WTM Special ¦ RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 10/ 2021

  1. RT at WTM London 1-3 November & 8-9 November
  2. Carbon & COP26 "never mind the patter watch the hands"
  3. The 2021 WTM World Responsible Tourism Awards 
  4. The future for  Travel & Tourism is Hydrogen
  5. Developments in Aviation 
  6. Net Zero Hotels
  7. Decarbonising Travel & Tourism
  8. Carbon Labelling 
  9. Biodiversity, nature positive 
  10. Miscellany 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
2022 RT Events
June 5-12  Responsible Tourism  Summer School, Finland  Jyväskylä, Central Finland & Helsinki
The 15th International Conference on Responsible Tourism takes place June 9-10   Advancing Responsible Tourism

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of December 
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

    1. RT at WTM London 1-3 November & 8-9 November
      The Responsible Tourism Programme is more diverse this year as we prepare for 2022, when we shall be reflecting on and assessing the progress made over the twenty years since the Cape Town Declaration in 2002. Next year Responsible Tourism will be at the heart of the WTM, London.  The full programme is hereThis year many of the elements of the RT programme are new or significantly changed since last year.

      1. The traditional panel discussions are focused this year on solutions, decarbonising our industry, contributing to conservation and the recovery of nature and destination resilience.
      2. The presentation of the first  WTM Global RT Awards and the regional awards from India and the Rest of the World Full details of all those being recognised will be posted here at 18:30 (UK) on 1st November
        I
        ndia Awards  ¦   Rest of the World ¦ Global Awards
        The WTM Africa and Latin America Awards will be presented at the shows in 2022
      3. New this year, a panel on Responsible Technology for Travel & Tourism in the Travel Forward and Travel Tech programmes, the beginning a new strand in the Responsible Tourism
      4. The Platform for Change and a series of interviews with Tourism Leaders, available on-demand at WTM and on the Platform for Change, which will be at the heart of the WTM's shows through 2022 and culminate in debate at WTM, London in November 2022. As President Biden has pointed out, this is the critical decade and the Platform for Change presents tried and tested solutions many identified through the Responsible Tourism Awards since their launch in 2004
      5. Decarbonising Travel & Tourism. We have three on-demand panels discussing what solutions are available for aviation, the accommodation sector and our operators, ground handlers and transport providers
      6. Why Storytelling Matters in Tourism, a panel discussion available on demand
      7. We are launching the 2022 WTM Global Responsible Tourism Awards categories, which will open for applications and nominations on December 1st

      The interviews with tourism leaders are with
      Jane Ashton, Sustainability Director, easyJet expressing enthusiasm for the future of hydrogen-powered aviation and sustainable growth. video
      Martin Brackenbury, previously President IFTO and UNWTO The conversation ranged over previous experiences of avian flu, MERS & SARS and how the travel and tourism industry learns to live with Covid  video
      John Coplin, FRAE, RB211 aero-engine Chief Designer, then Director of Technology and Design at Rolls Royce John speaks with passion about why tourism matters and argues that the engineers need to be funded to make the transition to hydrogen, it needs to happen faster across the world in the next ten years. video
      Shannon Guihan,  Chief TreadRight & Sustainability Officer for The Travel Corporation Shannon interviews Harold Goodwin about the Platform for Change video
      Inge Huijbrechts, Global Sustainability & Security Senior Executive, Radisson Hotels Group: We talked about the impact of Covid on hotels, what it has meant for sustainability and what needs to be done to encourage all accommodation owners and operators to adopt sustainability - progress needs to be faster. video:
      Clare Jenkinson, Head of Sustainability at ABTA: Trust, Covid as a catalyst for change and developments amongst travel agents and tour operators video~
      Chris Lyle, International Aviation Policy Consultant: Chris argues that responsibility for overseeing the essential reduction in greenhouse gas emissions should pass from ICAO to UNFCCC.  Aviation is not progressing rapidly enough to  Net-Zero. video
      Eric Ricaute, Founder & CEO, Greenview: Eric talks about the pressure from the banks and investors to ensure that new hotels and reports are sustainable, the wave of change and hints at a new tool soon to be launched to measure Net-Zero. video
      John Sage, President at Accessible Travel Solutions: John describes the processes that tourism businesses and destinations need to use to become more inclusive and cater for people with disabilities and we talk about why it matters. video
      Becca Samson, Sustainability & CSR Lead at Booking.com: We talk about the continuing growth in consumer demand for sustainable tourism and about what Booking.com is doing on its platform to enable consumers to find sustainable product and purchase it. video
      James Thornton, CEO, Intrepid Travel: We talk about what Intrepid is doing, its willingness to share the sustainability tools it has developed and the importance of sustainability going mainstream in our sector. video
      Garry Wilson, CEO, easyJet holidays: Garry talks about his ambition at easyJet to create mainstream Responsible Tousim holidays and his enthusiasm for hydrogen.  video


2. Carbon & COP26: "never mind the patter watch the hands"
For sure there will be a great deal of posturing at COP 26, there will be many announcements, policies and declarations.
As President Biden has asserted this is the critical decade, it is time for action. Procrastination is common and has multiple causes ranging from laziness and the understandable if unacceptable desire to avoid doing something with unpleasant consequences for the individual or people required to take the necessary action. Business as usual is preferred, leaving to other groups of people or states in our contemporary world in the future – for example, net-zero by 2050 – to deal with the problem, thus leaving it to our children and grandchildren. The Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Office,   “At the current rate of increase in greenhouse gas concentrations, we will see a temperature increase by the end of this century far above the Paris Agreement targets of 1.5 to 2C above pre-industrial levels.” Politicians continue to make promises for future leaders with commitments for Net-Zero by 2050, setting aside concerns that net-zero is a dangerous trap. It is dangerous because it perpetuates a belief in technological salvation in the future, which undermines the need to cut emissions now.
Words are no longer enough.
We know that nations are lobbying to change the report on the state of the climate to be presented at COP26:" Saudi Arabia, Japan and Australia are among countries asking the UN to play down the need to move rapidly away from fossil fuels." Current global pledges put the world on track for 2.9C of warming, according to the organisation Climate Action Tracker. The amounts of CO2, methane and nitrous oxide rose by more than the annual average in the past 10 years.
In 2015, 43% of those polled wanted strong action, but that has risen to 58% now. In China, the percentage of respondents wanting to see their country play a leadership role has increased from 18% in 2015 to 46% now. India has also seen a rise from 38% then to 56% now, and the US from 45% of respondents in 2015 to 56% now. In 2015 almost 50% of Russians wanted their government to take a leadership role, now only  38% do.
As scientists have long warned positive feedback loops may accelerate climate change. A
 study of  planet-warming gases emitted from and absorbed by forests in Unesco World Heritage sites has revealed that 10  protected forests have emitted more carbon than they locked away over the past 20 years. more


 3. The 2021 WTM World Responsible Tourism Awards
The India, Rest of the World and Global Awards will be presented at WTM, London on 1st November.

The judges' reasons will be posted online early on 2nd November.
New this year are the Global Responsible Tourism Awards selected from amongst the Gold Award winners across the WTM Responsible Tourism Awards family.

The 2021 WTM, India Responsible Tourism Awards

The 2021 WTM, Rest of the World Responsible Tourism Awards

The 2021 WTM, Global Responsible Tourism Awards

The Africa and Latin America Awards will be announced at WTM Africa and WTM Latin America in 2022.

The 2022 Award will open on December 1st, full details in the next edition of RTNews


4. The future for  Travel & Tourism is Hydrogen

John Coplin, FRAE, RB211 aero-engine Chief Designer, then Director of Technology and Design at Rolls Royce speaks with passion about why tourism matters and argues that the engineers need to be funded to make the transition to hydrogen, it needs to happen faster across the world in the next ten years.

Jane Ashton, Sustainability Director, easyJet expressing enthusiasm for the future of hydrogen-powered aviation and sustainable growth. 

There is growing optimism about the production of green hydrogen.  more New South Wales in Australia has launched a   hydrogen strategy that aims to make the state a “hydrogen superpower.” The NSW strategy provides up to up to $3 billion in incentives and exemptions for ‘green’ hydrogen production, as well as a hydrogen refuelling station network to be rolled out across the state, on top of $70 million already committed for hydrogen hubs. A change essential to allow coal to be left in the ground. 


5. Developments in Aviation

Bio-based feedstock availability for SAF will likely only be sufficient to supply 50% of the SAF required to meet IATA’s net-zero carbon by 2050 target. more
Back in January, the Fuelling Flight Project, which includes airlines & airports, pointed to "the risk of massive capital investments in things that increase emissions compared to fossil fuels and/or that become stranded assets" and called for "future proof sustainability requirements" higher than the ones in the European Commission's Renewable Energy Directive including "clear exclusions of unsustainable feedstocks and pathways such as biofuels from dedicated cropland and PFAD." [Palm Fatty Acid Distillate] The group has called for higher sustainability standards before SAF is prioritised and ramped up.
Any delay in action exacerbates the issue. There may well be a  need to think the unthinkable and cap airline operations. For more, please see this interview with Chris LyleInternational Aviation Policy Consultant, who suggests how we might get the aviation industry to move away from fossil fuels –from ICAO to UNFCCC. If aviation is to make its required contribution to the Paris Agreement targets, emissions would have to be reduced by at least half from 2019 levels by 2030 and to zero carbon by 2050.  This entails reinforced mitigation policy and action, starting right now. more
Meanwhile, less disruptive solutions are favoured, despite the scant evidence that they can deliver at the scale required.
Heathrow has called on the government to mandate the use of sustainable aviation fuels and provide a price-support mechanism and loan guarantees,  to help the industry lower carbon emissions while fending off pressure from climate groups to curtail air travel.


6. Net Zero Hotels

Eric Ricaute, Founder & CEO, Greenview,  talks about the pressure from the banks and investors to ensure that new hotels and reports are sustainable, the wave of change and hints at a new tool soon to be launched to measure Net-Zero. video
A consultation draft of the Net Zero Methodology for Hotels, which has been developed by Greenview in collaboration with Tourism Declares, PATA, the Sustainable Hospitality Alliance and WTTC. The methodology aims to define a common approach and serve as the referential methodology that can be used by all stakeholders in the tourism value chain when addressing net-zero in developing, owning, operating, franchising, booking and staying in hotels and will be finalised by the end of November. 
The 2021 Cornell Hotel Sustainability Benchmarking (CHSB) Index, now in its eighth year shows that hotels around the world reduced the average carbon emissions intensity by 3% in 2019. This reflects the local power generation profile. The country with the lowest average hotel carbon intensity is Uruguay at 11.1kg CO2e/m2. In Uruguay, 97% of electricity is generated from renewable sources.
Google labels eco-certified hotels as sustainable travel demand rises, listing their practices based on 29 certification programmes to help travellers make more informed decisions.


7. Decarbonising Travel & Tourism

Available on-demand at WTM, London

Fossil fuel is why aviation is travel and tourism's Achilles heel. Is hydrogen the answer? The panellists discuss how aviation can transition quickly to zero-carbon flying, and debate issues such as carbon offsetting and sustainable aviation fuel – and the more radical alternative: hydrogen.
Jane Ashton, Sustainability Director at easyJet;
John Strickland, Director at JLS Consulting;
Keith Bushell, UK Environmental Affairs Stakeholder Manager at Airbus;
Adam Freeman, Group Head of Environmental Strategy, MAG.

