboat forecourt. "We are lucky we have the scenery, I know lockdown has been hard for people living in cities, but people are not respecting the environment or other people," Ms Jefferies said. "It was just so haphazard, fancy stopping on a mountain on a bend, and not thinking about the consequences, and just going for a walk, it's so selfish."
Tourists returning home are a problem too. The head of Germany's Robert Koch Institute for health, Lothar Wieler, said that young Germans going on holiday and ignoring coronavirus rules are an increasing cause of concern. Footage of revellers in Spain's Mallorca and a Bulgarian resort town have been splashed across German media. "It is reckless and careless to take part in wild parties," said Wieler, calling the partygoers "irresponsible".

4 Responsible Tourism During the Pandemic
Nominations for the 2020 World Responsible Tourism Awards closed on 3rd August with over 200 entries. The judges will now get to work, and the commended and highly commended will be announced at WTM London in November. There are many examples of tourism players taking responsibility and stepping up to tackle the pandemic.  There are many examples of businesses in destinations which are fundraising to support local people and wildlife. There are just a few here.
In Barcelona, a new tour Barcelona Panoramica has been launched to enable Barcelonians to hop on a double-decker bus and experience their city as if they were tourists coming from afar. The special tours w are designed by the transport authority of the Catalonian capital (TMB) to revive spirits after the lockdown, will be offered until 30 August.
In Lisbon, the Mayor is displacing Airbnb, by prioritising affordable housing for hospital staff, transport workers, teachers and thousands of others who provide essential services. Lisbon is offering to pay landlords to turn thousands of short-term lets into “safe rent” homes for key workers. Fernando Medina Mayor of Lisbon writes "It’s a bold strategy that offers landlords long-term, stable incomes and gives us the chance to recreate a more vibrant, healthier and equitable city."

5. Tourism and Racism
With renewed awareness of racism in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests and the rediscovery of the impact of slavery around the world we are recording a series of interviews about racism in travel and tourism today. In the modern world, slavery thrives and in the UK too. The UK’s HM Treasury announced in February 2018 that only in 2015  was the loan taken out to compensate slave owners at abolition was finally repaid. HM Treasury suggested that we should be proud of the fact that we helped end slavery by compensating the slave owners. I am not. Freed slaves did not receive any compensation.
The will be a live panel discussion during the virtual WTM, London Responsible Tourism programme on 10 & 11 November. Between now and then we are developing a playlist of videos on travel, tourism and racism. Four are online, take a look. If you would like to be interviewed, know someone we should talk with use the contact form to contact us.

6. Covid-19, Ethical Issues for Tourism
There have been many medical, economic and social ethical issues raised by Covid-19. Tourism has raised some ethical issues too.  Tourism “in Kenya has been made an expensive luxury product. Tourists cannot be hoi polloi. Tourism is for those Europeans and Americans and Asians who have nothing better to do in their countries so they pay to come to Kenya to stare at wild animals and take photos….  tourism in Kenya has been made an expensive luxury product. Tourists cannot be hoi polloi. Tourism is for those Europeans and Americans and Asians who have nothing better to do in their countries, so they pay to come to Kenya to stare at wild animals and take photos.” “  business folk, the tourism stakeholders and successive governments have made Kenyans believe that tourism or tourist products are not for them by charging rates way too high for a people still struggling with basic needs.” More in the Kenyan paper The Standard.
Pam Mandel, asks in Skift "Americans Can Travel — But Should They? "The Houston Chronicle recently ran a story about swank local road trips. That same week the paper ran a story about how Houston’s emergency rooms were at capacity thanks to Covid. The whole thing made my head spin. While Americans go about summer vacation as usual, our infection rates continue to rise, even though we know staying home lowers transmission of the disease and decreases the load on health services."
Meanwhile Not Fit-For-Purpose reflects on a decade of research and analysis into international standard-setting MSIs. It concludes that this grand experiment has failed in its goal of providing effective protection against abuse. While MSIs can play important roles in building trust and generating dialogue, they are not fit-for-purpose to reliably detect abuses, hold corporations to account for harm, or provide access to remedy. It is time to think again about certification.  Certification: what comes next?

7. Developments in India
Mizoram
in northeastern India shares borders with three of the seven sister states and the neighbouring countries of Bangladesh and Myanmar. Mizoram is developing a new Responsible Tourism Plan. In Uttarakhand the Hight Court has asserted the importance of Responsible Tourism and that in developing the tourism sector the environment aspect and social and aesthetic needs of the people have to be taken into account. In Kerala, Kannapuram, a panchayat about 15 kilometres from Kannur town, as Indigenous Mango Heritage Area owing to the presence of over 200 varieties of mango trees in the locality.

