RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 05/2022

  1. Twenty Years of Responsible Tourism
  2. Responsible Technology for Travel & Tourism
  3. Consumer demand requires the industry to take responsibility and deliver sustainability  
  4. Responsibility Requires Transparency: Awards and Emissions Data 
  5. Travel & Tourism needs to increase its resilience - it would be foolish not to take responsibility for this 
  6. The Danger of Net Zero by 2050
  7. UK FlyZero project concludes liquid hydrogen is the optimum fuel for zero-carbon flight by 2050
  8. Can you make Canva work for you?
  9. Vancouver Island: from DMO to Social Enterprise 
  10. Miscellany 

The 2022 WTM Global  Responsible Tourism Awards are open for entries,  destinations and businesses can enter, and you can nominate others on the WTM global hub.  
The India Awards are open until 30 June and the Rest of the World category, open to all, is open until 31 August. The Gold winners in Africa, India, Latin America and the Rest of the World Awards are automatically entered into the Global Awards presented at WTM London in November. 

2022 RT Events
June 5-12  Responsible Tourism  Summer School, Finland  Jyväskylä, Central Finland & Helsinki
The 15th International Conference on Responsible Tourism takes place June 9-10   Advancing Responsible Tourism
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  1. Twenty Years of Responsible Tourism
    The Cape Town Declaration on Responsible Tourism was the outcome of an international conference, a side event to the World Summit on Sustainable Development, in 2002. At WTM Africa, 20 years on, we had panels reflecting on the progress of Responsible Tourism in South Africa and around the world, climate change, resilience, biodiversity conservation, creating shared value and the V&A Waterfront which has emerged as a leader. All the panel discussions on Responsible Tourism Day in Cape Town were recorded and can be watched here.

  2. Responsible Technology for Travel & Tourism
    Over the last twenty years, the quality and efficiency of solar panels and other technologies which can assist in reducing carbon emissions and water consumption has dramatically improved. But this technology was oversold by enthusiastic salespeople and subsequently failed to deliver. This has created resistance to it adoption and installation. At WTM Africa last month on a panel on Responsible Technology for Travel & Tourism hoteliers and lodge owners talked about their positive experience of alternative, green, technologies and Solarus explained their products. At Arabian Travel Market on May 12th in Dubai Keith Bradley, Managing Partner of Globally we have a panel of speakers who can look behind the brochures and the sales pitch to share what they have learnt about what works, what doesn't and why? For more on Responsible Technology, tech which assists in achieving sustainability click here 


  3. Consumer demand requires the industry to take responsibility and deliver sustainability

    Expedia has just released its latest Sustainable Travel Study based on a survey of 11,000 travellers from 11 countries across the Americas, Europe, Asia and Australia. more Prompted with four elements of sustainable travel, 69% said it involved lessening environmental impacts, 66% supporting local economies, 65% supporting local cultures and communities and 52%  visiting lesser-known destinations. Asked to recall which elements of sustainable travel they had seen when choosing a destination and booking travel 56% recalled options for low environmental impact, 51% noted options that are owned by/work with local cultures or communities, and 48% recalled options that supported local businesses. 60% of consumers said that they had opted for more environmentally friendly transport or accommodation.

    Consumers want more than lip service. 70% of consumers said that they had avoided a travel destination or transport option because they doubted that a declared commitment to sustainable practices was real. Consumers remain price sensitive with 74% of consumers saying that it costs too much to be more sustainable when travelling, although half say that they would be willing to pay more for more sustainable options – on average they say they would be willing to pay 38% more. 66% say that they are interested in options with low environmental impact, 64% options that support local cultures and communities and 62% options that support local economies. You can download the full report here.


  4. Responsibility Requires Transparency: Awards and Emissions Data
    As Andrew Ede has pointed out "there are the businesses, those not in tune like Radisson, which engage in greenwashing - the marketing illusion of eco-responsibility." In an effort to avoid greenwashing Federico González Tejera, CEO of Radisson Hotel Group has developed a list of 12 basic sustainability indicators required by any hotel that claims to be sustainable.  Federico González Tejera argues that, "sustainability seems to be the fashionable word, but it is too broad and confusing, which means that not only the owners but also the clients are confused by diverse claims and very vague decisions without a concrete objective”. In principle, eight of the 12 criteria are mandatory, while for the rest the hotels can commit to carrying out their implementation in the next three years. The proposed measures include actions to measure and reduce energy and water use, as well as carbon emissions , and identify and reduce waste.

    Only when there is transparency about what a business or destination is taking responsibility for and why can anyone judge whether the business or destination is responsible. In the WTM World Responsible Tourism Awards, we see many examples each year and recognise the best. This year's awards cycle is now well underway with the Africa and Latin America Awards presented and the judges' reasons on the record. The Africa and Latin America Gold Award winners will join those from India and the Rest of the World in the Global Awards to be presented at WTMLondon in November.

    Travalyst and six top travel brands have aligned on a shared framework to collect and display flight emissions data.  The framework consists of a set of shared principles and preferred methodology for estimating carbon emissions from air travel, which have been agreed upon and committed to by the Travalyst coalition partners, which include Skyscanner, Google, Booking.com, Trip.com Group, Tripadvisor and Visa. The data will enable travellers to book the most carbon-efficient flights. Google has published a Travel Impact Model for emissions estimates that further details the Travalyst framework. Read more on GreenAir
    The Travelyst Aviation Principles are Responsible Principles

    • Provide travellers with a transparent way to easily understand and compare travel options, no matter where they book their travel
    • Provide airline partners with the tools and information to accelerate their sustainability efforts
    • Be trusted, accurate and reliable
    • Be available to all industry players and serves as a benchmark for aviation sustainability

  5. Travel & Tourism needs to increase its resilience - it would be foolish not to take responsibility for this
    The UK's aviation watchdog has written to airports and airlines to express concern over the impact of staff shortages on international travel. "Staff sickness caused by coronavirus has seen airlines including EasyJet and British Airways axe dozens of flights, while the aviation industry has struggled to recruit quickly enough after making staff redundant earlier in the pandemic." Ken O'Toole, deputy chief executive at Manchester Airports Group, said: "The speed and the scale of recovery has caught us and it has meant we are short-staffed at the moment." more
    On Responsible  Tourism  Day at WTM Africa Hermione Nevill, Senior Tourism Specialist at the World Bank Group spoke about Investment for Responsible Tourism and Resilience  This was followed by a discussion about what local governments and businesses can do to survive, adapt and thrive no matter what shocks are experienced.  In 2018 Cape Town experienced a Day Zero drought, Covid and the impact of the Ukraine war.
    As António Guterres says the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reveals 'a litany of broken climate promises' by governments and businesses and accuses some of them of lying in claiming to be on track to limiting future heating to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels. In a strongly-worded rebuke, he says: 'It is a file of shame, cataloguing the empty pledges that put us firmly on track towards an unliveable world' video