Reducing carbon emissions in the accommodation sector showcases the best practices in reducing emissions in designing and building new hotels and retrofitting existing properties – and ask: are zero-emissions hotels possible?
Eric Ricaurte, of Greenview, Singapore;
HC Vinayaka from ITC Hotels, India; and
Claire Whitely, Sustainable Hospitality Alliance.

Reducing carbon emissions: tour operators, ground handlers and transport providers, panellists talk about how they have taken carbon out of their operations.
Sam Bruce, Much Better Adventures;
Dr Susanne Etti, Intrepid Travel;
Arnaud Masson, Sightseeing Business Line.


8. Carbon Labelling

Buying a cleaner, less polluting flight is not necessarily more expensive. By exercising, informed choice consumers can pressure the airline to reduce their emissions. This form of labelling empowers consumers to make better, more sustainable choices, reveals the performance of different airlines and leaves the responsibility for reducing emissions with the airlines, which is where it belongs. Go to the Google flights search engine and key in origin airport and destination. Select London JFK and sort by CO2 emissions.  You could book a flight emitting 505kg CO2 (34% below average emissions on the route) and 1.65 tonnes (+116%). If you select the cheapest, the search engine also reveals the emissions performance, for the dates I searched on the airline’s emissions were 2% higher (+12Kg CO2).  more
International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) analysis shows that on average, the least-emitting itinerary on a US route releases 63% less carbon than the most-emitting option, and 22% less than the average option. Therefore, making emissions data available at the point of ticket purchase is important in helping consumers make informed choices. The ICCT has done a comparative analysis of the four platforms which provide carbon labelling: Skyscanner, Kayak.com, LiteFlights and Google Flights and found significant variance and conclude that further work is needed. But they conclude, "optimistic that consumer preferences for low-emitting flights can shape the market for air travel going forward. Airlines operating less carbon-intensive flights stand to benefit." more


9. Biodiversity - nature positive 

Just Francis, of Responsible Travel, has articulated a new goal "to make every trip “nature positive” by 2030. Just as being “climate positive” goes a step further than being carbon neutral - not just cancelling out carbon production, but actively removing carbon from the atmosphere - this travel ethos aims to leave the environments we visit not just in the same state that we found them, but better off. Justin "explains, nature positive travel is achieved by ensuring every single step of their customer’s journey has the lightest footprint possible on the planet, and then going beyond that and contributing positively to the destination." more
"When it comes to rewildling, responsible tourism has a significant role to play. Like it or not, choices about how land is used – for nature, development or intensive agriculture – are financial. If we are seeking to persuade local people and landowners in favour of rewilding over other land uses, it will need to provide some commercial benefit – and responsible nature tourism does just that, bringing jobs and economic opportunity to local communities." more
Concern is being raised in Washington about the traditional conservation model which has often excluded indigenous and local people,  the "fortress conservation" model has come under attack in the US House Natural Resources Committee. more


10. Miscellany

 


 

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD

WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

 

RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 09/ 2021

  1. RT at WTM London 1-3 November & 8-9 November
  2. Labelling Matters
  3. Biodiversity: nature matters to tourism
  4. Destination Initiatives 
  5. Child Exploitation Resumes 
  6. Decarbonising Travel & Tourism
  7. Climate Change 
  8. easyJet
  9. Covid 
  10. Miscellany 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
2022 RT Events
June 5-12  Responsible Tourism  Summer School, Finland  Jyväskylä, Central Finland & Helsinki
The 15th International Conference on Responsible Tourism takes place June 9-10   Advancing Responsible Tourism

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of November 
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1. RT at WTM London 1-3 November & 8-9 November
There are four blended RT panels at WTM, London this year on November 1st & 2nd. There will be a large number of on-demand interviews with tourism leaders available on all five days of WTM, London. There are panels on 1st November  Decarbonising the Travel & Tourism SectorHow can the travel and tourism industry contribute more to conservation?; 'Buiding Back Better' for Destination Resilience; 2nd November, Responsible Technology for Travel & Tourism The details are here.  The WTM Responsible Tourism Awards will be presented at 17:30 on 1st November: the India and Rest of the World Awards and the Global Responsible Tourism Awards.     WTM Registration link for attendance at ExCel or virtually

The Directory for the Platform for Change being developed for the World Travel Market by the Responsible Tourism Partnership is now published.  more


2. Labelling Matters
What's in a Label?
The travel and tourism industry has generated a plethora of labels and certification schemes as businesses and destinations seek market advantage. Greenwashing is rife in the sector. Labels need to be credible if they are to have real value for consumers. Unilever is set to introduce carbon footprint labels on 30,000 products by the end of 2021.

Guix, Oilé and Font have just published in Tourism Management on “trustworthy or misleading communication of voluntary carbon offsets in the aviation industry.”They looked at the communication strategies of 37 airlines. They analysed “the trustworthy or misleading attributes of the messages as they are applied to: i) the type of claim (product, process, fact or image), and ii) the nature of the claim (fibbing, hidden trade-off, no proof, vagueness, irrelevance, lesser of two evils or worshipping false labels)”.They conclude that 56% of claims are trustworthy and 44% misleading. The paper, which is freely available online, ranks the performance of the airlines.
As the authors conclude: “We delved into the specific ways in which customers face deceptive and obfuscated communication that is difficult to acknowledge, discern or verify, because it lacks proof, is vague, is oversold without considering the limitations of VCO and/or misrepresents the scientific realities of flying or offsetting. Airlines provide persuasive arguments for their business model by shifting responsibility to customers in framing VCO as ‘the’ solution for customers to act green; they highlight benefits for the customer and the environment while providing the moral license to continue flying.”

Some forms of labelling can change purchasing decisions can cause businesses to reduce emissions 
Booking.com's research was published back in June revealing that around half of respondents found it difficult to find sustainable hotels. Without clear,  authoritative reliable labelling, consumers cannot make informed decisions. Google is now assigning some hotels a green “Eco-certified” label next to a small leaf symbol immediately to the right of the property’s rating and encouraging them to list their sustainability efforts. more Google does not independently verify the claims made by the hotel. On the other hand, it is the owners and managers of the hotels who are making the specific claims. Whilst consumers have no way of seeking compensation from a certifying agency for greenwashing, there is no contract, the consumer can, in many jurisdictions, demand compensation for misselling where the hotel makes false claims about its sustainability.
Consumers have good reason to avoid purchasing carbon offsets, like medieval pardons, they may salve their conscience, but it takes the pressure off the aviation industry to decarbonise. And that is a bad thing.
In 2018 Atmosfair produced an airline index to assist travellers in identifying those airlines with the lowest carbon emissions but the information was not route-specific. Predictably those airlines flying the most modern planes, point to point and with the highest passenger loading performed best.

Google have worked their magic with big data and consumers can now choose a lower emissions flight. Go to the Google flights search engine and key in origin airport and destination. Select London JFK and sort by CO2 emissions.  You could book a flight emitting 505kg CO2 (34% below average emissions on the route) and 1.65 tonnes (+116%). If you select the cheapest the search engine also reveals the emissions performance, for the dates I searched on the airline's emissions were  2% higher (+12Kg CO2).  The data is not perfect, where you sit on the plane will affect your emissions, first-class seats are heavier and take up more space, but it is a good start. 'Google Flights uses over 300 partners, like airlines, online travel agencies and aggregators to display flight information including flight options, prices, and schedules.'  more
Google uses the European Environmental Agency (EEA) emission estimates with the most up-to-date algorithmic model from 2019. They explain how they calculate the emissions here and here.

This form of labelling empowers consumers to make better, more sustainable choices, reveals the performance of different airlines and leaves the responsibility for reducing emissions with the airlines, which is where it belongs.

At, last carbon labelling on flights. 


3. Biodiversity: nature matters to tourism
As Justin Francis has written in The Independent  Every single holiday we take relies on nature – and impacts on it, too. Tourism has to change to protect it. Whether a city break or ecotourism every holiday consumes nature, we need to work to become nature positive.

As the 15th UN Biodiversity Conference opens virtually a Biodiversity Intactness Index, which estimates the percentage of natural biodiversity that remains across the world and in individual countries, has been published. The UK's industrial revolution transformed landscapes and destroyed biodiversity. "The UK is one of the world's most nature-depleted countries - in the bottom 10% globally and last among the G7 group of nations, it has an average of about half its biodiversity left, far below the global average of 75%, a study has found. Biodiversity is declining faster than at any time in human history. Since 1970, there has been on average almost a 70% decline in the populations of mammals, birds, fish, reptiles and amphibians. It is thought that one million animal and plant species - almost a quarter of the global total - are threatened with extinction." more & more 
In the UK the Council for Sustainable Business has. with the support of the UK government. mounted a Get Nature Positive campaign which challenges businesses to take urgent action to address the loss of biodiversity and climate change: "A nature positive approach puts nature and biodiversity gain at the heart of decision-making and design." As they point out "Every business involved in making a holiday experience is also part of the impact tourism has on the natural world." They identify the key challenges: pollution; over-exploitation; land-use change; climate change and invasive species and suggest ways of meeting each of the challenges. more 
The San Diego Parks & Recreation Department orchestrated the emergency closure after months of reports of beach-goers bothering, and in a few cases harming, sea lions and their pups. Point La Jolla is a rocky area where sea lions often go on land to rest. It also is a sea lion birthing area where the annual pupping season is recognized from June 1 to Oct. 31. Cllr LaCava told the La Jolla Community Planning Association  that a “responsible tourism” public education campaign and a sign program telling people to keep their distance from the sea lions were “not particularly effective” and that the city had decided to take “more assertive steps.” more

A new report by the Luc Hoffmann Institute – The Future of Nature-Based Tourism: Impacts of COVID-19 and paths to sustainability – outlines the challenges facing the nature-based tourism sector and offers recommendations for future resilience and sustainability. An EU survey cited in the report found that 543 tourism operators working in African protected areas collectively employed 48,000 people, of whom more than half were recruited locally. On average, 65% of local staff members were on reduced wages and hours because of the pandemic, and more than half have put some (or all) of their local employees on leave without pay since February 2020. An estimated 94% of local employees would be affected by being on reduced wages, unpaid leave, being made redundant or unemployed if the crisis continues.

The World Bank has developed and published a  Collaborative Management Partnership Toolkit is a resource guide to support the identification and establishment of such partnerships. It raises awareness of the role of these partnerships in reducing the massive protected area funding gap, catalyzing rural development and supporting job creation.