8. Responsible Tourism Arrives in the USA
In Hawaii Hawaii County has released its five-year strategic tourism plan, a guiding document to help ensure responsible tourism that respects the Big Island’s communities and natural and cultural resources. It starts from the premise that “successful tourism starts with a high quality of life for residents … and sets it as the vision for the future of Hawaii Island.” more
In Durango Colorado, Visit Durango has just completed its first Resident Sentiment Survey with over 1200 responses. They plan to engage residents and to take a more active role in tourism management and development. They are fostering a more consistent, year-round economy to support local businesses and workers, and exploring ways to attract less price sensitive, more high value travelers.

9. Responsible Tourism Resources
Sarah Habsburg has years of experience in marketing small hotels.  In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, she has developed a series of resources for small, independent hotels, b&bs, lodges & hostels. Three on developing resilience action plans for coping with Covid-19 and three on marketing for the post-Covid-19 tourism world; marketing inspiration, social media and attracting domestic guests.  They are available free online at www.tourismresilience.com
Emilie Hagedoorn s a responsible tourism and market access expert and owner of Green Heart Tourism based in Utrecht in The Netherlands. She has extensive knowledge of the latest responsible tourism developments in Africa and globally. Emily has published on the Good Tourism Institute website tips for finding new business partners and customers once tourism recovers.

10. Miscellany
New Zealand has launched a Tourism Futures Taskforce, a public-private partnership to lead the thinking on the future of tourism in New Zealand.
E-volunteering is for people and places a new way of enabling volunteers to share skills, using video conferencing to build language skills, mentoring, collaboratively producing training material, generating fundraising ideas and providing business and marketing support.
Plastics: The Recommendations for the Tourism Sector to Continue Taking Action on Plastic Pollution During COVID-19 Recovery have been publicly launched. These recommendations were developed jointly by UNEP, UNWTO and Ellen MacArthur Foundation with support from the Advisory Group of the Global Tourism Plastics Initiative and other representatives of the tourism industry.

Upcoming Responsible Tourism Conferences, Events and Summer Schools

#rtdfinland2021 5-6 June  Summer School 3-9 June in Helsinki and Jyväskylä
RT Unite Monthly Meetings


The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
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Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

 

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The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Better Tourism Africa
Responsible Traveller, South Africa
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WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

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Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 07'1/2020

  1. Covid-19 the Good, the Bad and the Ugly 
  2. The Good: the WTM RT Awards in the Year of Covid-19
  3. Covid the New Normal? 
  4. Covid-19: The Bad
  5. Covid-19: The Ugly 
  6. Racism in Travel and Tourism 
  7. Is aviation going to deal with its dirty fuel?
  8. Overtourism
  9. Resilience requires preparedness
  10. Miscellany

There is now so much news that from July Responsible Tourism News will be published fortnightly on or around the 15th and at the end of each month.

Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism 

  1. Covid-19 the Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Covid-19 is a global pandemic but it is unevenly spread around the world, in some countries the worst has passed for now, in other the situation is worsening. As we shall see some tourism has returned with ugly consequences. The Covid-19 pandemic is still growing. CNN reports as we go to press that "The United States recorded more than 67,000 new cases on Tuesday, in the highest one-day jump so far as states see infections surge. Florida alone has more cases than all but eight entire countries. In Africa, The Gambia has no tourists and in South Africa, all leisure travel is prohibited, the country is closed to international visitors and there is a ban on interprovincial travel. Many countries past the peak of the pandemic, at least for now, are reopening. Headout has built a  Global Travel Reopening Dashboard that is monitoring the real-time status of 800 top tourism landmarks around the world, with live updates on re-openings and safety measures for the top 800+ landmarks around the world and an interactive map of 100 countries with corresponding travel regulations, quarantine rules, and case trends help them review and decide their next travel destination. This is a mammoth undertaking and some time lags are to be expected.  The BBC has a useful page on where it is now possible to holiday in the UK. 
    A YouGov poll (29 June to 9 July)  has revealed the unwillingness of people to travel abroad and to allow in foreign tourists. The picture is inevitably complex.  For example, only Italians were broadly supportive of allowing in other Europeans – with the exception of Britons – although they are heavily opposed to allowing in Chinese and American tourists. People in France, Spain, Italy and Germany are all more likely to oppose British tourists coming for this summer than they are tourists from other European countries. People across Europe tend to be most worried by American and Chinese tourists, however. American tourists are the most opposed in all countries surveyed (except Sweden where they come second to Chinese tourists, and Finland where they come second to Swedes). Overall 61-79% of people in each country oppose allowing American tourists spending time in their country this summer. The YouGov researchers concluded that "the vast majority of people who might normally consider going somewhere on holiday are refusing to do so specifically because of coronavirus.." Take a look at the detailed data on the YouGov website

YouGov polled Adults in GB between 2 - 3 July and found that while 45% expect to travel in the UK in the next six months. Nearly two-thirds of the public (64%) would not feel safe travelling by plane currently, up from 40% on 8 June. There is a similar unease about other types of international transport. Over half of Brits (55%) say they’d feel unsafe travelling by train. Only 12% of those over 65 are considering travelling abroad,  75% say they feel uneasy about flying, an increase from 47% on June 8th. more

The ugly relates to the British and Germans in Spain, see item 5.