    Sarah Habsburg is offering a free 15-minute webinar on her Building Tourism Resilience Facebook page


  6. The Danger of Net Zero by 2050
    In the latest IPCC report agreed by government officials, the scientists advise that carbon emissions need to shrink by 43% by the end of this decade to stay under this threshold of danger. We cannot delay efforts to achieve reductions in carbon emissions. more  As UN Secretary-General António Guterres pointed out in August last year, when the previous IPCC report was published,  it was, and is, "is a code red for humanity" but not yet hopeless "If we combine forces now, we can avert climate catastrophe. But, as today's report makes clear, there is no time for delay and no room for excuses. I count on government leaders and all stakeholders to ensure COP26 is a success." more

    As is clear from the graph to the left we have not yet even dented the inexorable increase in the greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. CO2 and other greenhouse gases we are emitting now will be causing continued global warming for many generations - even if we stopped all emissions tomorrow.

    Net Zero means not adding to the stock of greenhouse gasses in our atmosphere, this requires that we cease emitting greenhouse gases and where we can not that we remove CO2 by natural means (planting trees) or through Carbon Capture and Storage. Weaning ourselves off burning fossil fuels is expensive and consequently  there is an incentive to cheat. However, the concept of net-zero is dangerous.
    "Hopefully around the middle of this century we will achieve “net zero”. This is the point at which any residual emissions of greenhouse gases are balanced by technologies removing them from the atmosphere.
    This is a great idea, in principle. Unfortunately, in practice, it helps perpetuate a belief in technological salvation and diminishes the sense of urgency surrounding the need to curb emissions now. ... the idea of net-zero has licensed a recklessly cavalier “burn now, pay later” approach which has seen carbon emissions continue to soar. It has also hastened the destruction of the natural world by increasing deforestation today, and greatly increases the risk of further devastation in the future." (Dyke, Watson & Knorr)
    Another group of scientists have published a paper in Nature expressing serious concern about net zero being used for greenwashing:"The readiness with which a growing number of countries, sub-national entities and individual organizations have made net-zero pledges speaks to the unifying and galvanizing power of the net-zero narrative. These pledges should be encouraged. However, there is concern that these often-voluntary commitments allow too much discretion in the design of net-zero pathways and may therefore not be consistent with global net zero, or with ambitious climate action more generally24.

    Governance, accountability and reporting mechanisms are currently inadequate. Long-term ambition is often not backed up by sufficient near-term action. Many entities have not yet set out detailed plans to achieve their pledges and are opaque about the role of carbon offsets in place of cutting their own emissions1. The environmental and social integrity of some of these offsets is questionable. As a result, some advocates have accused these pledges of amounting to little more than ‘greenwashing."  Read the paper 

  7. UK FlyZero project concludes liquid hydrogen is the optimum fuel for zero-carbon flight by 2050
    The UK government has funded a 12 month Fly Zero carried out by the Aerospace Technology Institute (ATI). The report concludes that with the introduction of a mid-size hydrogen-powered aircraft by 2035 and a narrowbody aircraft by 2037, aircraft powered by liquid hydrogen represent the greatest opportunity for reducing carbon emissions and maximising market impact, and concludes aviation can achieve net-zero by 2050 through the development of both sustainable aviation fuel and green liquid hydrogen technologies. Global cumulative CO2 emissions from aviation could be reduced by 4 gigatons (Gt) by 2050 and 14 Gt by 2060 but this requires 50% of the commercial fleet to be hydrogen-powered by 2050. "FlyZero concludes green liquid hydrogen is the optimum fuel for zero-carbon emission flight and could power a mid-size aircraft with 280 passengers from London to San Francisco directly, or from London to Auckland with just one stop. Introducing a midsize hydrogen-powered aircraft by 2035 and a narrowbody aircraft by 2037 represents the greatest opportunity for reducing carbon emissions and maximising market impact, insists FlyZero." More in Green Air News   The full ATI report is available online.8. Can you make Canva work for you?
    Sarah Habsburg of the School for Responsible Tourism explains that If there is one piece of technology that everyone should have in their portfolio, it is canva.com
    Sarah explains why: "Just a quick caveat, I am not affiliated in any way with canva.com. I am just blown away by how much it revolutionised the way I manage my own graphic design. It changed the way I produce for social media, it expedited my proposal creation and it even gave me perfect templates for my kids’ letters from Father Christmas too!"
    Sarah has provided a guide to how to make Canva work for you on her blog - full of good advice.


9 Vancouver Island: from DMO to Social Enterprise
Vancouver Island is slightly larger than Belgium,  Tourism Vancouver Island, evolved ten years ago from focusing on promotion and marketing to prioritising destination management and planning. Now it is evolving into a social enterprise. Renamed 4VI,  Anthony Everett, its president and CEO, explains "“Travel is still a force for good, but we need to strike a balance between the profitability and the business side with what is best for the environment and the communities and the residents that live here. It’s about mitigating impacts but also enhancing the things that need attention.” He aims to invest about three-quarters of the organization’s profits into social responsibility activities.  more