Uttarakhand to deploy women as wildlife safari drivers, and nature guides across all tiger reserves and wildlife sanctuaries. Until now only men were employed. Times of India 


4. Destination Initiatives
Scotland has launched a campaign to encourage visitors to embrace 'slow travel', encouraging people to spend more time in one place, seek out lesser-known destinations, and explore environmentally-friendly options for travelling around. VisitScotland will be repositioned as a place to “slow down, re-charge, escape and enjoy immersive and sustainable tourism experiences.” This year Highlands Council, which includes the North Coast 500 had 17 rangers carry out 1100 patrols promoting and advising on responsible access to the countryside. They also carried out duties to keep tidy, maintain and manage council-owned sites and public paths, with responsible camping a high priority. Cllr Gordon Adam said: “In less than four months, over 60,000 vehicles were recorded in car parks and on roadsides over the summer weekends, with over 35,000 people observed by the team, just under half of whom were informed or reminded of responsible behaviour by the access ranger team." more

Airbnb has created an anti-party system blocking around 50,000 bookings of those under 25 years old and with less than three positive opinions. Since August 2020 they have blocked  50,000 people from booking with Airbnb in Spain and 375,000 across Europe. The anti-party system came about “to prevent irresponsible behaviour and reduce unauthorised parties in accommodation in some countries in Europe” and also operates in the US & Canada. “Airbnb is committed to ensuring that communities can enjoy the positive benefits of responsible tourism, and these measures are helping to eliminate the kind of behaviour that has absolutely no place on Airbnb.” more  & more
Airbnb has announced that it is launching a six-month noise detector pilot programme for hosts and that it will provide guests with a dedicated ‘Good Neighbour Guide’ for visits to Prague. Airbnb’s pilot programme enables hosts use to a noise monitoring sensor to detect, solve noise and nuisance concerns in their listing, and to help guests travel responsibly in local neighbourhoods.  The Mayor of Prague has sought to limit Airbnb’s presence and combat perceived ‘overtourism’. In February he told The Observer that he wanted to “give Prague back to the people of Prague.” “In the past, you could limit the amount of tourists in the city simply by approving a certain number of hotels of certain capacity during the process of building permits. Now in Prague, there is no possibility for the city to limit the accommodation capacity for tourists.” Pre-Covid, it was revealed that the number of listings on the site in Prague had jumped from 5,537 to over 13,000 in two years, and some local residents had complained about increased noise disturbances and soaring rental costs.


5. Child Exploitation Resumes
Mama Fatima Singhateh, UN Special Rapporteur on the sale and sexual exploitation of children has warned that the unprecedented socio-economic crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated existing stark inequalities and the vulnerabilities of the most disadvantaged children, thereby amplifying the risks of exposing them to sale, sexual and labour exploitation in the context of hospitality and travel and tourism industry, both online and offline. "Everyone has a role to play in preventing exploitation of children in travel and tourism, companies, including in the hospitality and entertainment industry, must conduct human rights due diligence and provide employees with regular training on sexual exploitation of children and adopt obligatory reporting of suspected cases. more


6. Dcarbonising Travel & Tourism
Biden’s Energy Secretary, Jennifer Granholm, has recently announced a plan to
ensure affordability of clean energies by decreasing costs, hoping to reduce the cost of hydrogen by 80% by 2030, from around $5/kg today to $1/kg by 2030. more  & more 
For Dcarbonise Week WTM Responsible Tourism organised panels on decarbonising aviation, accommodation and tour operating These panels will be available on-demand at WTM, London.  The programme is available here.

On 23 September British Airways operated its first carbon-neutral passenger flight from London to Glasgow. British Airways has made changes to the Airbus A320neo, including installing newer, lighter seats on the new aircraft, lighter catering trollies and has replaced heavy flight manuals and inflight magazines with digital downloads, all helping to reduce the weight of the aircraft, contributing to lower fuel use and lower emissions. This was showcase flight, with co-operation from air traffic control to assure a continuous climb from Heathrow and descent into Glasgow, avoiding any levelling off, which causes an increase in fuel burn. The flight emitted 62% less than a comparable flight in 2010. 34% of the improvement was attributed by BA to more efficient aircraft and operations, 28% from SAF and 38% from offsetting using high quality, verified carbon offsets. more

According to an analysis by experts from environmental NGOs International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT), ODI and Transport and Environment (T&E), 27% of total emissions are provided by just 20 airports. Dubai 16.m tonnes, London Heathrow 16.2m; Los Angeles International 12.9m more

The Airport Tracker also provides data by airport and country. So for the UK

Jet2.com reports that from 2011 to 2020 they improved efficiency by more than 19%, averaging 2.4% a year; substantially ahead of ICAO’s global annual average fuel efficiency goal of 2% until 2020, when the pandemic caused emissions in  gCO2 per passenger kilometre to rise to a level above where they were in 2011. Jet2.com’s “efficient flying” programme focused on all aspects of the airline’s operations including single-engine taxi operations; pre-conditioned air; careful fuel requirement planning; performance-based navigation approaches; reduced thrust takeoffs and continuous descents; and using electric ramp vehicles and fixed electrical ground power where available, combined with ongoing weight-saving initiatives from lightweight seats, lighter catering carts, the removal of paper manuals and the introduction of carbon brakes.
Steve Heapy, chief executive of Jet2holidays and Jet2.com told Travel Weekly that Jet2  is incorporating the price of carbon-offsets into its fares, adding the equivalent cost of a cup of coffee to each flight.


7. Climate Change
To avoid the worst impacts of hotter conditions, the July IPCC Report concluded that global carbon emissions needed to be cut by 45% by 2030 for a 1.5°C rise and 25% for a 2°C rise. In preparation for COP26 the UNFCCC has reported on the latest NDCs: "The available NDCs of all 191 Parties taken together imply a sizable increase in global GHG emissions in 2030 compared to 2010, of about 16%. This could eventually lead to a temperature rise of 2.7C (4.9F) above pre-industrial times. 

The impact of climate change is uneven and grossly unfair. The World Economic Forum reported one of those cases on 3rd September. "Madagascar is suffering from famine caused by climate change, in spite of only contributing 0.01% of all the carbon dioxide generated from 1933-2019... The famine, caused by a devastating, four-year drought, is placing at least 30,000 people in the most extreme stage of food insecurity: a level five famine, as defined by the World Food Programme (WFP). At least 1.1 million are in some kind of severe food insecurity.." more
Analysis by the BBC has revealed that the number of extremely hot days every year when the temperature reaches 50C has doubled since the 1980. The total number of days above 50C (122F) has increased in each decade since 1980. On average, between 1980 and 2009, temperatures passed 50C about 14 days a year. The number rose to 26 days a year between 2010 and 2019. In the same period, temperatures of 45C and above occurred on average an extra two weeks a year. These increases have not been felt equally around the world: Eastern Europe, southern Africa and Brazil saw some maximum temperatures rise by more than 1C, and parts of the Arctic and Middle East recorded increases of more than 2C. This year saw record temperatures: 48.8C in Italy and 49.6C in Canada
Climate change: IPCC report is 'code red for humanity'


8. easyJet
On 27th September easyJet launched its "inaugural sustainability strategy led by its vision for “a world where travel makes a positive impact on the environment and local communities”
They describe their mission: "When it comes to sustainability we want to raise the bar, positively shake things up and lead the industry. To make sustainability part of our everyday culture, enabling us, our partners, and you to reduce your footprint, and make a positive impact on the people and places that make our destinations so special." They are seeking to scale up sustainable travel and make it available to everyone. They recognise that carbon offsetting is an interim measure and they have taken a range of measures to reduce fuel consumption before offsetting. more   There are three core pillars – create better holiday choices making sustainable travel affordable and accessible to everyone; keep our holidays special which is maximising the benefits and minimising the negative impacts of travel and tourism, and transform travel for everyone embedding sustainability into business decisions and behaviours and driving meaningful change in the industry. more
Carbon emissions reduction and offsetting: In May easyJet became "the first major tour operator to offset the carbon emissions from its package holidays – comprising the fuel used for flights and in-destination transfers, as well as the energy used from hotel stays". They reported that "Since 2000, the airline has cut its carbon emissions per passenger, per kilometre by a third. While easyJet believes that offsetting is the best way to address its carbon emissions right now, it is only an interim measure until radical new technologies are available and easyJet is actively involved in the development of all-electric, hybrid and hydrogen propulsion to achieve zero-emission flying in the future." They are "carbon offsetting through schemes accredited by two of the highest verification standards, Gold Standard and VCS. They will include forestry, renewable and community-based projects." more


9. Covid

The 56-day trend graph is turning down, but the situation varies by country and there may yet be a new variant.

Covid-19 is continuing to spread around the world, with around 237 million confirmed cases and more than 4.8 million deaths across almost 200 countries.

The US, India and Brazil have seen the highest number of confirmed cases, followed by the UK, Russia and Turkey.

Much more detailed information is available here including a map showing the distribution of pandemic and current incidence by region and country.

 


10. Miscellany
WTM LAT:
There were panels in Spanish and Portuguese at WTM Latin America on community-based tourism, Afro-tourism, regenerative tourism, and the WTM  Responsible Tourism Awards. These panels are now available online.
How to Talk About Waste in Tourism
"Reframing “waste” so that people see value and opportunity instead of garbage helps them conceptualize this deeply held belief in a new way." more on Rooted Storytelling

The Vatican says on World Tourism Day that tourism needs to protect both people and the planet as well as promote a more inclusive economy, "and resist the temptations of individualism and nationalism that are too common in our contemporary society." more
Accor joins global sustainability network, the Sustainable Hospitality Alliance
Google joins the Travalyst Coalition
Documentary: The Last Tourist, Tourism has lost its way Trailer 
VisitBritain on sustainability 
Trafalgar and Costsaver
make responsible tourism excursion pledge committing to offer at least one ‘Make Travel Matter Experience’ on each tour by 2023. They are part of  The Travel Corporation which expects them to have a ‘Make Travel Matter Experience’ on  50% of all our itineraries by 2025. Trafalgar and Costsaver are planning on 100% by 2023.

 


The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD

WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

 

RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 08/ 2021

  1. Aviation Needs to Adapt to Climate Change and Abandon Fossil Fuels
  2. Climate Change is Going to Disrupt Travel & Tourism
  3. Covid Continues to Disrupt Travel & Tourism 
  4. Human Rights 
  5. Measuring Food Waste
  6. Tackling Overtourism 
  7. Responsible Tourism in China
  8. Tourism Disturbs Wildlife 
  9. València is tackling the Water Issue
  10. Miscellany

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
2021 RT Events
October 8 WTM Decarbonising Travel & Tourism
October 14 Cornwall  Sustainable Tourism Symposium
November 1-3 WTM London

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of September
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

1. Aviation Needs to Adapt to Climate Change and Abandon Fossil Fuels

International Aviation Policy Consultant, Chris Lyle, has just published "Code red for aviation: Scoping and reducing the sector’s contribution to climate change"
Chris Lyle argues that " Quantum changes in emissions mitigation governance and measures are essential..." and that "Air transport’s climate-harming emissions have grown substantially from year to year over decades and, with the exception of 2020, they are likely to continue to do so in the absence of intensive and focused action to wean the sector away from its dependence on fossil fuels and towards making its requisite contribution to the climate imperative." "This “white” paper, out for comment and debate, proposes a package of requisite actions by the UNFCCC (starting at COP26 in November), the International Civil Aviation Organization, regulatory authorities, industry (air transport, tourism and trade), travelers and shippers."  Chris Lyle has set out a comprehensive agenda for substantial change. 