2. The Good: the WTM Responsible Tourism Awards in the Year of Covid-19
Covid has revealed the importance of tourism. When it stopped the contribution which tourism made, until the crisis, to the livelihoods of local people and the maintenance of wildlife and habitat became all too apparent. Some tourism businesses have taken responsibility and used their assets and their relationships with travellers, agents and suppliers to support communities and conservation. This year the World Responsible Tourism Awards have been refashioned to address the Covid-19 crisis. We are looking to recognise and commend those who have seen the impact of the crisis on communities and wildlife and responded.

The Awards close at midnight on August 3rd, it will take no more than 15 minutes to nominate yourself or another business or destination and you can make multiple nominations. Nominate here.

Rachel McCaffery has established Give Them a Break to set up “holidays for heroes” and thank key workers across the UK for their efforts during the coronavirus pandemic. Park edge communities in the Bwindi Mgahinga Conservation Area in Uganda have been hard hit by Covid-19 and the loss of tourism earnings. They are raising money through social media campaigns, establishing food banks and making masks and soap for their own needs and to sell locally and abroad. more In Cornwall St Ives, Falmouth and Truro roads have been closed to traffic and pedestrianised to facilitate social distancing. North Tyneside Council sent a letter to local residents informing them of proposals to close a number of streets with “a challenging combination of narrow footpaths, small premises and high demand” from July 1 - "in time for the start of the busy summer season". Norfolk County Council has given local authorities permission to implement road restrictions in 13 towns until December. Oxford and Cambridge widened pavement areas, introduced one-way flows and widened cycle lanes and footpaths. more

3. Covid the New Normal?
The World Health Organisation warned this week that there will be no return to the “old normal for the foreseeable future”. Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the WHO, said on 14th July that the pandemic is going to “get worse and worse and worse” unless the basics of infection control are followed. He went on “Let me be blunt, too many countries are headed in the wrong direction,”  “The virus remains public enemy number one, but the actions of many governments and people do not reflect this.” on Sunday 12th the globe hit yet another grim milestone: 230,370 new cases were reported worldwide, a record-breaking increase. The United States, BrazilIndia and South Africa reported the largest rises in cases, according to the WHO’s daily situation report.  80 per cent of new cases were in just 10 countries, and 50 per cent in two. The latest dates from the WHO clearly shows the growth in cases in the Americas and the decline in Europe.
By the 15th Coronavirus cases were surging in Latin America, the continent had officially declared a total of 144,758 deaths, passing the 144,023 recorded in the United States and Canada. It now stands second only to Europe, where 202,505 people have died. more

Travel for leisure, business, work and study spread the pandemic. Areas which have so far had relatively few cases, often remote rural areas with limited health facilities, are understandably concerned about an influx of potentially infectious visitors.  Scottish Highland councillor Niall McLean put the issue bluntly: “This area got off lightly during lockdown, but that makes opening up even more worrying. It was the local communities that kept themselves safe and supported each other, and they don’t want to risk their health, and possibly lives, for economic gain.” more

Travel and tourism bodies in Kerala "have leaned towards domestic and local tourism -- identifying unexplored places in the state, encouraging and generating interest in the same among Malayalis and offering the same experiences at lower rates -- thereby sustaining the distressed sector. Bordeaux has used "tips for responsible tourism" to relaunch the destination: slow tourism, "accommodation that is respectful of the inhabitants of Bordeaux", responsible eateries, local and ethical shops, limiting waste and Enjoy an eco-responsible lifestyle."

The majority of citizens in Germany fear that summer holidays will cause the number of corona infections to rise again. 69 per cent believe that this will lead to a significant increase in the number of infections in Germany, according to the current ZDF "Politbarometer", which was published on 10th July  The Isle of Wight is  launching a Visitor Charter inviting visitors to help the community to contain the virus "by doing everything you can to have a safe and enjoyable visit."

4. Covid-19: The Bad
In Africa, a crisis which is depriving holidaymakers of their holidays is depriving hosts of their livelihoods. The Gambia has closed its borders and its tourism industry to halt the spread of Coronavirus. In South Africa Coronavirus cases have passed 280,000, with 4,172 deaths by 14th July. The government has restricted inter-provincial and international travel in order to contain the virus, but this has had a major impact on the tourism sector which is not expected to come out of lockdown until April 2021 at the earliest. more  South Africans are currently only allowed to fly domestically for business purposes, with international travel only allowed for repatriation and medical evacuations. The tourism, sector has been hard around the world, in Africa, and South Africa in particular, many rural jobs are in tourism supporting extended families otherwise dependent on subsistence farming, the industry and local communities face a crisis if tourism does not reopen soon. The trade-offs between health and livelihoods are complex, difficult and frightening - there are so many losers. These are "impossible choices facing the reopening of economies in southern Africa." more