10 Miscellany
Palau is launching Ol'au Palau
rewarding their most conscientious guests and protecting their most highly-prized tourism asset: their pristine environment and unique culture. Virtuous activities include using reef-safe sunscreen, frequenting businesses that are reducing their impact on the environment and culture, visiting culturally significant tourism sites, eating sustainably sourced local food, participating in community regenerative tourism projects, and avoiding single-use plastics. more & more & more
In Scotland, the Highlands Council is welcoming responsible visitors "Visitors are very welcome across the Highlands; we are collectively responsible for keeping the area unspoiled."
The Pakistan Tourism Development Corporation is preparing a campaign for responsible tourism in northern areas of the country, particularly Gilgit-Baltistan; creating booklets, public awareness messages, and training guides on responsible tourism that would help overcome the damage incurred by careless tourists. more
Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) has announced that by 2035, all cruise ships will essentially be equipped to use shore power as part of a member commitment to pursue net-zero carbon cruising by 2050 and plans to join the Global Maritime Forum Call to Action for Shipping Decarbonization to make zero-emission vessels and fuels the default choice by 2030. more & more\
Statista's Global Consumer Survey, reveals that 41% of British holidaymakers said they at least occasionally go to the pub when travelling, compared to just 29% for both U.S. Americans and Germans.  Just 33% of Brits said they visited museums, less than Americans (35%) Germans (37%). more
Hydrogen-powered cruising. Scandinavian naval architects have designed the MM 130 will accommodate 300 passengers and 100 crew, using fully electric propulsion, hydrogen fuel cell technology, batteries that can be charged at land-based charging stations, as well as wind power and solar power systems that enable battery charging while at sea. This ship will also be entirely self-sufficient, making its own clean fuel. Northern Xplorer plans to launch its first ship by 2024. more
Tourists will have to pre-book their visits to Venice this summer in an effort to reduce "hit and run" tourism, tourists planning on spending the night in Venice, however, will not need a prior reservation to enter the canal city. more & more
A tourism levy is being considered in Wales to raise revenue for local authorities enabling them to manage services and infrastructure which makes tourism a success. "Without such a levy, local communities face an undue burden to fund local services and provisions on which tourists rely. From keeping the beaches and pavements clean, through to maintaining local parks, toilets and footpaths – the critical infrastructure that supports tourism should be supported by all those that rely on it." more
Cardiff wants to raise occupancy thresholds to at least 182 days per year for tourist accommodation. Failure to meet this threshold could see legitimate holiday-let business owners face a second homes Council Tax premium of up to 300%.  more

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The next edition of RT News will be out in June 
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD

WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 5,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@haroldgoodwin.info 

 

RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 04/2022

  1. Climate Change 
  2. WTM Responsible Tourism Awards
  3. Victoria Falls - a new kind of DMO?
  4. Responsible Tourism Track at ITB Berlin
  5. Resilience in The Gambia 
  6. P&O Ferry Service Suspension 
  7. Sustainable Hospitality Alliance launches its "Pathway to Net Positive Hospitality for the Planet."  
  8. Mallorca: zero-tolerance of student anti-social behaviour 
  9. Chasing Lions 
  10. Miscellany

The 2022 WTM Global  Responsible Tourism Awards are open for entries,  destinations and businesses can enter, and you can nominate others on the WTM global hub.  
The India Awards are open until 30 June and the Rest of the World category, open to all, is open until 31 August. The Gold winners in Africa, India, Latin America and the Rest of the World Awards are automatically entered into the Global Awards presented at WTM London in November. 

2022 RT Events
June 5-12  Responsible Tourism  Summer School, Finland  Jyväskylä, Central Finland & Helsinki
The 15th International Conference on Responsible Tourism takes place June 9-10   Advancing Responsible Tourism
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  1. Climate Change
    António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations is spelling it out "The facts are undeniable. This abdication of leadership is criminal. The world’s biggest polluters are guilty of arson of our only home. more  Back in August, Guterres described the previous IPCC report as "a code red for humanity" adding ""If we combine forces now, we can avert climate catastrophe. But, as today's report makes clear, there is no time for delay and no room for excuses. I count on government leaders and all stakeholders to ensure COP26 is a success." There is a chasm between the fine words and policies and the lack of action to tackle climate change. As Queen Elizabeth  pointed out COP26, "It is very irritating when they talk - but don't do."
    The latest IPCC report calls for "rapid, deep and immediate" cuts in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, CO2must peak within three years to stave off the worst impacts. If all current policies were fully implemented, the world will still warm by 3.2C this century. Guterres struggles to hold leaders to account: "Some government and business leaders are saying one thing - but doing another. Simply put, they are lying. And the results will be catastrophic." more
    The amount of CO2 that the world has emitted in the last decade is the same amount that's left to us to stay under the 1.5°C threshold. We have not even dented the upward curve in greenhouse gas emissions
    The IPCC Report presents a pessimistic picture for the future of the aviation industry: " “the literature does not support the idea that there are large improvements to be made in the energy efficiency of aviation that keep pace with the projected growth in air transport"; and "CO2 mitigation of aviation to ‘net zero’ levels, as required in 1.5 ºC emission scenarios, requires fundamental shifts in technology, fuel types, or changes of behaviour or demand".
    In the UK the threshold for declaring a heatwave has been raised by the Met Office.  Eight counties have had these limits raised by the forecaster by 1°C. more

  2. WTM Responsible Tourism Awards

    WTM Latin America Responsible Tourism Award winner 2022

    The Africa and Latin AmericaResponsibleTourism Awards have been presented and the Gold winners will go through to the Global Awards to be presented at WTM London in November. The judges always explain why we recognise the business and destinations we do.

    Glynn O'Leary, (Transfrontier Parks Destinations), Derek Hanekom (former Minister of Tourism South Africa), Harold Goodwin (Chair of Judges) and Ruth Crichton (Grootbos) Ruth and Glynn both collected Judges Awards for their outstanding achievements in Responsible Tourism.

    The WTM  Africa Responsible Tourism Award winners are here
    Grootbos and Transfrontier Parks Destinations were recognised with prestigious Judges' Awards for their outstanding contributions to Responsible Tourism. Only five such awards have been presented two in India and three in Africa.
    The WTM Latin America Responsible Tourism Award winners are here.