It is important to look beyond the silo of travel and tourism to see what is happening in other sectors. In Sweden, the first fossil-free steel has been delivered to Volvo for truck manufacture. Fossil-free steel will be roughly 20-30% more expensive than steel made with fossil fuels, but the price is expected to fall to competitive levels eventually thanks to external factors, such as environmental regulations. Jan Moström, CEO of LKAB, the government-owned mining company declared "It is a crucial milestone and an important step towards the creation of a completely fossil-free value chain from mine to finished steel. We have now shown that it is possible, and the journey continues". more  Full commercial production is expected in 2026 replacing coking coal, traditionally needed for ore-based steel making, with fossil-free electricity and hydrogen. H2 Green Steel, is planning to build a fossil fuel-free steel plant in the north of Sweden, including a sustainable hydrogen facility, with production starting in 2024. more

Griffith Institute for Tourism and Griffith Aviation is hosting a series of webinars exploring research, innovation and good practice that is underway in the aviation sector with regards to new fuels and the transition to a low-carbon economy. Access them here. 

The UK government has launched a consultation on its plans to deliver 5GW of hydrogen production capacity by 2030, estimating that the industry could be worth £900m and support more than 9,000 jobs by the same date. The government is proposing subsidies for the hydrogen industry along the lines of those credited with driving down the cost of offshore wind power. Ministers are proposing to support both blue and green hydrogen production. Many environmentalists have doubts about blue hydrogen which is made using fossil fuels, but its environmental impact can be mitigated by capturing and storing greenhouse emissions underground.
Jess Ralston from the Energy and Climate Intelligence Unit,  sees hydrogen as part of the future of aviation "I think you'll see changes to aviation by 2050, you'll see sustainable fuels and hydrogen, you'll see electric planes for shorter journeys." In England in 2018, just 10% of people who flew frequently were responsible for more than half of all international flights. Just under half the population didn't take a single flight that year. More 
The UK's  Department for Transport says it is working with the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) on the benefits of “mandating the provision of environmental information to customers” to enable consumers to purchase less polluting flights  It points to research from the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) which suggests that the least polluting flights emit 63 per cent less CO2 than the worst. more
In Scotland Loganair and the University of Strathclyde have partnered Rolls-Royce and the Centre for Modelling & Simulation (CFMS) for a project to develop more sustainable aeroplanes. The project aims to create an aircraft that is capable of short-haul operations across the Highlands and Islands.
A Boston-based start-up backed by some of Silicon Valley’s most prominent investors is betting on hybrid boat-planes to cross the east and west coasts of the United States (US) in an attempt to revolutionize the future of transportation infrastructure. The boat-planes designed by REGENT, will be all all-electric, a kind of boat-aircraft hybrid featuring a wing-in-ground effect and hydrofoil technologies.


2. Climate Change is Going to Disrupt Travel & Tourism

Droughts, wildfires and flooding will affect destinations, the travel and tourism industry moral and business reasons to press for developed country originating market support for significant reductions in emissions and financing for adaptation.  Extreme heat and wildfires in North America, Australia, Russia and Europe and storm damage and flooding reaching New York. Many perhaps saw climate change as a developing country problem. But 2020  was Europe's warmest on record, 1.9C above the long-term average, it was more than 0.5C greater than the previous high mark.
"The warmth across Europe brought huge temperature differences from the long-term average in some countries with Estonia, Finland and Latvia all recording anomalies of 2.4C. ... "The Arctic, we see warming incredibly rapidly. It was the warmest average surface temperature in the Arctic in a series going back 121 years, in 2020," more
Matthew Paterson, a professor of international politics at the University of Manchester, argues that reaching peak emissions and then rapidly declining four years from now. shouldn’t technically be too difficult In energy, transport and housing, there are numerous alternatives to coal-fired power plants, petrol-fuelled cars and gas boilers that could be deployed at sufficient scale starting tomorrow.  Pearson points to a number of political factors which make this unlikely: the distraction of Covid; the political power of the fossil fuel industries and the unwillingness of governments to regulate and invest to increase the pace of change. 
The World Meteorological Organization has published a new atlas charting the scale of extreme weather events and revealing the disproportionate impacts that tropical cyclones have on disaster statistics as well as on developing countries.
The Maldives is the world's lowest-lying country and Mr Nasheed, President of Maldives 2008-12, has said the projections by UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) would be "devastating" for the nation, putting it on the "edge of extinction". more  Sonam Wangdi, chair of the UN's Least Developed Countries (LDC) Group on climate change has said  "We need to adapt our plans to the worsening climate crisis Our existing plans are not enough to protect our people."  In 2020 the Caribbean had a record-breaking 30 tropical storms - including six major hurricanes. On islands like Antigua and Barbuda, experts say that many buildings have been unable to withstand the intense winds these storms have brought. "We used to see category four hurricanes, so that's what we have prepared for with our adaptation plans, but now we are being hit by category five hurricanes," says Diann Black Layner, chief climate negotiator for the Alliance of Small Island States. Several Pacific Island countries were hit by three cyclones between the middle of 2020 and January 2021. In Uganda, communities in the Rwenzori region have been trying to protect themselves from landslides and floods by digging trenches and planting trees, helping to prevent soil erosion. more
Wildfires destroy destinations and it takes years for the forest to grow back. "The wildfires in Turkey have been labelled 'the worst in its history by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Greece has also seen record-breaking wildfires - with 12 times as much land being burned than average. Much of this destruction has been caused by wildfires on the Greek island of Evia, with more than 2,000 people being evacuated by sea. This fire season has seen smoke from Siberia reach the North Pole for the first time in recorded history." more Severe flash flooding hit Turkey’s Black Sea region to the north of the country 17 people reportedly died, with more than 1,400 people evacuated from the areas affected. Thousands were evacuated, including tourists from campsites, as wildfires in southern France consumed 6,000 ha.  In Europe Greece, Turkey, Spain and Portugal are among the countries that have been grappling with wildfires that have claimed lives and destroyed homes. more

Naomi Oreskes, a historian of science at Harvard University, co-author of Merchants of Doubt, writes about the inherent “conservatism” of physical climate science and economics "The scientific conception of rationality as sitting in opposition to emotion, leads many scientists to feel that it is important for them to be ‘sober,’ dispassionate, unemotional, and ‘conservative.’ This often leads them to be uncomfortable with dramatic findings, even when they are true.” The economic impact of climate change is also under costed: economists "tended to be over-confident about the power of markets, and reluctant to acknowledge market failure on the grand scale.” more
In 2004, when researchers discovered that more than half of articles on climate change treated dissenting opinions as equally valid. Research just published reports that that 90% of media coverage accurately represented the scientific consensus that human activity is driving global warming, looking at thousands of articles from 2005 to 2019. more


3. Covid Continues to Disrupt Travel & Tourism
Covid is going to be with us permanently. We need to get used to Covid circulating. Experts have been clear we should expect to be infected repeatedly over our lifetimes. more  Israel has among the world’s highest levels of vaccination for COVID-19, with 78% of those 12 and older fully vaccinated, the vast majority with the Pfizer vaccine. Yet the country is now logging one of the world’s highest infection rates, with nearly 650 new cases daily per million people. More than half are in fully vaccinated people, underscoring the extraordinary transmissibility of the Delta variant and stoking concerns that the benefits of vaccination ebb over time. Science
Our sector is going to have to learn to live with travel disruption caused by climate change and Covid. Dr. Mareba Marissia Scott asks "Are You Vaccinated but Travel Hesitant?"  She writes " Given the recent UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on the dire situation with the increased anthropogenic heating of the earth's atmosphere, I feel no guilt about my travel hesitancy. I feel as though I  am doing my part to reduce carbon emissions, but I fear if there are too many persons like me, what will that mean for tourism's recovery, especially in tourism-dependent economies such as those in the Caribbean? " Adaptation will be painful but adapt we must.
There are moral and business reasons to campaign for vaccination equity. James Thornton, CEO of Intrepid Travel, published an open letter on August 4th arguing that for travel to return global vaccine equity is required. As James points out “less than 1% of vaccines have been delivered to low-income countries. But vaccines for the privileged simply won’t cut it. Billions of lives are still at risk.” Intrepid has launched “a global vaccine equity campaign, which focuses on three key actions: a commitment to raise AUD $100,000 via The Intrepid Foundation to support the global delivery of COVID-19 vaccines, improving vaccine access and education by mobilising our on-the-ground networks, and the introduction of a mandatory vaccine policy on our trips.”
In Kerala the State government will establish a revolving fund for disbursing interest-free loans to help out people dependent on the tourism sector who have been affected by pandemic-induced financial crisis.  New Zealand has announced that its borders are to remain closed for the rest of the year., but from early 2022  New Zealand will move to a new individual risk-based model for quarantine-free travel.


4. Human Rights
Once a year, the Roundtable Human Rights in Tourism organises an international symposium with a wide range of stakeholders from the tourism industry. This year, the event will take place online on 22 September 2021, titled: " From Obligation to Aspiration: Supply Chain Laws and the Business Case of Putting People first ".
The event will consist of experts input and a short impulse talk, a panel discussion on current developments in supply chain legislation, its impacts and benefits for tourism stakeholders, and various inputs on specific human rights risk areas.22 SEPTEMBER 2021, 10:00 AM - 01:45 PM CEST ONLINE via ZOOM   Symposium Details  Register


5. Measuring Food Waste
WWF and Greenview have worked with Accor, Hilton, Hyatt, IHG Hotels & Resorts, and Marriott International to develop a standardised methodology for the hotel industry to collect data, and measure and report waste. This methodology creates a consistent way for both chains and individual properties to set meaningful goals to reduce waste, keep it out of landfills, and track progress against those goals over time.  As Madhu Rajesh, CEO of the Sustainable Hospitality Alliance has pointed out. “The Hotel Waste Measurement Methodology is a valuable addition to an expanding suite of industry measurement methodologies including our HCMI and HWMI. By coming together as an industry, and sharing expertise, we can develop resources that are designed for the industry context, and support every hotel to manage and improve their impact — wherever they are on their sustainability journey.”  more . Download the methodology.


6. Tackling Overtourism
 La Stampa has reported that from summer 2022 Venice will start charging travellers to visit. Visitors who have paid are expected to enter the city via Disneyland-style electronic turnstiles. The proposed fee will vary seasonally between €3 and €10, residents, their relatives and children under six will be exempt. People “staying in local hotels” are also likely to be exempt, more.
Airbnb
opened its Office of Healthy Tourism some three years ago intended to expand Airbnb’s efforts to economically empower communities, drive travel to lesser-known places, and support environmentally-friendly travel habits. Airbnb has partnered with UNESCO recognising that ", tourism must be part of the economic recovery and community inclusion in Mexico.... “Consequently, this alliance seeks to set the foundations for co-responsible and sustainable tourism that contributes to local economic development, community inclusion, and biodiversity protection in destinations so that this initiative can be replicated across the country and Latin America.” The initiative is being tested in Mexico City and the Yucatan Peninsula.  more  Costa Rica by Land. With WWF Mesoamérica, the Costa Rican Chamber of Restaurants (CACORE) and the National Chef’s Association (ANCH), Airbnb has launched two road trip routes aimed at domestic travellers: Surf and Volcanoes and Valleys. more  & more
In Wales Snowdon has been hit again this year by long queues of people at the summit. watch the BBC video


7. Responsible Tourism in China
For the first time,  this year we have entries from China in WTM Global Responsible Tourism Awards. The China Biodiversity Conservation and Green Development Foundation, CBCGDF, a leading national non-profit public foundation and a social legal entity dedicated to biodiversity conservation and green development, has established an ICRT, China with Harold Goodwin as its Director. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Georg Arlt FRGS FRAS & CEO COTRI China Outbound Tourism Research Institute has been appointed Associate Director.  RT now has a powerful Foundation to work with and RT is now being promoted in Chinese: What is responsible tourism? ¦  What does responsible mean? ¦ The Cape Town Declaration ¦ The Platform for Change
The ICRT, China has organised its first event which takes place this month, view this presentation 
This year's International Coastal Cleanup Day falls on September 18, which coincides with China's traditional Mid-Autumn Festival and is a working day before the short holiday. Given this, CBCGDF has planned a public welfare activity to collect garbage from underwater, land, coastal, river and lake shoreline areas together with volunteers around the world.  The cleanup will be combined with garbage classification, and all participating partners are invited to classify and weigh the garbage according to the following four categories, Recycling, Kitchen Waste, Hazardous Waste, other Rubbish.  If you undertake a coastal clean up please send details to us. 