On July 8th,  Andrew Buerckner, Director at Platinum Travel Corporation / UNIGLOBE Global Solutions has bravely come out and admitted that he is struggling. "Some days, I’m struggling to drag myself out of bed; to find purpose in what I’m doing; to concentrate past midday..... Last week, I sat in on a meeting with some key players in the global travel industry. We never made it to our agenda, though, because one of our colleagues on the call broke down long before we could get there. And I understood exactly how they felt. The trouble is, I’m not sure how many people outside the travel industry really get it. There’s a level of naivety amongst even my closest family and friends about just how bad things really are." Andrew is only openly reporting what a lot of people are feeling. Read more of his concerns here. Wildlife tourism makes a very significant contribution to the cost of conserving habitat and wildlife. As Johan Robinson, Chief of the Global Environment Facility Biodiversity and Land Degradation Unit at UN Environment has pointed out the benefits of biodiversity and natural areas are universal, the costs of protection are high and disproportionately borne by the poor communities living with wildlife. The absence of tourists and tourism revenues increases the vulnerability of wildlife to poachers.  more

5. Covid-19: The Ugly
This is The Sun newspaper's headline on the YouGov survey results on 9th July. "BRITS may not be welcome in Europe after all as a new survey finds them at the bottom of the list for tourists countries are happy to welcome. People in France, Spain, Italy and Germany have all expressed concerns about UK tourists due to the alarming coronavirus rate in the country."
As Magaluf reopened drunk British holidaymakers were not wearing masks and jumping on cars'

One angry local raged on social media: “Total chaos in Punta Bellena. Hundreds of sons of b***ches from Great Britain. No face masks on, jumping on top of cars, drunk, drinking alcohol in the street. A disaster. Where’s the police? A f**king disgrace.” The anti ‘trash tourism’ decree approved in January was intended to restrict the promotion and sale of alcohol in specific areas of the Balearic Islands including Magaluf and San Antonio on neighbouring Ibiza.  The legislation requiring bars to close at 02:00 appears to have fuelled the ugly behaviour. more
Only a few days earlier  Iago Negueruela, the Balearic minister for the economy, labour and tourism. has said that "There won't be that kind of mass tourism because those places are not going to open; it's a clear message." We have "already started a process and it is irreversible. The pubs won't open this year. We are no longer going to receive or tolerate that kind of tourist, who can be a risk for themselves and others." The law against "tourism of excesses" that was introduced at the start of the year, banning pub crawls and happy hours. He was optimistically asserting that the "... hotel sector has already staked out its preference for quality and not just numbers, but the perception does not always accompany the reality. Even in Magaluf, a transformation has been taking place, with a focus on five-star hotels, its beaches and gastronomy." "Some elements of this crisis might be temporary, like face masks," says Andreu Serra, tourism chief for the Mallorca Council island administration. "But this is also an opportunity to improve our care of tourists, by using technology to control numbers so we know when beaches will be full, and generally boosting hygiene in all hospitality areas."  The local council has responded by closing the strip in Magaluf for two months. more

6. Racism in Travel and Tourism
"It is not about marketing slogans or campaigns in my view, but about the proactive actions each of us personally take and hold ourselves accountable for," Carnival chief executive Arnold Donald, one of the few black executives in the industry, wrote in an email. "There is an opportunity here for all of us to do more - and do much better - looking closely at our diversity and inclusion results across the board and challenging ourselves as individuals to take actions that can make a difference." more
Auliana Poon, writing from the Caribbean, has powerfully contrasted their experience with that of Blacks in America. As Auliana points out "For people who have been born in the Caribbean, it is truly a privilege. To live in a free and democratic society, where education and health are free; where the environment is pristine; and the air is fresh. But we are not yet in the clear. Because we are unable to create enough jobs; our major export is people (the brain drain); islanders do not worship the ground we were born on, dreaming about America instead; we do not eat what grows in our backyard or in the sea (preferring Kentucky Fry Chicken instead and allowing the Chinese and Japanese to rape our waters and sea beds); and we do not love who we are, wishing we were whiter."  Read more here.Jacqueline Ngo Mpii founded Little Africa in 2014, a tour company, publishing house and cultural agency based in Paris.. She offers walking tours in la Goutte d’Or, also known as ‘Little Africa’, a working-class neighbourhood that has been branded a ‘no-go zone’ by some cultural commentators. This densely populated, lively pocket of the north of Paris lies to the east of the Montmartre hill, but while (in non-pandemic times) tourists arrive by the bus-load to visit the neighbouring Sacré-Coeur, the vast majority never set foot there. more
Forbes Magazine carried an inspiring story about Beks Ndlovu, a Zimbabwean who founded African Bush Camps  in 2006,  a  'black leader, in a white-dominated industry.' As he says "Our industry needs to reshape itself for an inevitable future which can only serve us better. We need to be able to attract people of colour into more senior positions to give us the diversity we need to form perspectives and make decisions as a collective culture. I would like to see more industry initiatives and funds that support and groom new African leaders and ambassadors of conservation for the future. The transformation should not just be with our staff but our target market – from locals to foreign black travellers – they should be encouraged to travel and experience our amazing continent." more