    The 2022 WTM World Awards are still open. The India Awards are open until 30th June and the World Awards until 31st August. All the Gold winners in the four regional Awards are entered into the WTM Global Responsible Tourism Awards presented at WTM London in November. Enter Here
    The judges can only select from amongst those businesses and destinations that enter, if you know of a great example of Responsible Tourism in action please encourage them to apply


  3. Victoria Falls - a new kind of DMO?
    We are Victoria Falls won Silver in the WTM Africa Responsible Tourism Awards. They explain why winning matters to them and what they did to earn recognition.
    The experience of working together as "one big family" to survive the impacts of the pandemic has created a new grassroots organisation which the judges expect to gain in strength and manage tourism at the Vic Falls responsibly. Watch their video about what they did to survive here.  The judges explained their reasons for recognising them "We Are Victoria Falls' (WAVF) is a grassroots organisation representing the tourism community. When Covid struck tourism ceased and the 80% of the community reliant on it were without livelihoods. Their objectives were to build solidarity, inspire their community to support each other, and tell “real, truthful and inspiring stories” to recover as a destination. Building this narrative and encouraging their community to 'live it' is an important part of boosting morale and positioning their offer in the market - embodying the concept 'better places to live are better places to visit'. We wanted to inspire ourselves, inspire other resource-strapped destinations, and future visitors to our unique hometown.” 180 stakeholders joined large, small, formal and informal. WAVF focused 'on solidarity, community commitment to tourism and health preparedness'. In-kind contributions have been made by ~100 different organisations which have sponsored community initiatives, programmes, or volunteered time, resources, transport, or equipment. WAVF engaged 100 local residents to create a week-long event 'Visit your Backyard', providing a morale boost and build solidarity with other industry players”. Stakeholders in and around Hwange National Park have subsequently formed the "Association for Tourism Hwange" and Kariba stakeholders have been in discussions about how they can create a similar initiative."


     

  4. Responsible Tourism Track at ITB Berlin
    Prof. Dr. Johan Rockström, Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research and Professor of Earth System Research at the University of Potsdam, in his keynote speech at the Responsible Tourism Track pointed out that humankind is currently on a “path to disaster”, but if, instead of slow changes, there is a radical response to climate protection, it is still possible to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees. Caroline Bremner, Head of Travel and Tourism Research at Euromonitor International,  presented a keynote speech “From Carbon Neutral Destinations to Regenerative Tourism: Boundaries and Implementation” At ITB there was a discussion about “Carbon neutrality is not enough“ and ’From Carbon Neutral Destinations to Regenerative Tourism: Boundaries and Implementation’, there were discussions about refugee aid, diversity, LGBTQ+, and the impacts of the pandemic on informal workers in the sector. more


  5. Resilience in The Gambia
    The Gambia in West Africa closed it borders for nearly a year to keep Covid out. Adama Bah discusses how the people fared. It is clear that with remittances from the Gambian diaspora amounting to nearly 60% of GDP during the Covid lockdowns and a strong sense of responsibility for the welfare of all within the family The Gambia has proved very resilient. Tourism is 20% of the economy in normal times, closing their borders to fend off Covid cost the country dear. The Gambia survived and recovered from the coup and travel bans in 1994, Ebola in West Africa in 2014 and most recently Covid. 13% of the population are now fully vaccinated and they have not yet passed 365 deaths. The Gambia has reopened for tourism with 30% occupancy. But most of those coming are repeat visitors which means that they do not spend much on craft. The Gambia is a culturally and socially rich country despite the low level of income per head. Resilience in The Gambia is based on the closely-knit family and the extended family system. Everyone is their other' brothers’ and sisters’ keeper and that obligation continues with the diaspora, the emigres are expected to contribute to their immediate and extended family. As the African proverb goes it takes a whole village to bring up a child. more


  6. P&O Ferry Service Suspension
    On 17th March P&O Ferries sacked 800 staff. "Reports of workers being given zero notice and escorted off their ships... shows the insensitive way in which P&O have approached this issue," said Robert Courts, parliamentary under-secretary for transport. Courts, the junior minister, said. "I am extremely concerned and frankly angry at the way workers have been treated by P&O." Mr Courts said the company had told him it will be suspending services for "a week to 10 days while they locate new crew" on the Dover to Calais, Larne to Cairnryan, Dublin to Liverpool and Hull to Rotterdam routes. P&O Ferries is one of the UK's leading ferry companies, carrying more than 10 million passengers a year before the pandemic and about 15% of all freight cargo in and out of the UK. P&O claimed almost £15m in government grants in 2020, which included furlough payments for its employees. more  As this newsletter goes to print the P&O Ferry services across the channel are still suspended, P&O are apparently still unable to demonstrate that they can operate safely. Operation Brock is functioning with lorries parked on the M20 contributing to congestion across Kent.


  7.  Sustainable Hospitality Alliance (SHA)  launches its "Pathway to Net Positive Hospitality for the Planet."
    The Pathway is designed to enable every hotel around the world to aim for net positive environmental impacts, whatever their starting point. "The Pathway provides a practical, four-stage guidance framework as a free resource that supports all parts of the hospitality value chain to progress in a cohesive, strategic manner. It includes detailed action guidance for hotel operators, brands and asset owners, applicable to both single or multi-unit organisations. Wolfgang M. Neumann, Chair, Sustainable Hospitality Alliance describes the ambition: “Our Pathway fills the current vacuum of a co-ordinated and focussed strategic plan across the hospitality industry to tackle the urgently needed climate actions. It is a practical tool for any hotel, no matter their starting point, to obtain guidance on how to prioritise and sequence targeted and measurable climate actions. The Alliance wants to encourage all hotels to embrace the journey all the way to net positive. We are spearheading the dialogue beyond having ‘zero’ impact and setting a vision for what we can be putting back into the natural world with a lasting ‘positive’ impact on our planet and its people.”
    The first two stages of the Pathway to Net Positive Hospitality launched in March 2022. The final two stages of the Pathway will be released later in 2022 after further consultation to account for the changing landscape and fully explore the more complex challenges.  The Pathway


  8. Mallorca: zero-tolerance of student anti-social behaviour
    The behaviour of Spanish students from the mainland holidaying in Mallorca remains an issue of concern for the Mallorca Hoteliers Federation, the Playa de Palma Hoteliers Association and the Aviba association of travel agencies in the Balearics. They are promoting a  message of "zero tolerance" towards bad behaviour is to be promoted ahead of the coming season. "The objective is not to put the image of the destination at risk, so the current regulations against this type of behaviour will be strictly applied against those who break the law or who behave in an anti-social manner." more


  9. Chasing Lions
    Amanda Marks of  Tribes Travel has published her second book.
    "When Amanda is mugged by a gang of schoolkids, she knows things have to change. She decides to go in search of her inner lion. It proves to be a bruising experience both physically and mentally. But she perseveres and surprises herself by becoming a truck-driving tour leader in the bohemian and male-dominated world of overland expeditions. Over three years and 55,000 miles, Amanda faces her feelings of inadequacy as she strives to discover her roar. On her journey, she watches the moon rise over the Serengeti and the sun set behind Egypt’s pyramids, she rafts with Zambezi river gods and communes with gorillas, she faces lions in the wild, has her fortune told by a crab sorcerer . . . and meets her soulmate?