8. Tourism, Wildlife & Protected Areas
Tourism needs to get Nature Positive. UNESCO and the German Federal Agency for Nature Conservation (BfN) put forward a standard methodology for evaluating the impact of protected areas on the local economy. "Once managers understand the number and behaviour of visitors they host, and the revenues and costs they generate, informed decisions on management plans and tourism strategies can be made." more
Stephen Sackur on HARDtalk speaks to Paula Kahumbu, CEO for WildlifeDirect, Kenya. Her campaign to protect elephants and other endangered species asks Kenyans to prioritise the protection of the country’s wild spaces – is it working? listen 
The China Biodiversity Conservation and Green Development Foundation (CBCGDF) co-hosted "'Elephants - from conflict to coexistence.' more
Seals are being put at risk of death and starvation by tourists disturbing them for selfies and pictures to put on social media, police and charities say.  more


9. València is tackling the Water Issue
València has committed to be a carbon-neutral destination by 2025.  The city's water company Global Omnium,  with the Visit Valencia Foundation and the city council, measured the sources and environmental impact of greenhouse gas emissions in 2019 including travel to Valencia, transport around the city, accommodation, restaurants, shopping, leisure activities, water management, waste treatment and tourism infrastructure. They found that 81% of tourism's carbon footprint came from travel to the city, by plane, train and cruise ships. more  The  research has been extended to cover water revealing that the water footprint of a tourist is  0.315 cubic metres per tourist per day. The calculation includes cruise passengers and those who simply visit the city on an excursion. "Only 16% of the total corresponds to water directly consumed by tourists, mainly in tourist accommodation, while 84% is indirect consumption associated with the production of goods and services, or food processing. This predominantly includes meals that visitors consume in the city’s restaurants, store purchases and the maintenance of attractions and entertainment venues. The use of transport (both public transport and car rental) makes up only 0.10% of tourism’s water footprint."  more


10. Miscellany

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD

WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

 

RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 07/ 2021

  1. Climate Change: now we need to mitigate and adapt
  2. Biodiversity 
  3. Travelling  in a Covid World 
  4. Ethical Employment 
  5. Developments in Aviation 
  6. Diversity Matters
  7. Why RT Awards Matter
  8. Better Tourism - Better Holidays 
  9. Local Economic Development through tourism
  10. Miscellany

Apply & Nominate here.

2021 RT Events
October 8 WTM Decarbonising Travel & Tourism
October 14 Cornwall  Sustainable Tourism Symposium
November 1-3 WTM London


The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of September
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

  1. Climate Change: now we need to mitigate and adapt
    Wildfires in Greece have reached Athens fuelled by high temperatures and drought, in Turkey tourists have been evacuated alongside locals and in Italy, hundreds have been evacuated from hotels, campsites and homes across the Italian city of Campomarino Lodi, in the region of Molise. Sicily has declared a state of emergency to last six months as fires burn through the island.
    Emissions from our burning of fossil fuels have raised average temperatures by 1.2°C, additional energy in the atmosphere results in longer hotter heatwaves and heat domes, more persistent droughts, more wildfires and more extreme rainfall events. The failure of our species to tackle greenhouse gas emissions has proven expensive and deadly.  The science is explained here.  It is no longer enough to talk about mitigation – we need to begin to invest in adaptation. The crisis is upon us. It is time to adapt to climate change. Climate change is a business risk for our sector with flooding and storms destroying destinations and people fleeing the heat, seasonability is changing. And further global warming is baked in. We have not yet even slowed the rate of growth let alone begun to reverse it. The IPCC Report released this week is very soberingHeat can be deadly. "High temperatures prompt the human body to produce sweat, which cools the skin as it evaporates. But when sky-high humidity is also involved, evaporation slows down and eventually stops. That point comes when the so-called the wet-bulb temperature—a measure that combines air temperature and humidity—reaches 35 degrees Celsius (95 degrees Fahrenheit)."  Scientific American

    Having failed to mitigate we must now also adapt to climate change


     

  2. Biodiversity
    Nature positive travel  Tourism businesses are being asked to join the journey towards the new global goal for nature (the equivalent of net-zero for carbon), which is to be nature positive by 2030.  Metrics for this goal will be available next year, but in the meantime, travel companies are being asked to act now and signal their support for nature - those that do will be featured on nature day at the COP 26 climate summit in Glasgow.    Justin Francis from Responsible Travel and the UK's Council for Sustainable Business have created a Nature Handbook for Business, where you can read 25 key actions that the travel industry can take and sign up for the journey to nature positive 2030.
    The UN has set out a Paris-style plan to cut the species extinction rate by a factor of 10. The text is to be agreed in Kunming at the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), COP 15 in October. Goals for the middle of the century include reducing the current rate of extinctions by 90%, enhancing the integrity of all ecosystems, valuing nature’s contribution to humanity and providing the financial resources to achieve the vision. more
     


     

  3. Travelling  in a Covid World
    As the WHO repeatedly reminds us none of us is safe until all are safe. Covid is far from over. Current data is available here   The US, India and Brazil have seen the highest number of confirmed cases, followed by Russia, France, the UK and Turkey. Very few places have been left untouched. Variants of concern continue to emerge. There is a complex patchwork of open and closed borders, test and quarantine requirements which are often expensive, confusing and subject to change at short notice. And there is always the risk of being required to self-isolate abroad
    In Uttarakhand after photographs and video of tourists flouting Covid norms in Kempty Falls, Mussoorie and Nainital went viral on social media platforms. The authorities asked over 5,000 tourists to turn back from Nainital city due to lack of parking space and tourists' failure to provide valid RT-PCR negative reports and the administration has now decided to completely prohibit the entry of two-wheelers into the main city on the weekends.
    In the UK an independent survey of the travel & tourism industry found that 68.4% of respondents believe that there will be a shortage of workers and 58.1% say they aren’t considering returning when the industry is fully operational 42.1% also said they knew of colleagues who have decided to leave the sector since the onset of COVID-19. 


     

  4. Ethical Employment
    In August 2020 Qatar's Ministry of Administrative Development, Labour and Social Affairs introduced a non-discriminatory minimum wage and removing the No-Objection Certificate requirement to change jobs for employees. ILO
    The Sustainable Hospitality Alliance estimates that 10% of private-sector forced labour occurs in accommodation and food serves, some 1.6m people. "Recruiting across borders enables hotels to find the talent and skills needed and fill gaps in the local labour market.  Recruitment processes and workers’ journeys differ. All of them may present risks to workers, especially when recruitment is done without due diligence throughout the recruitment and migration process."
    This initiative brings together recruitment agencies in countries of origin, hotel companies in countries of destination, and local governments to:
    i) Support recruitment agencies in adopting ethical recruitment practices
    ii) Raise awareness and increase commitment across the sector
    iii) Develop hospitality-specific training and tools on implementing ethical recruitment
    iv) Create guidance for hotel companies operating in countries of destination
    v) Improve access to information for hotel workers throughout their recruitment journey. In July this year the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Sustainable Hospitality Alliance with support from the US Department of State’s Bureau for Population, Refugees and Migration,  launched a multi-year partnership to promote ethical recruitment and the protection of migrant workers in the tourism industry. This partnership will leverage the multi-stakeholder model of the IOM’s IRIS: Ethical Recruitment initiative to promote regular pathways for migrant workers and protect them throughout the labour migration process. It will target key migration corridors in the Latin America region as well as between East Africa and select States of the Gulf Cooperation Council.
    The Sustainable Hospitality Alliance seeks to promote the human rights of workers in the hospitality industry. It works with the industry and other partners to raise awareness of human rights risks, embed human rights into corporate governance, and address risks arising in the labour supply chain. This includes working to unite the industry behind a set of Principles on Forced Labour. It also provides free tools and training to support the industry to recognise and mitigate human rights risks. more


  5. Developments in Aviation
    The EU has reported favourably on sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) in its ReFuelEU Aviation strategy document.  However, further doubt has been thrown on the aviation sector's SAF strategy by a recent report from the ICCT which concluded that "even with some incentives and targeted support in place, SAF production covers less than 0.05% of global jet fuel demand. While producing SAF from waste oils is the most technically mature SAF conversion pathway, waste oils are highly resource-constrained and are already largely consumed by the road sector. High near-term targets for SAF blending may only incentivize the diversion of waste oils from existing uses in the road sector, approaching approximately 2% of 2030 jet fuel demand from waste oil alone."
    United plans to buy 15 new supersonic airliners and "return supersonic speeds to aviation" in  2029 which will run entirely on SAF, recognising that there is not enough biodiesel they plan to use power-to--liquid fuel (SAFe).
    Electric aircraft are growing in popularity, United Airlines plans to have them airborne by 2026. United Airlines has signed an agreement to acquire 100 of Heart Aerospace's ES-19 aircraft, a 19-seat electric airliner that has the potential to decarbonize regional air travel. Israel business Eviation Aircraft has a model aircraft that promises 1,000 km of flight time running exclusively on electricity, to be flown in the second half of 2021 and with planned service entry in 2024. The plane, Alice, is powered by a 900kWh lithium battery - more than 65% of the nine-seater plane, capable of flying 650 miles.