7. Is aviation going to deal with its dirty fuel?~
This looked like good news "robust climate action", safeguarding CORSIA. When you read the press release you quickly understand that the 'safeguarding' is to save the scheme not to save our planet.  On June 30th the Council of ICAO to change the baseline which was to be based on the average of 2019 & 2020 emissions. It will now be based on 2019. As Chris Lyle of Canadian-based Air Transport Economics and a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society has pointed out "Aviation bailouts during Covid-19 have been made as a matter of urgency, with few being conditioned. Some payouts have been subject to consumer protection provisions but only a very few to climate targets, even if then on the basis of cash now for commitment in a different time scale, such as carbon net-zero by 2050."

8. Overtourism
The contrast between tourism pre-Covid-19 and during the lockdown is stark. The feature writers are writing about the challenge of managing overtourism, the issue has not gone away. Recently in The Guardian Christopher de Bellaigue, a journalist and author who has covered the Middle East and South Asia since 1994, wrote a long read: "The pandemic has devastated global tourism, and many will say ‘good riddance’ to overcrowded cities and rubbish-strewn natural wonders. Is there any way to reinvent an industry that does so much damage?" The end of tourism?
Covid-19 will not bring the end of overtourism. In the UK a major incident was declared on England's south coast as services were ‘completely overstretched’ as visitors defied advice to stay away. The local authority was was forced to instigate a multi-agency emergency response to tackle issues ranging from overcrowding on the beaches, traffic gridlock and violence. Security guards had to be used to protect refuse collection teams. Council leader Vikki Slade said they were "absolutely appalled at the scenes witnessed on our beaches". "The irresponsible behaviour and actions of so many people is just shocking and our services are stretched to the absolute hilt trying to keep everyone safe. We have had no choice now but to declare a major incident and initiate an emergency response," she added. The council said it issued a record 558 parking fines. more

9. Resilience requires preparedness
While there are some grounds for optimism that an effective vaccine may be developed and be widely available this is not certain and it will take time. Those countries which locked down quickly and had test, trace and isolate up and running rapidly avoided large numbers of deaths and hospitalisations. Many of those countries had recent experience of previous epidemics and had maintained their preparedness.  The pandemic is still growing globally and further spikes and local lockdowns are occurring, a second wave remains a real risk.  Destinations and tourism businesses need to ensure that they are prepared for another.
Our World in Data researches and publishes regular updates on the Covid-19 pandemic, visit their site for updates.  The data on positive tests tells us something about the prevalence of the virus in the population. The daily data on new confirmed cases clearly shows that pandemic is far from beaten. Source: Our World in Data

10. Miscellany
The 70 best and worst firms for travel refunds: new MSE survey – Virgin and Loveholidays join Ryanair at the bottom
Seychelles Tourism Minister Didier Dogley wasted no time, and mixed no words, stating no cruise ships will sail in our out of Port Victoria until 2022, at the earliest. The move, effective immediately cuts a significant angle of tourism out of the Seychelles tourism economy, but the minister believes there are safer, better ways to recover them.
SDGs Key to (Re)Building Tourism with an Eye Toward the Future available on Sustainable Brands
Barcelona has launched a new Live Barcelona Market Place
Visit Durango in Colorado is conducting a countywide resident sentiment survey and they are adopting Responsible Tourism. "To begin our own journey of responsible tourism and what that means for the Durango area, we have created a Responsible Tourism Pledge: . This pledge helps educate visitors about Leave No Trace, fire safety and other issues important to our community. We want to get to the crux of the issues and make real change." more
Great Green Wall 21 African countries are joining together to build a 4,750-mile wall of trees

 


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RT NewsWTM

Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 06/2020

  1. Covid-19 remains a crisis in many parts of the world
  2. The World Responsible Tourism Awards in the Year of Covid-19
  3. Tourism in a Covid World 
  4. Decarbonising Aviation 
  5. Racism in Tourism
  6. Responsible Tourism in India
  7. Build Back Better?
  8. Wildlife & Biodiversity 
  9. Travel Tomorrow
  10. Involving your clients in sustainability

    There is now so much news that from July Responsible Tourism News will be published fortnightly on or around the 15th and the end of the month. 


Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on RT. 

1. Covid-19 remains a crisis in many parts of the world
As The Economist pointed out at the beginning of the month poorer countries account for some three-quarters of the 100,000 or so new cases detected around the world each day. "Richer countries can do much to help. Some stricken places will need donations of simple supplies like testing kits and protective gear. Others will need debt relief, to free money to fight the disease." The tourism industry and our clients could help too. In the good times we sell these destinations, we should support them in the bad times too.
As this newsletter goes to pres there are close to 500,000 deaths and 10,000,000 confirmed case. The date is regularly updated on The Guardian website.