  10. Miscellany
    Disability-friendly travel: the German National Tourist Board (GNTB) is celebrating a decade of commitment to developing  barrier-free tourism
    The Best Sustainability Resources: Knowledge for Responsible Hoteliers more
    Uganda has broken away from the traditional safari narrative, the new message is to not just visit Uganda’s sights, but to stay longer and explore its diverse corners beyond the gorillas and the Big 5.
    John Pagani CEO of The Red Sea Development Company (TRSDC) and AMAALA, points out that “Sustainability is more expensive, at least today, but competition will ultimately drive cost down, making sustainability more available.”  more
    The GCC  is poised to develop as a major destination market for global tourism with sustainability and regeneration ambitions more
    In Scotland, Caithness and Sutherland tourism group launches 'Breathing Space’ campaign more
    In Pakistan: Irresponsible tourism and littering is a constant threat to the mesmerising environment of Margalla Hills National Park (MHNP), which is home to numerous species of flora and fauna.
    Keep Scotland Unspoiled will use social media, local radio and digital marketing to educate, inspire and inform people about issues such as water safety, fire safety, dog control and the need to adhere to the Scottish Outdoor Access Code.
    From Petra to the Dead sea and Dana, Jordan, a new ‘Meaningful Travel Map’ guides visitors away from tourism hotspots to ensure their money is well spent across the country and their visit is enriched too. more
    The Institute of Travel and Tourism of The Gambia (ITToG) have launched a manual for Community Based Tourism (CBT) in The Gambia. more
    Undertourism Is Also Bad For Our Planet: Here’s How You Can HelpA dearth of tourists may mean fewer protections for natural habitats, so spend your dollars wisely. more

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The next edition of RT News will be out in May  
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD

WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 5,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@haroldgoodwin.info 

RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 03/2022

  1. War in Ukraine
  2. The Global Responsible Tourism Awards 

  3. Climate Change Net-Zero by 2050 is too late
  4. Adaptation & Decarbonisation 
  5. Responsible Aviation 
  6. Covid a new normal?
  7. WTM Africa, ATM  and Latin America 
  8. OTAs and Growing Direct Bookings
  9. Airbnb 
  10. Miscellany

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The 2022 WTM Global  Responsible Tourism Awards are open for entries,  destinations and businesses can enter, and you can nominate others on the WTM global hub.  

2022 RT Events
April 5-7 WTM Latin America 
April 11-13 WTM Africa, Cape Town The WTM Africa Awards 11th Africa Responsible Tourism Day 12th April 
June 5-12  Responsible Tourism  Summer School, Finland  Jyväskylä, Central Finland & Helsinki
The 15th International Conference on Responsible Tourism takes place June 9-10   Advancing Responsible Tourism
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1. War in Ukraine
The invasion of Ukraine is a tragedy on a scale not seen in Europe since WWII, although there have been wars in the Balkans in the decade 1991-2001 resulting  ±130,000 deaths    Members of the UN General Assembly demanded that all parties respect the principles of the Charter of the United Nations, especially provisions on security and peace among countries. The UN General Assembly demanded that Russia stop its offensive in Ukraine, voting 141 to five with 35 abstentions. As this edition of RTNews goes to print the situation in Ukraine is horrific with large numbers of dead and injured refugees and people fleeing to safety.

We hear mostly about Putin's spurious reasons for the war, his view of the indivisibility of the Russian and Ukrainian people and the denazification of Ukraine, much less about the importance of Ukraine's agriculture to the global food supply. In July last year, the EU and Ukraine signed a strategic partnership on raw materials and batteries to foster closer integration of critical raw materials and battery value chains for mutual benefit.  This war will have major implications for travel and tourism which requires peace and relies on respect for international law and the rules-based system which emerged post-WWII.  Over the last decade, the international rules-based system has looked fragile, it is fractured now.

Airlines are avoiding flying over Russia, with airlines from Japan to Europe flying across the Pacific and over Alaska, a much longer flight. Western countries have blocked their airspace to Russian carriers. "Russia’s fleet of commercial planes relies heavily on leasing arrangements. Russian operators rent 515 aircraft from foreign leasing companies that are affected by the sanctions, out of 861 planes in service, according to aviation data specialist Cirium."  The international sanctions efforts to cease them has resulted in them being grounded in Russia. "The market value of foreign-leased aircraft currently flown by Russian airlines amounts to about $12 billion, according to an analysis by London-based aviation advisory firm, Ishka." The financial costs resulting are expected to fall on insurers for the leasing companies." The EU and U.K. have instructed insurance companies to withdraw coverage of Russian airlines and Sabre and Amadeus have removed Aeroflot from their systems.  more

Alexei Mordashov has resigned from the Tui Group supervisory board after being sanctioned by the EU, his family is reported to own 34% of TUI. Of course, TUI is not being sanctioned, Mordashov's assets are frozen. Tui Group chief executive Fritz Joussen wrote to staff reporting that Tui was in contact with service providers in Ukraine to keep staff members and their families safe and that Tui Cruises was “intensively” looking after Ukrainian crew members. “A solution is not in our hands. This is the time of the governments and the community of states. .... One thing is clear: we will be true to our values and show our position. Like hardly any other sector, tourism stands for international understanding and peaceful exchange across borders and cultures – we feel particularly committed to this.”  more

Airbnb has announced that they will offer free, short-term housing to up to 100,000 refugees fleeing Ukraine. These stays will be funded by Airbnb, Inc., donors to the Airbnb.org Refugee Fund, and the generosity of Hosts through Airbnb.org. Anyone interested in opening their homes to support this effort can learn how to get involved at airbnb.org/help-ukraine.  Over the past five years, Airbnb and Airbnb.org have connected more than 54,000 refugees and asylees – including those from Syria, Venezuela and Afghanistan – to temporary housing through Airbnb.org partners. Last year, Airbnb.org announced the creation of its Refugee Fund and has galvanized more than 4,000 donors to further support its work with refugees and asylum seekers worldwide. As ECPAT UK and others have reminded us the EU predicts Russia’s invasion of Ukraine could displace as many as seven million Ukrainians internally and create four million refugees, significantly increasing the risk of trafficking and exploitation for all people escaping conflict but especially children.