     

  6. Diversity Matters
    At WTM London last November there was a panel discussion about racism in tourism and a series of interviews about tourism and diversity
    There is a diversity category in WTM's Global Responsible Tourism Awards this year, closing on 31 August.  We are asking: How inclusive is our industry? We travel to experience other cultures, communities, and places. If everywhere was the same, why travel? Though we seek diversity through travel, we’ve noticed that diversity is not always reflected in the industry that helps others have such experiences. Diversity is a broad term: “identities include, but are not limited to, ability, age, ethnicity, gender identity and expression, immigration status, intellectual differences, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.” We do not expect to find an organisation that has made demonstrable progress on all of these in the last few years. For our industry, it is about who we employ at various levels, who we market to, the way we present the destinations we sell, the range of experiences we promote, and the stories we tell.Tariro Mzezewa is a travel reporter based in New York publishing regularly in the New York Times. She wrote in July about how tourists, particularly Black travellers, are paying close attention to how destinations and travel service providers approach diversity and equity after a year of social justice protests. As Tariro points out "as travel once again picks up, the question of how much travel has really changed has taken on new urgency. She reports that "many travelers are paying close attention to whether companies are following through with their promises from last year. Black travelers, in particular, are doubling down on supporting Black-owned businesses. A survey released earlier this year by the consulting firm MMGY Global found that Black travelers, particularly those in the United States, Canada, Britain and Ireland, are keenly interested in how destinations and travel service providers approach diversity and have indicated that it has an influence on their travel decision-making." more


     

  7. Why RT Awards Matter
    In the Global Responsible Tourism Awards, we are seeking to recognise those who are taking responsibility to use tourism to make the world a better place. We are looking to recognise those that have made a difference and to encourage others to try harder, to thrive and do good.  There is some sage advice, too often ignored: “don’t let the pursuit of the perfect drive out the good.” Too many businesses and destinations choose not to apply, having not yet become as good as they would like to be, carrying a substantial burden of guilt that they have not done even more – they are too modest and fail to recognise the importance of what they have achieved. Only those that enter can win.
    The Awards showcase best practices in the industry.  
    Applying for the Responsible Tourism Awards has real value – the process is for many as valuable as the recognition which comes with being a winner. Iain Harris of CoffeeBeansRoutes explains why they enter the Awards and the business benefits it brings to their business – don’t be put off by the hoodie, Cape Town was freezing when this video was recorded.

  8. Better Tourism - Better Holidays
    Increased domestic tourism has brought problems. Do tourists care about other people? Himachal Pradesh residents have suffered from ugly behaviour by some tourists refusing to distance or wear masks mandatory under Covid norms. In Manali four Punjabi youngsters stopped their vehicle in the middle of the road causing a traffic snarl, and when they were asked by some locals to reverse their vehicle they came out of their vehicles threatening people and brandishing swords.
    Finally, after many false dawns, UNESCO's threat to remove World Heritage Site status from Venice has resulted in a decision by the national government to ban vessels weighing more than 25,000 tonnes from the lagoon from 1 August. More & more  & more

Germany has launched a Feel Good campaign inviting tourists to Feel at home in Germany's nature. Discover more than 130 protected natural landscapes, high-quality cycling and hiking trails and more than 150 excellent health resorts and spas in Germany. All Deutsche Bahn trains are using 100% green electricity in Germany for long-distance transport and 10  sustainable travel tips including taking part in local life and purchasing souvenirs in local markets and in small individual shops..

VisitScotland has launched a protect, respect and enjoy responsibly campaign on domestic TV to run through the peak holiday season: ‘I love it so I look after it’ Caroline Warburton, VisitScotland regional leadership director, said: “The provision of tourism and events should not be solely focused on the needs of our visitors but should also have a positive impact on both communities and the environment. We have an opportunity to reset our plans based on a more responsible future where an increasing number of visitors want their holidays to make a positive contribution to the communities they are visiting.” A UNESCO National Trail in Scotland is planned, a new digital trail to connect 13 UNESCO designations in Scotland to enhance the economic and social well-being of their respective local areas through sustainable tourism encouraging visitors to stay longer and spend more locally, improving, in turn, the quality of life of those communities.
In Wales dangerously parked cars have been towed away by authorities in Snowdonia.

9. Local Economic Development through tourism
The V&A Waterfront in Cape Town has published its 5th bi-annual report chronicling its economic contributions to growing incomes and jobs, its contribution to GDP, the contribution of cruise and its work with start-ups to develop and grow enterprises. The Kerala Responsible Tourism Mission (RT Mission) has launched an agri-tourism hub scheme to ready 500 farm tourism and 5,000 homestead ventures across Kerala by March 2023 in the first phase of the project. Rupesh Kumar said, “Tourists and others who visit the farms will also be able to directly source the produce, thus laying the groundwork for the formation of a supply chain. The RT Mission will ready farm tourism packages in tandem with local bodies and also help market them." more   The Convention on Biological Diversity has just published "Making Money Local: Can Protected Areas Deliver Both Economic Benefits and Conservation Objectives?"


 

10. Miscellany
♦ peopleandplaces E-volunteering a positive response to Covid 19
♦ Holly Tuppen on How to plan a holiday that benefits everyone involved – including the planet
Table Mountain is inviting all learners to explore its Class in the Clouds enabling students and teachers to trade their classrooms for a fun day of interactive learning at the top of the mountain.
330 kilos of recycled waste converted into 'Calpe' sign installed at Arenal-Bol beach in the Marina Alta, Alicante province.
The Regeneration Collection has launched a competition to accelerate the development of regenerative properties & destinations around the world. An international event for undergraduates in  Hospitality, Conservation & Architecture to design accommodation to actively restore the local environment and its communities and create a unique guest experience.
Sustainable Hospitality Challenge (SHC) is a Hotelschool The Hague initiative that aims to enhance the evolution of sustainable hospitality.
♦ At Stonehenge, campaigners have won a court battle to prevent the "scandalous" construction of a road tunnel near Stonehenge.


Obituary
Roger Heape
was managing director of BA Holidays, and a prominent advocate of responsible tourism, which to him meant respect not just for the environment but for the economy of tourist regions and the legitimate rights of both native peoples and tourists themselves. He was instrumental in creating the Travel Foundation in 2003, and chaired it in 2008-09. more


The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD

WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM

RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 06/ 2021

  1. WTM Launches a "Platform for Change"
  2. Climate Change: time to adapt?
  3. Building back better 
  4. Decarbonising Aviation 
  5. New Responsible Tourism School Launched 
  6. The Regional Awards in the Global Responsible Tourism Awards
  7. Covid-19 is not going away
  8. Sustainable Hospitality Alliance 
  9. World Heritage in Danger 
  10. Miscellany

Apply & Nominate here.

The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of August
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

 


1.WTM Launches a "Platform for Change"

Booking.com’s latest global research suggests that we have reached a “potential watershed moment for industry and consumers”.  Their research shows that travellers and holidaymakers want to travel sustainably and look for businesses and destinations that take responsibility for providing them with those opportunities. 48% say they find it harder to make sustainable choices while on vacation than in their everyday life. We need to make it easier for them, for commercial and sustainability reasons. more

John Swarbrooke has written on the WTM Responsible Tourism blog about why sustainable tourism failed  The Responsible Tourism movement has since 2002 sought to encourage businesses and destinations to do tourism better and the  Responsible Tourism Awards (open for entries this year until August 31st) have since 2004 been recognising those who have developed tried and tested ways of making tourism more sustainable.  The Platform for Change has been launched to provoke discussion about the issues which need to be addressed and the solutions which been tried and tested. Since 2004 Responsible Tourism Awards have been presented at WTM London each year and now also at WTM Africa and WTM LAT. Over the last couple of decades, many solutions have been developed and tested. In this decade, there needs to be more replication in order to tackle the challenge of sustainability. The Covid-19 pandemic has reminded us of the importance of resilience. If you have solutions you wish to contribute please contact us.

One of the biggest challenges confronting our sector is aviation, it is for this reason that it is our first platform. Aviation emissions, both domestic (40%) and international (60%), are the Achilles’ heel of the tourism industry. Tour operators, tourism authorities, and destinations need to demand that air transport providers remove carbon and other climate-harming emissions, not just to claim green credentials but to assure the industry’s future. Aviation is responsible for about 2.4% of the world’s CO2 emissions and 3.5% of human-induced climate change when other greenhouse gases and contrails are accounted for. In March 2020, the respected German consultancy Roland Berger forecast that if other industries decarbonise in line with current projections, aviation could account for up to 24% of global emissions by 2050 unless there is a significant technological shift. Sustainable Aviation Fuels (SAF) are only a stopgap and carbon offsetting is beset with theoretical and practical difficulties, both designed to enable business as usual. The Platform presents the case for hydrogen and Airbus's initiative to decarbonise aviation.

Ubuntu matters in travel & tourism – WTM’s new Platform for Change will enable us to share solutions

Large companies are now taking leadership on the sustainability agenda - see for example this conversation  with Shannon Guihan, Chief TreadRight & Sustainability Officer, at The Travel Corporation, USA

2. Climate Change: time to adapt?
Three decades of climate mitigation and we haven't bent the global emissions curve. Forget the theory and the forecasts we continue to pump greenhouse gases into our atmosphere, the evidence is clear. We are making our Earth more inhospitable for us - and many other species. We shall not destroy the planet, we are just making it more difficult for us to live here. Take a look at the graph.  Many scientists and activists understandably argue that we should not be focused on adaptation, that we must stay focused on mitigation, reducing the severity, seriousness of climate change. Others argue, and young people in particular, that it is time to adapt to climate change. Clover Hogan in a 12 minute TEDxLondonWomen speaks powerfully about how young people are falling into despair while adults make sense of their situation through denial -someone else will fix it.  It is now time to face up to the question: Is it time to adapt to climate change?
The US Drought Monitor map released on July 1st reveals how extensive the issue is.  “Already, scientists have discovered that across Pakistan and throughout the Persian Gulf, regions have reached combinations of temperature and humidity that are literally beyond the human threshold of survivability. The term for this measure is “wet-bulb temperature… ”  Raymond, Matthews & Horton revealed in May 2020 in Science Advances the health and morbidity consequences of extreme humid heat and that occurrences have ”  more than doubled in frequency since 1979.” As temperatures reached  49.6C (121.3F) in Lytton, British Columbia, with a “Heat Dome” over the Pacific northwest President Biden has understood that the heatwave is tied to climate change and has announced a plan to update the country’s infrastructure network. more

On climate change, President Biden is clear about urgency. He has pointed out that  “… scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade – this is the decade we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis… the world beyond 1.5 degrees means more frequent and intense fires, floods, droughts, heatwaves and hurricanes – tearing through communities, ripping away lives and livelihoods, increasingly dire impacts to our public health…. We can’t resign ourselves to that future.  We have to take action, all of us.” Now we’ve seen the wildfires and other consequences for human health, other species and the environment in the Pacific northwest. It is no longer an academic debate about the science of climate change – the change is upon us and we need to adapt to it. The agenda for action is no longer only about mitigation, we have procrastinated for so long that we have now to mitigate and adapt. more

Meanwhile, the United Nations has announced that it has recognized a new record-high temperature of 18.3°C or 64.9°F set on the Antarctic continent last year,  set at Argentina's Esperanza base on February 06, 2020. more Warming is a global issue. George Monbiot has clinically, and with substantial evidence, laid bare the chasm between  the rhetoric and extravagant PR commitments, "higher targets appear to be a substitute for action." Having targets and policy objectives is not enough - we need to implement them. On 30 June Channel4 News in the UK reported "ExxonMobil’s lobbying war on climate change legislation"

3. Building back better

As our sector begins to emerge from the pandemic and learns to live with Covid a range of different responses is emerging, and of course, many places remain locked down.