The Caribbean, Africa
At end of May Rafat Ali of Skift wrote that "we have to examine the controversial and unmistakable role of our industry of travel — the movement and the gathering of humans — in this, especially as the reopening of travel is gaining momentum every day. We can’t just hurtle into reopening with fingers in our ears. After all, our industry’s output, the globe of travelers, has been the biggest vectors of spreading the virus around the world. " And "We have to be willing to say that cruises were a super-spreader of the virus, despite knowing the risks of continuing with the sailings for weeks and months. We have to be willing to say restarting cruises early is the worst idea ever, and the industry’s biggest death wish if rebound “virus cruises” happen again." We should but will we?
As Steve Witt of Not Just Travel and The Travel Franchise has argued in Travel Weekly responsible travel must now embrace " our new found respect for freedom, health and each other’s space." And hopefully: "Responsible tourism means a greater respect and support for those in the tourism and hospitality industry who need to make a living with more costs and potentially less customers."
African tourism has been put on ice by coronavirus – here’s how some countries are reviving it more
In Indonesia the Covid-19 pandemic is challenging the survival of thousands of small and medium enterprises in tourism that will need creative crowdfunding philanthropic investment to stay afloat financially. more

WTM Responsible Tourism Awards

2. The World Responsible Tourism Awards in the Year of Covid-19
Covid has revealed the importance of tourism. When it stopped the contribution which tourism made, until the crisis,  to the livelihoods of local people and the maintenance of wildlife and habitat became all too apparent.  Some tourism businesses have taken responsibility and used their assets and their relationships with travellers, agents and suppliers to support communities and conservation. This year the World Responsible Tourism Awards have been refashioned to address the Covid-19 crisis. We are looking to recognise and commend those who have seen the impact of the crisis on communities and wildlife and responded.

There is a crisis: local people and wildlife dependent on tourism need your support
The Awards are open for nominations until 3rd August, you can nominate yourself and others simply by sending us a few details, and you can nominate as many times as you like.  Remember if you are not nominated, by yourself or someone else, you can't bb recognised or be commended.

3. Tourism in a Covid World
Hopefully there will be a vaccine and Covid will be controlled.  But for now, and for some time to come, we have to live with Covid-19.
WTTC has, with multiple partners, developed  'Safe Travels': Global Protocols & Stamp for the New Normal. #SAFETRAVELS. The protocols will be published  in phases  for at least eleven industries, including; Hospitality, Attractions, Outdoor Retail, Aviation, Airports, Short Term Rentals, Cruise, Tour Operators, Convention Centres and MICE, Car Rental and Insurance.
Inge Huijbrechts leading on the responsibility and safety & security agenda for the Radisson Hotel Group. Hear the latest thinking on post-Covid-19 hospitality, managing hotels and the supply chain and about advancing the responsibility agenda when resources are limited. video

Kempinski Hotels has produced a video explaining what they have done to ensure client and staff safety in their hotels.

The UNWTO has published a One Planet Vision for the Responsible Recovery of the Tourism Sector structured around six lines of action to guide responsible tourism recovery for people, planet and prosperity, namely public health, social inclusion, biodiversity conservation, climate action, circular economy and governance and finance. UNWTO's Global Guidelines to Restart Tourism were published at the end of May.

Spain has introduced a self-certification stamp of approval for businesses  which assert their compliance with official guidelines approved by the Ministry of Health. There no monitoring of compliance, but the seal must be renewed every year. more
In the UK VisitBritain has launched a ‘We’re Good To Go’ industry standard and supporting mark means businesses across the sector can demonstrate that they are adhering to the respective Government and public health guidance, have carried out a COVID-19 risk assessment and check they have the required processes in place. Coupled with a a ‘Know Before You Go’ public information campaign to support tourism in England as businesses start to re-open, reassuring visitors as restrictions are lifted by checking about what it is safe to do and when, and sign-posting to information about destinations and available services before travelling. more
Aran islanders have chose  ‘health over wealth’ as businesses remain shut, an Inis Oírr poll showed 92 per cent don’t want to risk a coronavirus outbreak with tourism return
Iceland is offering a choice: 14 days of quarantine or a a COVID-19 test upon arrival
St Lucia is implementing a responsible reopening plan 

4. Decarbonising Aviation
Arctic Circle temperatures have hit new highs reaching a scorching 38C (100F) in Verkhoyansk, a Siberian town. The Arctic is believed to be warming twice as fast as the global average. We cannot self isolate from climate change. Some airlines, for example KLM, have responded to challenge but most want to carry on with business as usual. In the UK Alok Sharma the the government minister responsible for business and climate change said earlier this month that "“COP26 can be a moment where the world unites behind a fairer, greener recovery from the effects of Covid-19. A recovery which delivers for both our people and our planet.” Hew was luancing the COP 26 Race to Zero UNFCC campaign.