Hospitality for Ukraine is a global campaign set up by hospitality marketing agency Stay the Night and content creator Kash Bhattacharya (Budget Traveller) which aims to help link Ukrainian refugees seeking accommodation with providers who are willing and able to host them.

Hundreds have apparently been booking Airbnbs in Kyiv in an effort to send monetary assistance to Ukrainians and using "the rental platform to exchange heartfelt messages of support." Airbnb has waived all guest and host fees on all bookings in Ukraine.  The Airbnb platform provides the human contact craved in these situations. Donating in this way may secure a personal response but the recipient may not be able to obtain the cash and may not be resident in Ukraine. As Simon Calder wrote on Twitter  "Warning: were I a Russian scammer, I would be setting up fake Airbnbs in Kiev and Odesa as fast as I could to cash in on those noble intentions.” more

UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency created the website help.unhcr.org/ukraine for refugees and asylum seekers in Ukraine.

The founder of Earth Changers, Vicky Smith, with Kirsi Hyvaerinen from the European Ecotourism Network, has curated a list of organisations actively supporting refugees and the casualties of war in Ukraine. Vicky’s list of travel organisations helping Ukrainian refugees is unlikely to be complete, but it is long: Airbnb, Deutsche Bahn, Eurostar, Hospitality for Ukraine, Hospitality Helps, Host4Ukraine, Stay the Night, Uber, Wizz Air and Ukrainian Railways + Rail operators from Germany, Poland, Hungary, the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Lithuania and Czech republic are offering train travel for free for Ukraine refugees. Vicky also has a list of aid agencies and organisations working to alleviate the suffering caused by Putin. The list is here.

 


2. The Global Responsible Tourism Awards 

Every year remarkable new responsible businesses and destinations are ‘discovered’ and recognised through the Awards. Entering is an opportunity to showcase the impact you are having and what you have achieved. Being recognised will bring you a business advantage. If you know of businesses and destinations doing good work and taking responsibility, please nominate them and encourage them to apply. The Judges can only select from amongst those that apply. Free to enter, they provide an opportunity to showcase your achievements on a global stage. Entries can still be submitted for India (until 30 Jun 2022) and the Rest of the World (until 31 Aug 2022). Those winning Gold in the regional awards are entered for the Global Awards presented at WTM London in November.  Enter here 

  1. Decarbonising Travel & Tourism,
  2. Sustaining Employees and Communities through the Pandemic,
  3. Destinations Building Back Better Post-COVID,
  4. Increasing Diversity in Tourism: How inclusive is our industry?
  5. Reducing Plastic Waste in the Environment
  6. Growing the Local Economic Benefit
  7. Access for the differently-abled as travellers, employees and holidaymakers.
  8. Increasing tourism's contribution to natural heritage and biodiversity
  9. Conserving water and improving water security and supply for neighbours
  10. Contributing  to cultural heritage

3. Climate Change Net-Zero by 2050 is too late

Climate Change has arrived, and it is here to stay. We have failed to slow, let alone reverse, the accumulation of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. We are threatening the future well-being of our species. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the IPCC, has just published its latest report on the consequences of climate change. It makes grim reading. No one should be surprised by its contents; there is nothing new in the report Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability. The IPCC reports "the increasingly severe, interconnected and often irreversible impacts of climate change on ecosystems, biodiversity, and human systems." Greenhouse gases continue to accumulate, in January 2020, the concentration of CO2 in our atmosphere was 413.30 ppm. In January this year, it reached 417.99 – not even the global economic slowdown caused by Covid has slowed the rate of growth of emissions.

By 2050 many of today’s decision-makers will be deceased or in their dotage. Carbon emissions accumulate in our atmosphere and heat our planet. Our emissions today will be contributing to global warming for decades to come. By 2050 irreparable damage will have been done. The key figure to watch is the concentration of CO2 in our atmosphere and we have not yet even dented the curve.

The IPCC report identifies “irreversible impacts as natural and human systems are pushed beyond their ability to adapt.” They report with high confidence that “Climate change has caused substantial damages, and increasingly irreversible losses, in terrestrial, freshwater and coastal and open ocean marine ecosystems” and “Widespread deterioration of ecosystem structure and function, resilience and natural adaptive capacity, as well as shifts in seasonal timing have occurred due to climate change with adverse socioeconomic consequences.” We are in the critical decade action is required now.

The IPCC concludes with very high confidence: "The cumulative scientific evidence is unequivocal: Climate change is a threat to human well-being and planetary health. Any further delay in concerted anticipatory global action on adaptation and mitigation will miss a brief and rapidly closing window of opportunity to secure a liveable and sustainable future for all.

There was some optimism at COP26 in Glasgow in November - there is more pessimism now.  For the evidence see Bloomberg 11th February 
For more on the impacts of climate change on our species see ScienceInsider


Resilience and climate change
Climate change is a clear and present danger. Greenhouse gases continue to accumulate; in January 2020, the concentration of CO2 in our atmosphere was 413.30 ppm. In January of this year, it reached 417.99 – not even the global economic slowdown caused by Covid has slowed the growth of emissions. At WTM Africa on 12 April in the Responsible Tourism programme, we have sessions on climate change and resilience.


4. Adaptation & Decarbonisation
The end of February saw extensive flooding in Australia, for dairy farmers in New South Wales ad Queensland flooding the third natural disaster in three years -floods, bushfires and now floods again. more
The Centre for Disaster Philanthropy website has detail on five current climate generated humanitarian disasters.  In the US the 2022 Sea Level Rise Technical Report a collaboration between eight government agencies warning"  that "Sea level rise will create a profound shift in coastal flooding over the next 30 years by causing tide and storm surge heights to increase and reach further inland. By 2050, “moderate” (typically damaging) flooding is expected to occur, on average, more than 10 times as often as it does today, and can be intensified by local factors.... Current and future emissions matter. About 2 feet (0.6 meters) of sea level rise along the U.S. coastline is increasingly likely between 2020 and 2100 because of emissions to date. Failing to curb future emissions could cause an additional 1.5 - 5 feet (0.5 - 1.5 meters) of rise for a total of 3.5 - 7 feet (1.1 - 2.1 meters) by the end of this century."