In Amsterdam, the pandemic has acted as a catalyst, regulations have been used to prevent tourist souvenir shops from displacing those which serve residents, to prevent residential accommodation from being converted to holiday lets and to restrict the building of new hotels. more
  Barcelona has developed a free app for mobiles to receive real-time information about visitor numbers at Barcelona’s landmarks and cultural attractions. The best way to visit the city and avoid the queues and crowds! And they are promoting local shops, eco-friendly transport [sustainable mobility], and blue & green Barcelona/

Airbnb has been fined 8 million euros over unregistered Paris rentals for allowing over 1,000 listings to flout rules to register their rentals. more Florence has banned evening walks in the most popular nightlife areas for those who have been eating or drinking in the area and there have been calls street food stalls to be taxed. The ban will remain in place until the end of the pandemic. more   In the Hawaii Archipelago, Maui County Council has imposed a moratorium on building permits for new visitor accommodations in South and West Maui.

The Scottish Government and Road Safety Scotland have launched a campaign reminding UK drivers to plan ahead before embarking on their staycation in Scotland this summer.  In Scotland, the Scottish Tourism Emergency Response Group (STERG) is spending £5.8m  on improving infrastructure and creating jobs at a number of Scotland’s popular visitor destinations and nature hotspots, at least partly in response to the issues which have arisen during the pandemic from very large numbers of domestic tourists in areas ill-equipped to receive them.  more In Perthshire a civilian force of seven 'visitor rangers' now patrol Perthshire preventing the pressure of tourism spoiling the county's increasingly popular countryside, to promote responsible tourism and help prevent ‘dirty camping’.
The North Coast 500 billed as Scotland's answer to Route 66, the scenic 516-mile (830km) circuit was developed as a way of increasing visitor numbers to lesser-trodden corners of the Highlands and helping boost the economies of remote communities. Launched in 2015 the NC500 is estimated to be worth more than £22 million annually to the Scottish economy. Now it is too successful, ditches have been dug around Applecross in Wester Ross to stop motorhomes parking in environmentally sensitive places, the route is dividing the community. more
In Wales, Denbighshire is encouraging visitors to plan, prepare and pre-book to ensure a positive experience, coastal safety tips, and outdoor safety messages to ensure people have the right skills, knowledge and gear before venturing out. In Northern Ireland the Economy Minister has launched a new visitor pledge to encourage safe and responsible tourism. Visitors are asked to show their support by signing up to the pledge and committing to the three core guidelines: Take Care of Each Other, Take Care of the Land, and Take Care of Local Businesses. Director of Marketing at Tourism Northern Ireland Naomi Waite added: "The launch of the visitor pledge will help to boost consumer confidence by setting out simple steps that we can all take together to make a difference. Whether it is social distancing, cleaning up litter after enjoying the outdoors or shopping local, I encourage all residents to take the pledge to support local businesses and our local environment.

4. Decarbonising Aviation
The Canadian academic, science broadcaster and environmental activist David Suzuki has spoken out about the importance of reducing aviation emissions. "Phantom Credits": In May Greenpeace UK's journalism project Unearthed published an analysis of carbon offsetting projects used by major airlines using satellite analysis of tree cover loss conducted by McKenzie Intelligence Services suggesting that the schemes lack verification and questioning their carbon offsetting impact. There is more on doubts about carbon offsetting as a viable mitigation strategy here. Bristol Airport has announced that it will be the first net-zero UK airport with three key commitments to be a net-zero airfield, with net-zero buildings and operate a net-zero fleet of vehicles. [cf. Climate scientists: concept of net-zero is a dangerous trap]

Shell and Rolls-Royce had agreed to work together to  "expand and accelerate several existing areas of cooperation between the companies such as advancing the use of SAF. This includes Rolls-Royce’s new SAFinity service, for which Shell is the exclusive SAF supplier, and working together on demonstrating the use of 100% SAF as a full “drop-in” solution."  Shell’s Energy and Chemicals Park in Rhineland near Cologne has Europe’s largest Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) water electrolyser today began operations at, producing green hydrogen. The electrolyser was manufactured by ITM Power in Sheffield, UK, and includes parts made in Italy, Sweden, Spain and Germany. The European consortium backing the project consists of SINTEF (co-ordinator), Shell, ITM Power, Sphera and Element Energy. more

Alternatives to flying continue to be developed. A French start-up founded by Adrien Aumont and Romain Payet, the duo behind French crowdfunding website KissKissBankBank, has revealed plans for a new network of overnight services from Paris to 12 European destinations, including Edinburgh and Porto. Midnight Trains hopes to reinvent the overnight train experience completely by launching a "hotel on rails" that offers a greener alternative to flying as well as a more comfortable alternative to the basic night train services long associated with Europe. more The New York Post ran a feature on Responsible Travel's around the world tour, without flying.

HYDROGEN-POWERED AVIATION: PREPARING FOR TAKE-OFF  In Brussels a Technical Workshop “Hydrogen-powered aviation Research and Innovation” has developed a technical roadmap focused on demonstrating fuel cell-based propulsion for regional aircraft architectures, and hydrogen direct burn based propulsion for short-medium-range aircraft architectures. "The first phase (2022-mid 2025) would consist of maturing technology enablers (e.g. MW-scale fuel cells system, H2 storage) and design hydrogen propulsion and aircraft configurations. Following a maturity assessment and concept selection at halfway through  the programme (mid-2025), the second phase (mid 2025-2030) would consist of maturing technology enablers, and adapting, integrating and demonstrating in order to achieve ‘frozen’ hydrogen propulsion and aircraft configurations by end 2029." more

5 New Responsible Tourism School Launched
The School for Responsible Tourism is a hub where tourism business owners, destination managers and industry thought leaders can access up-to-date resources and training. Established by Sarah Habsburg, a graduate of the Responsible Tourism Masters, t
he School for Responsible Tourism will become a space filled with valuable, inspiring, and motivational online tourism courses that will support you in your quest to make a difference. By detecting where and how you can make change you begin to enhance your offer, generate increased customer satisfaction, and improve sales through authentic marketing. The Advisory Panel includes Harold Goodwin and John Swarbrooke.

6 The Regional Awards in the Global Responsible Tourism Awards
!Khwa ttu, the "embassy" of the San of southern Africa were recognised in the RT Awards, in the video they explain what it meant to them

2021 brings the launch of Global Awards for each category, selected from the Gold winners in each of the regions. There will be Gold and Silver awards in each of the four regions, and the judges’ may also identify “ones to watch”. The judges can only choose from amongst those that apply. You can nominate others or your own business, destination, or organisation on the awards page which also has details of the categories here. Closing date 31 August

Two winners of the Responsible Tourism Awards explain here why they entered and how it benefitted them. 



Those businesses, destinations and organisations which win Gold in the four regional awards in Africa, India, Latin America, and the Rest of the World will automatically be entered into the Global Awards. There will be regional panels of judges and the global judging will be done by a panel drawn from the regional panels. All the panels will be chaired by Harold Goodwin, WTM’s Responsible Tourism Advisor, to ensure that the same processes are followed rigorously in all panels.

There are regional awards pages for  India, and Latin America Portuguese & Spanish.

Everyone enters via the WTM's global hub where you will find an entry guide, and buttons to nominate businesses and destinations which you think should enter and a button to enter. 

7. Covid-19 is not going away
Uneven vaccination rates are creating a new economic divide. The World Bank's Ayhan Kose describes a “tale of two recoveries”.  "In the world’s poorest 29 economies (including 23 countries in sub-Saharan Africa), only 0.3% of the population has received even one dose of vaccine. This group’s growth prospects have deteriorated. Their combined gdp is set to grow by 2.9% this year (not 3.4% as forecast six months ago). That would be their second-worst performance in the past two decades. Their worst was last year." more
In America,  only around 30% of Mississippians and Alabamans are fully protected.

As the Economist points out "Delta, first spotted in India, is two to three times more infectious than the virus that came out of Wuhan. Cases spread so fast that hospitals can rapidly run out of beds and medical staff (and sometimes oxygen), even in places where 30% of people have had jabs. Today’s variants are spreading even among the vaccinated. No mutation has yet put a dent in the vaccines’ ability to prevent almost all severe disease and death. But the next one might."  Looking at the legacy The Economist quotes the work of Nicholas Christakis of Yale University. He "identifies three shifts: the collective threat prompts a growth in state power; the overturning of everyday life leads to a search for meaning; and the closeness of death which brings caution while the disease rages, spurs audacity when it has passed." "Very roughly, rich-country governments paid out 90 cents for every dollar of lost output." Coivd accelerated changes which we already underway before the pandemic; the digital revolution, the impact of climate change and the rise of China.   more

In the EU a vaccine passport system is up and running to enable people to travel. The Economist has created a normalcy index*, to June 24th 2021, pre-pandemic level=100. The index "now sits at 66, implying that only half of the disruption caused by covid-19 has been reversed.  "America is at 73, the EU 71, Australia 70 and Britain 62. Elsewhere, the range is wider. Both Hong Kong and New Zealand, the leaders at 96 and 88, enjoy nearly full normalcy." more  Post the G7 summit in Cornwall, seven-day case rates have risen rapidly for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, increasing from 4.9 per 100,000 people on 3 June to 130.6 per 100,000. Outbreaks among students, as well as the impact of people travelling to and from Cornwall during half term, are believed to have significantly contributed to the rise. more

The UNWTO reports that international tourist arrivals were down 83% in the first quarter of 2021 UNWTO has estimated GDP losses by country due to a pandemic-related reduction in tourism, those countries most dependent on international tourism are hardest hit. Turkey down 9.1%, Ecuador 9%, South Africa 8.1%, Ireland 5.9%, Switzerland 4.3%, South Korea 3.8%, Australia/New Zealand 3.7%, France and  UK 3.2%. more

8. Sustainable Hospitality Alliance
The SHA has published a water stewardship factsheet and identified the steps necessary for hotels to become good water stewards.  And a new training resource to support disadvantaged young people to build a better future. The resource is freely available to qualified organisations to tackle the global issue of youth unemployment and help more young people who face additional barriers to employment to start their career journeys.

9. World Heritage in Danger
The main purpose of UNESCO's World Heritage listing system is to ensure that sites on the list are respected and protected by national jurisdictions. Sites are placed on the World Heritage in Danger list  - there are presently 53 properties on the list including the Historic Centre of Vienna, the Old City of Jerusalem and its Walls, the Chan Chan Archaeological Zone,  Liverpool – Maritime Mercantile City, the Selous Game Reserve and Everglades National Park. Seven new sites may be added to the list including Venice, Budapest. Ohrid, and Stonehenge. more  The Great Barrier Reef is also threatened with being listed as in danger.