The UK government has launched a Jet Zero Council:, a new collaborative initiative to decarbonise aviation;  a coalition of Ministers, businesses, trade bodies and environmental groups who will collaboratively work to align the aviation sector with the 2050 net-zero target. The UK Sustainable Aviation Coalition recently published a roadmap to achieve net-zero. Their roadmap focuses on fuel from waste, gives a low priority to electric aircraft and insists  that the UK’s aviation sector can grow by 70% over the next three decades without breaching climate targets – the UK Committee on Climate Change rejected this plan for business as usual.
For too long the aviation industry has been told that there is no alternative. TINA has been dominant. That is changing. There is an alternative. 
WTM hosted a symposium on  decarbonising aviation with presentations from leading research scientists, engineers and policy makers on the zero carbon fuels which are now within our reach. Aviation is not the problem. The problem is the dirty fuel they burn. The transition to clean fuels needs to begin now. Brief reports of the contributions from each of the speakers can be read here and videos of their presentations  are here.

5. Racism in Tourism
Alex Temblador has explained the problem eloquently. "The travel industry tends to think of itself as a space of leisure, fun, and escape where such things like racism are left behind for good times. The problem is, for black individuals and people of color, escaping racism is not something they can do by taking a vacation. Racism, like in many other sectors of society, has been built into the travel industry, both knowingly and unknowingly." more
The tourism industry needs to take responsibility and address racism throughout the sector. PwC and TTG have published a report arguing the business case for doing so. Download  Conde Nast Traveler  are reporting that the Black Travel Alliance has launched a  Black Travel Scorecard, which will evaluate destinations and travel brands under five key areas and they are promoting  Black-owned businesses, including tour groups like Experience Real Cartagena and African Lisbon Tours, which seek to amplify Black history or culture in a destination. Read the views of ten BAME people about the issues we need too address .

Justin Francis has described the broad agenda, changing attitudes, opening up travel, ensuring that more money finds its way into local hands,  finding ways to address and stop conscious or unconscious racist behaviour towards travellers of colour, ensuring that BAME communities are consulted about the impact tourism has on them. more

We need to take responsibility and address racism, in tourism 

6. Responsible Tourism in India
RT in India is often mistakenly assumed to exist only in Kerala. It is true that Kerala is the world's leading destination for RT but there are examples of award winning RT experiences all over the subcontinent. You can find a growing list of RT Award winners online.  ICRT India has a series of webinars with speakers from all over India. You can find details of the webinars on the Responsible Tourism Partnership website and set an alert to receive details.  In India as elsewhere "Community-based tourism organisations have been at the
forefront of providing relief to those most affected by the Covid-19 lockdown. They need your support to continue providing financial aid to help the most vulnerable." Details and donations here.

Manish Pande of Village Ways is one of the leading lights in the newly energetic ICRT India - there are a couple of interviews with her here. Rupesh Kumar has been widely recognised as a leader in RT having successfully led the RT Mission in Kerala since 2008. He too is a leader in the ICRT India, you can read an interview with him here. Incredible India is incredible in part for its rich diversity. Kerala locked down early and brought the virus under control. CGH Earth Hotels went further, Jose Dominic winner of a Judges' World Responsible Tourism Award characteristically went further than most. Out first and foremost responsibility is not the customer; it is our staff and people. We shut the hotels... We told all the employees to go home..." and maintain social distancing. more

Post-Covid Kerala is marketing to tier-II cities in south India. The campaign will project domestic travel as the best bet to break the lockdown fatigue among citizens. Kerala Tourism is planning to launch packages to extend length of stay through a focus on ‘learning experiences.’ Art, craft, culture, culinary skills amd martial arts are all planned. more The monsoon remains an under-marketed experience - enjoy it virtually.

7. Build Back Better?
The UNWTO's #TravelTomorrow message, "embraced by so many, is one of responsibility, hope and determination." However, with international arrivals estimated to be down by up to 80% this year there are plenty of people hoping that tourism will grow back better, in a greener and more sustainable way. The UNWTO's regional estimates are depressing/. WTTC is predicting 100m job losses with 75% of these in the G20 countries. Industry leaders, politicians, government and those who depend on tourism to feed themselves and their families. BAU, business as usual will be seen as the best way back. There are some signs of changes in a relatively few places and we should celebrate those, but this will be rare.  There is aspiration, for example in Thailand, is real, but delivery and implementation will be the bigger challenge.

In Venice Paola Mar, the city’s councillor for tourism is urging officials to use  the pause to rethink “an entire Venice system”, with sustainability and quality tourism at its core.
"Part of the plan is to lure locals back to live permanently in the city. The mayor is in discussions with universities, aiming to offer tourist rentals to students, and old buildings are being restored for social housing. Measures to control visitor numbers – including a tax on day trippers, which was due to be introduced in July – will go ahead next year, while the debate around cruise ships continues.   “Our goal is to trigger a renaissance of the city,” said Mar. “We want to attract visitors for longer stays and encourage a ‘slower’ type of tourism. Things can’t go back to how they were.”  more  The issue of overtoursm remains a major concern in Venice   Venice is empty and some want it to stay that way.