Back in 2006, The Stern Review  concluded that  "the benefits of strong and early action far outweigh the economic costs of not acting.” The Stern Review recognised that the costs of stabilising the climate are significant but manageable; delay would be dangerous and much more costly. 15+ years later procrastination continues and no we have to reduce emissions and adapt to change. Ilan Kelman, Professor of Disasters and Health at University College London, points out that: "The IPCC’s summary entirely avoids the phrase “natural disaster”. This reflects decades of work explaining that disasters are caused by sources of vulnerability – such as unequal and inequitable access to essential services like healthcare or poorly designed or built infrastructure like power plants – rather than by the climate or other environmental influences. ... The report explains that places with “poverty, governance challenges and limited access to basic services and resources, violent conflict and high levels of climate-sensitive livelihoods” are more vulnerable to climate change impacts. IPCC report: how politics – not climate change – is responsible for disasters and conflict


5. Responsible Aviation
Aviation is working to get back to business as usual, during the pandemic crisis Lufthansa is reported in The Independent to be flying 18,000 "ghost flights" over this winter to retain their take-off and landing slots at airports. In March 2020, The Independent reported that, despite running just a tiny number of rescue flights during the coronavirus lockdown, Ryanair still appeared to be flying most of its fleet on a regular basis. The Guardian reported during the pandemic 15,000 ‘ghost flights’ took off from UK airports, the data was secured through a parliamentary question.

Routes reported on 50 new routes starting this month.   KLM and Air France have introduced Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) levy to their ticket prices, adding between €1 and €12 to the cost of a ticket, the airlines claim that this contributes to sustainability. By increasing the use of SAF, presently only about 0.1% of total fuel usage in the aviation industry. By burning more SAF the airlines hope to increase supply.more 

There has been much PR about the Toulouse Declaration, International Aviation Policy Consultant, Chris Lyle has pointed out that "no aviation NGO participated in the Summit or signed the Declaration, nor did any tourism entity - despite the sector’s heavily dependent and symbiotic relationship with air transport." It is far from a breakthrough. Chris Lyle writes "The absence of specification of any intermediate targets towards net zero 2050 (notably the UNFCCC’s recognized need to cut CO2 emissions by half from 2019 levels by 2030) makes both declarations [Toulouse & IACAC] at COP26  more wishful thinking than credible in themselves, and for Europe the Fit for 55 and RefuelEU Aviation initiatives already go much further. Signing on to such “least common denominator” declarations may be a sine qua non for displaying green credentials but lacks any real committal." More on the Platform for Change.

More optimistically a report by the International Council on Clean Transportation concludes that "Compared to fossil-fuel aircraft, LH2-powered aircraft will be heavier, with an increased maximum takeoff mass (MTOM), and less efficient, with a higher energy requirement per revenue-passenger-kilometer (MJ/RPK). They will also have a shorter range than fossil-fuel aircraft. Nevertheless, we estimate that evolutionary LH2-powered narrow-body aircraft could transport 165 passengers up to 3,400 km and LH2-powered turboprop aircraft could transport 70 passengers up to 1,400 km. Together, they could service about one-third (31 to 38%) of all passenger aviation traffic, as measured by revenue passenger kilometers (RPKs). [LH2,  the liquid state of the element hydrogen]


6. Covid a new normal?
The global death toll from Covid-19 has now reached 6 million, with 445m cases recorded by the WHO. They recorded 10.3 million new cases in the last week and still, only 56% of the world's population has been fully vaccinated an average obscuring considerable differences between countries. For detailed data by country look here.  There are efforts in many parts of the world to get travel and tourism up and running, but there are challenges in that too.  The Gambia has reopened for tourism but business is slow in a country where, in 2019, 15% of the country’s GDP (2019) was tourism-based with 200,000 jobs, directly and indirectly in the sector, the IMF estimates that 20% of businesses failed during the pandemic. The Gambia has the benefit of a significant number of loyal repeat visitors and they are beginning to return. To ensure a more resilient industry The Gambia is encouraging domestic tourism and luring African tourists from neighbouring countries, where travel restrictions are less invasive. more 
Tour operators in Australia are struggling to find staff as international tourism returns, staff are reluctant to return unless they have guaranteed income and the operators cannot offer that as business restarts. "They've got to find drivers again, they've got to retrain people and … we've got big holes to fill." more 
As tourists begin thinking about an overseas holiday, some destinations are wary about having too many back. Kyoto's Mayor Daisaku Kadokawa said back in 2020: "Kyoto is not a tourist town.... We're not going to go back to pre-corona tourism." Indonesia's Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment, Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, said last year. "We'll aim for quality tourism in Bali, so we won't allow backpackers to enter once the reopening plan for international travellers is officially put in place in the near future," A spokesperson explained "What was meant were visitors who disobey regulations or protocols on health, law, and immigration," The Mayor of Prague wants to reduce pub crawls, limit alcohol serving times and encourage tourists to visit other, lesser-known parts of the city. Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro said in September 2021 the 10€ entrance charge would make tourism in the city more sustainable. "I expect protests, lawsuits, everything … but I have a duty to make this city liveable for those who inhabit it and also for those who want to visit." In Amsterdam, the city hall has taken action against tourists who get drunk and sleep in their cars, and increased patrols in busy areas, especially on weekends. "Visitors who treat our residents and heritage with disrespect are not welcome. The message we have for them is: don't come to Amsterdam."  "We do not want to go back to what we saw before the pandemic, where massive crowds in the red-light district and the city's entertainment areas caused a nuisance to residents," More


7. WTM Africa, ATM  and Latin America
There is a full programme of RT at WTM  Latin America 5-7 April and  WTM Africa 11-13  April. In Cape Town, there are twelve sessions covering a wide range of topical issues including resilience, tackling climate change, shared value, biodiversity conservation,  progress towards sustainability over the last two decades and much more. There are  The Africa RT Awards are being presented on Monday 11th with a full programme of RT panels, interviews and presentations on 12th. The detailed programme is available here.   At ATM there is a panel on Thursday 12th May 11:45-12:30. Responsible Technology for Travel & Tourism.