Lakshadweep is not a World Heritage Site but there is concern about tourism development in the Lakshadweep archipelago of 36 islands in the Arabian sea. The draft Lakshadweep Development Authority Regulation 2021. It provides for the development of townships as well as acquisition, alteration and transfer of landed properties owned by Lakshadweep residents. more

10. Miscellany

    1. Holly Tuppen has published a consumer article in inews :  How to plan a holiday that benefits everyone involved – including the planet
    2. A herd of 13 elephants born and raised in a Kent zoo are about to get on a plane to travel almost 4,500 miles to Kenya in order to reintroduce them to the wild in a first-of-its -kind operation.
    3. ResponsibleTravel's new trade collection features a thousand holidays spanning across more than 80 countries, giving agents access to a unique collection of global holidays, all screened for their commitment to responsible tourism.
    4. Manchester's Jewish Museum has just reopened following a £6 million redevelopment project. Katy Marks, director of Citizens Design Bureau, believes the reimagined museum“serves as an architectural expression of the idea that we have more in common than that which divides us and we’re excited to finally share the building with everyone”.
    5. TravelTomorrow is just one year old and now has around one million subscribers
    6.  Adrienne Harris has asked practitioners to write to her about how development agencies could improve their tourism practice
    7. World Female Ranger Day 
    8. Ideas.TED.Com has produced a catalogue of 12 climate change documentaries and series that will give you an up-close look — and some solutions
    9. The European Travel Commission has published a Sustainable Tourism Implementation: Framework and Toolkit

 

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM


RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 05/ 2021

  1. If not now, when?
  2. Addressing Overtourism 
  3. Madhya Pradesh Webinar on Regenerative Tourism 
  4. Living with Covid-19
  5. Biodiversity and Telling the Wrong Stories About Africa, WTM Africa 
  6. Inclusive Tourism: Growing the Local Economic Impact
  7. Progress in Aviation?
  8. Sustainable Hospitality Handbook Booking.com
  9. 100% Pure Future—New Zealand Tourism Renewed
  10. Miscellany

Apply & Nominate here.

The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of July
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.


  1. If not now, when?
    As US President Joe Biden asserted this is the “decisive decade” for tackling climate change. “Scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade – this is the decade we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis… The need for action is increasingly urgent. The longer we procrastinate the more damage we shall do and the greater the cost. more
    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) reported on 27 May that there is about a 40% chance of the annual average global temperature temporarily reaching 1.5°C above the pre-industrial level in at least one of the next five years – and these odds are increasing with time. WMO Secretary-General Prof. Petteri Taalas. “Increasing temperatures mean more melting ice, higher sea levels, more heatwaves and other extreme weather, and greater impacts on food security, health, the environment and sustainable development,” more
    An Inconvenient Truth: Net-zero is a dangerous trap the bath analogy works because even if we reduce the flow into the bath, the bath can still overflow. As long as emissions are added to our atmosphere faster than they are removed then concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere increase and climate change worsens.  Collectively the research scientists Dyke, Watson and Knorr have spent more than 80 years thinking about climate change.  "… the idea of net-zero has licensed a recklessly cavalier “burn now, pay later” approach which has seen carbon emissions continue to soar."
    WTM, as part of its forthcoming Platform for Change, has published Time for Effective Action to Remove Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation.
    The European Union has recognised that it now needs to adapt to Climate Change "setting out the pathway to prepare for the unavoidable impacts of climate change. While the EU does everything within its power to mitigate climate change, domestically and internationally, we must also get ready to face its unavoidable consequences. From deadly heatwaves and devastating droughts to decimated forests and coastlines eroded by rising sea levels, climate change is already taking its toll in Europe and worldwide."
  2. Addressing Overtourism
    Barcelona
    has launched a new app to enable visitors to avoid congestion, visitors and residents alike can access real-time information about how busy the tourist sites are and the availability of tickets. The new app aims to prevent congestion at tourist sites and offer alternatives to visitors. The Observatory of Tourism in Barcelona has published its report on the results of the Survey on the profile and habits of tourists visiting Destination Barcelona during 2020 Turisme de Barcelona launched its campaign “Barcelona like Never Before”, to reposition Barcelona with a story about the recovery and re-boot of the city after its closure.
    Geotourist
    has an app that enables you to present and explain your places to the world, their platform enables you to provide interpretation, disperse visitors away from honeypots, bring tourists to unknown places, celebrate local history and culture, wildlife and landscapes, and discover the studios of artists and artisan workshops. The only limits are your time and imagination.
    In Hawaii  there was a move to cut the tourism promotion budget, defeated by councillors arguing that “We want our tourists when they come to come and be pono [righteousness] and responsible tourists. And when we take away this money, we are not going to be able to articulate that message,” said Puna Councilwoman Ashley Kierkiewicz, citing recent examples of bad behavior, or cluelessness about dangers, from visitors at Waipio Valley and Four Miles park."
    In Tahoe Jesse Patterson, chief strategy officer with the League to Save Lake Tahoe says “People leaving litter or other things behind, crowding places that are already crowded, parking and traffic issues related to that which become safety issues when you’re on a highway, near a cliff or on a boat for the first time ever with a bunch of other people on boats for the first time ever.” A travel pledge has been launched: “Demonstrate mindful travel. Be fire safe. Become a steward of Lake Tahoe,”  Shared stewardship with residents and visitor alike taking responsibility. “Locals play just as much of a part in this,” notes Devin Middlebrook, Mayor Pro Tem of the city of South Lake Tahoe. “We are also recreating. We are also going out and driving our cars around the Tahoe Basin. It’s not a visitor’s problem. It’s an ‘everyone’ challenge that we’re all working to solve.”
  3. Madhya Pradesh Webinar on Regenerative Tourism
    Webinar Registration
  4. Living with Covid-19
    Global coronavirus cases continue to rise, deaths have also been rising, however official figures may not fully reflect the true number in many countries. As the World Health Organisation constantly reminds us, a global pandemic requires a world effort to end it – none of us will be safe until everyone is safe. There are still many destinations around the world reliant on tourism for nationally significant numbers of livelihoods and precious foreign exchange, which dare not open their borders. For the less developed countries learning to live with Covid is a major additional burden. Most of the world remains unvaccinated. The BBC has an interactive web page with graphics showing the continuing rise in cases and progress with vaccination.

    In an effort to take the nationalist politics out of the discussion of Covid-19. Maria Van Kerkhove, the WHO's Covid-19 technical lead has argued that "No country should be stigmatised for detecting and reporting variants, the UK Kent variant is now Alpha, the South African variant is Beta, the Brazil variant, Gamma and the India variant Delta. full list
    None of the transition to living with Covid-19 is going to be easy. There are reports in the mainstream press of more than 1,200 vendors operating in the UK and worldwide, offering false documents for as little as £25. more  Border staff ‘catching 100 fake Covid certificates a day’ at UK border. more  People thinking about travelling internationally need to answer at least six questions: 1) Am I fully vaccinated? 2)  What are the local entry requirements? 3) Can I visit the attractions I want to see? 4) What’s the current COVID situation at my destination?  5) Where will I get a COVID test? 6) Can I quarantine after returning? 7) Can I afford the cost and time to quarantine? 8) Where should I sit on the plane? 9) Can I get adequate insurance? Caroline Bologna has asked whether it is ethical to travel internationally before the world is vaccinated? 
    The UNWTO has published a series of Inclusive Recovery Guide – Sociocultural Impacts of Covid-19,  I: Persons with Disabilities; 2  Cultural Tourism 3: Women in tourism 4: Indigenous Communities  download them here 
  5. Biodiversity and Telling the Wrong Stories About Africa, WTM Africa
    Tourism and Biodiversity: Friend or Foe?
      Africa is still blessed with much of the world’s charismatic megafauna, the Big 5 and a host of other species which tourists will pay top dollar to see. There can be no doubt that at least some of Africa’s biodiversity is highly valued. Too highly valued perhaps. Some species are worth more dead than alive as trophies, for decoration or “medicine”. As Shaun Vorster pointed out “When it comes to protecting our biodiversity, it is not about zero impact. It has to be about mitigating negative impact and making a positive impact in communities, be it economic, social or ecological.”
    We tell the wrong stories about Africa. We are a storytelling species. Storytelling matters; it creates meaningful connections, we need to do it better. We need to have more diversity in the experiences and stories we tell. Only through storytelling can we realise the ambition of Responsible Tourism to provide “more enjoyable experiences for tourists through more meaningful connections with local people, and a greater understanding of local cultural, social and environmental issues.”We need to think about the stories we tell in the itineraries and places we recommend and market.  We need to take responsibility if travel is to broaden the mind rather than reinforce prejudices.
  6. Inclusive Tourism: Growing the Local Economic Impact
    Joanna Haugen points out in Rooted,  there is a new emphasis on going local learning about and understanding "the nuances of locality in the destinations tour professionals work is an important first step in promoting offerings that meaningfully and intentionally support the people who live there." In Kerala the "West Coast Canal to be made Tourism Water-Highway" as many as 50 tourism spots will be created along the banks, local cuisine, culture, folk arts and handicrafts will be promoted so that local community reaps the benefit. At WTM Africa there was a panel discussing: How can tourism create more value for local communities?  "Let tourism create more value for local communities"
  7. Progress in Aviation?
    The International Energy Agency has just published NZE Net-Zero by 2050: a road map for the global energy sector. "The NZE assumes that aviation growth is constrained by comprehensive government policies that promote a shift towards high‐speed rail and rein in the expansion of long‐haul business travel, e.g. through taxes on commercial passenger flights" - there is more detail pp.135-6.
    In February Julian Allwood, professor of engineering and the environment at Cambridge University wrote to the Financial Times. to argue that the only way the UK can get to net-zero by 2050 is with a substantial period of no aviation at all. Rather than relying on new technologies, the sector should work to reduce emissions using existing technologies. Back in 2019 Absolute Zero warned: "All current aviation activity will be phased out within 30 years, which creates an extraordinary opportunity for other forms of international communication (for example using the technologies of today’s gaming industry to transform today’s backwards-looking video-conferencing), for the travel and leisure industry to expand more localised vacations and for developments in non-emitting mid-range transport such as electric trains and buses".
    Joanna Haugen in Sustainable Brands quotes Dr. Giulio Mattioli, faculty of spatial planning in the Department of Transport Planning at TU Dortmund. “Alternative fuels and propulsion systems may well help with climate mitigation but it will probably be a long time before they are deployed at a scale that makes a difference..... “The aviation industry has a long history of exaggerating how soon new clean technologies will be available, and how much they will help in reducing emissions, in order to deny the fact that travel-demand management measures will also be necessary.”
    A team of researchers at the University of Oxford have revealed what they say is a cost-effective and efficient way of producing jet fuel from carbon dioxide, using an inexpensive iron-based catalyst. The Oxford researchers believe the new method could produce a competitively priced fuel that could potentially eliminate the high emissions burden of air travel. more
  8. Sustainable Hospitality Handbook Booking.com
    Booking.com's 2020 survey found that demand for sustainable accommodation is growing year on year:  82% of global travellers identified sustainable travel as important to them and 70% say they’re more likely to book accommodation if they know it’s eco-friendly – even if they weren’t looking for an eco-friendly property in the first place. Half of those surveyed believe there are not enough sustainable travel options available to them, and 38% don’t know how or where to find such options. Booking.com has just published a Sustainability Guide which they describe as "the first step on our shared journey to change the travel industry together."
  9. 100% Pure Future—New Zealand Tourism Renewed
    Covid-19 has had a devastating effect on New Zealand tourism. But the industry was already troubled by unchecked growth and questionable governance that has put pressure on the environment, infrastructure and communities. To thrive, the tourism sector needs to radically rethink its role in our natural environment, society and economy. Its greatest opportunities lie in tackling its greatest liabilities...  Video
  10. Miscellany

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

RT News carries the top ten stories on RT – the are many more links to RT stories here.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD
WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

Responsible Tourism Partnership one of "5 Meaningful Voices In The Push For Responsible Tourism"

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@responsibletourismpartnership.org

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD #RTourismNews

RT NewsWTM