Venetian protesters formed a human chain along one of the city's iconic canals, demanding responsible tourism in the post-coronavirus period. Amsterdammers have launched petition to tackle overtourism. Launched on June 9th by 28 June there were close to 30,000 signatures. This proposal will now have to be considered by the city council. There is a broad citizens' movement to control tourism in Amsterdam. more
In Amsterdam the mayor urged extreme caution in reopening to tourists, while nonprofit group Amsterdam&Partners believes the tourist hiatus pushes to the top of the agenda plans to cut numbers, give Amsterdam back to locals and attract the “right” kind of visitor, and has launched a sustainability taskforce to map the way forward. “The main focus is that we want a sustainable visitor economy that doesn’t harm the livability of our city. If you have the right balance between living, working and visiting, you can have the right visitor economy. That’s what went wrong in the last years in the old city centre, and we have to entice locals to discover their city centre again.” more

Toronto in common with many cities in countries with a domestic tourism market the focus is on the local tourist. In Barcelona Mateo Asensioof the Barcelona tourist board. “Our first task is getting locals back out into the city, then the domestic market and our neighbours. When the international market returns, we’ll focus more on specific sectors. It’s an opportunity to change the rules.” more  Athens: two new bike lanes are to be created. The centre is being at least temporarily pedestrianised and the space made available for local restaurants, cafes and bars to expand. Prague is taking steps to rebrand itself as a cultural and gastronomic destination.  Berlin is introducing 14 miles of new bike lanes. Paris is increasing cycle lanes. There are fewer examples of initiatives outside of cities.

As Justin Francis has pointed out the  first rule of being a great city break destination is to focus on becoming the best place to live – and trust that tourism will follow.  The death of the office and the further depopulation of city centres is a major threat. Justin has published 11 steps to city resilience. How many will take them?

GLP Presents #TourismStrong Video Series. A series of hopeful and honest conversations to inspire you as they’ve inspired us. They have published a free report with key takeaways from their travel industry peers—TourismStrong: Insights to Survive & Thrive Post-COVID-19

8. Wildlife & Biodiversity
"Pandemics such as coronavirus are the result of humanity’s destruction of nature, according to leaders at the UN, WHO and WWF International, and the world has been ignoring this stark reality for decades." There has been a series of warnings since March, with the world’s leading biodiversity experts saying even more deadly disease outbreaks are likely in future unless the rampant destruction of the natural world is rapidly halted. more  We have seen many diseases emerge over the years – such as Zika, Aids, Sars and Ebola – and although they are quite different at first glance, they all originated from animal populations under conditions of severe environmental pressures. And they all illustrate that our destructive behaviour towards nature is endangering our own health – a stark reality we’ve been collectively ignoring for decades. Research indicates that most emerging infectious diseases are driven by human activities. more  World Animal Protection  organised 200 organizations to sign an open letter to the UN World Tourism Organisation urging them to call for all captive wildlife entertainment to be completely phased out of the global tourism industry. To minimise the risk of future pandemics, protect the health of tourists and tourism workers and to protect all wildlife species. Read the full open letter here.

The conservationist Chris Sandbrook spells out the problem, in stark terms: "The nature based tourism sector has collapsed, fieldwork is often impossible, and donors are withdrawing funds. This represents a serious challenge to conservation, which will endure for years to come. At the same time, there may be a glimmer of hope in that the situation could open up new possibilities for transformative change in relations between people and non-human nature."  He concludes "The covid-19 has triggered a crisis for public health, for biodiversity, for the economic system, and for the conservation sector. The world will never be quite the same again. The question is, what kind of world will emerge?"  What will the tourism sector contribute to secure the future of the wildlife and habitat which is such a key part of our sector but for which we have paid too little, for too long

In Thailand captive elephants are being led into the mountains to find food. more  The Spanish multinational company Iberostar Group has become the first tourism business to fund the Global Sustainable Seafood Initiative (GSSI).

9. Travel Tomorrow
António Buscardini explains Travel Tomorrow balancing sustainability and economic recovery post C-19. The tourism of tomorrow will be rooted in local communities. In neighbourhoods , villages and cities that thrive, and as a result, enjoy welcoming enthusiastic visitors. A flourishing community is very much connected to its specific place; where people work together, where visitors feel at home and residents can nurture and share their love for the place. 

 

10. Involving your clients in sustainability
Christopher Warren, aka the Green Butler, explains why culture and engaging clients in responsibly managing their resource use is good for business.

 


The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News

RT Video Channel

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Better Tourism Africa
Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

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Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD  #RTourismNews

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