WTM Latin America is dedicating one auditorium exclusively to debating responsible tourism with more than 10 sessions. Simon Mayle, director of WTM Latin America explains “We need to take responsibility for the positive and negative impacts that tourism has on destinations, and that’s because we want to have better places to live in and visit – in that order. And when we say “we” that means the entire industry, including tourists.” Gustavo Pinto, WTM Latin America’s adviser for responsible tourism and the Awards coordinator explains why Responsible Tourism matters: “For some time now, tourism has been taking many forms. Suppliers and visitors alike have come to understand that destinations are more than just fun and consumption. These places, which are coveted by many, have their residents, nature, and history, and everything must be respected and preserved” more


8. OTAs and Growing Direct Bookings
Siteminder’s annual list of the Top 12 sources of hotel bookings released in January highlights the sustained growth of direct bookings for hotels. They report that direct bookings are "now one of the top two revenue drivers in more than half (12) of global markets—up from five markets last year and two in 2019—driven by increased investments in booking engines, hotel websites, metasearch, frictionless payments, support from hotel consultants and specialist applications designed for conversion." In Australia, France, Germany, Italy, South Africa, Spain and the UK direct bookings are reported by Siteminder to be in second place for bookings behind Booking.com. In Mexico they are third behind Booking.com and Expedia, in Thailand third behind Bookig.com ad Agoda and in the USA third behind Expedia and Booking.com.
The pandemic has catalysed an increase in direct bookings, SiteMinder’s senior director of global demand partnerships, James Bishop said reflecting on 2020  “With international travel restrictions in place and rising cases of coronavirus around the world, many consumers were drawn to local hotel accommodations where the direct hotel website has always performed well, or through local booking channels, which, after an initial slump, saw an uptick from pent-up travel demand. more
As Sarah Habsburg points out "in 12 markets, direct bookings are now ranked as the second-top producer of booking revenue for local hotels, up from five markets last year and just two in 2019."  Where businesses sell direct and avoid commissions earnings are greater. more
Sarah ran a panel discussion on how to grow direct bookings. One of the participants emailed to say "I’ve just watched the video again, and think it's brilliant - Sarah  - you gave such good advice during the presentation - I think [we] need to retain you as a consultant to help us beat/outwit the OTA’s". Watch the panel discussion here 
Read more from Sarah on How to Drive More Direct Bookings to Your Hotel  and "Bookings from Agoda via Booking.com? A guide to understanding why and tips for taking back control."


9. Airbnb

Airbnb now provides in its Help Centre for Airbnb hosts advice on "Responsible hosting for Airbnb Experiences". "Each article has information about situational and location-based rules, including laws, regulations, taxation, best practices, and other considerations that apply to hosts of places to stay on Airbnb" across Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe and North & South America. more There is detailed advice for Airbnb hosts by nation and region, the UK has  18 regions for which there is detailed Airbnb advice from the southeast to Inverness.
The Scottish government estimates that there are 32,000 properties in Scotland registered with Airbnb alone. The Scottish government has introduced legislation to impose new safety regulations. The purpose of the legislation is to ensure a better balance between the concerns of communities about housing supply and visitor impact and the economic and tourism benefits. Councils will have powers to ensure that planning permission will always be required for the change of use of whole properties to short-term lets and to impose taxes on Airbnb income.  more
Six months after announcing its commitment to offer free, temporary housing to 20,000 Afghan refugees, Airbnb.org has met that goal. Thanks to the generosity of Airbnb Hosts who stepped up to share their home for free or at a discounted rate, Airbnb.org was able to provide housing to nearly 1,300 additional Afghan newcomers, in addition to the 20,000 stays fully funded by Airbnb.org and Airbnb. Through Airbnb.org, the Airbnb community will continue to be a crucial resource for newly arriving Afghans as well as other newcomers, with the goal of providing housing to another 20,000 refugees. more 


10. Miscellany

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The next edition of RT News will be out in April  
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD

WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 5,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@haroldgoodwin.info 

RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 02/ 2022

  1. The World RT Awards 2022 - Africa Regional Awards close 28th February
  2. RT at WTM Africa April 11-13 April - Building Resilience 

    (c) Visual Capitalist 

  3. Impacts of Covid 
  4. Adaptation
  5. Aviation 
  6. Wheel the World - extending access for the differently-abled 
  7. Plastic Pollution - a planetary emergency 
  8. RT becoming mainstream? 
  9. Responsible Tour Operating 
  10.  Miscellany

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The 2022 WTM Global  Responsible Tourism Awards are open for entries,  destinations and businesses can enter, and you can nominate others on the WTM global hub.  

2022 RT Events
April 11-13 WTM Africa, Cape Town The WTM Africa Awards 11th Africa Responsible Tourism Day 12th April 
June 5-12  Responsible Tourism  Summer School, Finland  Jyväskylä, Central Finland & Helsinki
The 15th International Conference on Responsible Tourism takes place June 9-10   Advancing Responsible Tourism

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1. The World RT Awards 2022 

Destinations and businesses can enter and you can nominate others on the Responsible Tourism Awards website. 
The Africa Regional Awards close on 28th February 

Apply and nominate here
Exceptionally, there are 10 categories for the World Responsible Tourism Awards in 2022:


2. RT at WTM Africa April 11-13 April - Building Resilience

The Africa Awards will be presented on 11th and then a full day of talks, panels and presentations on 12th. Twenty years of Responsible Tourism in Cape Town, the Platform for Change, a Conversation with the V&A Waterfront, Local Economic Development: Creating Shared Value, Tackling Climate Change, Investment for Responsible Tourism & Resilience, conservation and nature recovery and Responsible Technology for Travel & Tourism.  more  Covid-19 has accelerated some trends in travel and tourism and reminded us of how vulnerable travel and tourism is in the face of health scares and economic recession. Our sector is perhaps the most vulnerable just in time industry. Responsibility was widely used in the industry to provide reassurance to travellers, the RT programme at WYM Africa focuses on rebuilding the sector. more


3. Impacts of Covid

In the latest World Economic Forum's  Global Risks Report, infectious disease comes fifth after extreme weather, livelihood crises, climate action failure and the erosion of social cohesion. Out of 37 risks respondents were asked to identify those they believed would be critical in the next two years. 84% of respondents reported that they were either worried or concerned, a mere 3.7% were optimistic. more
In the UK the death rate for flu ranges between 0.1 and 0.2%, between one death in 1,000 cases and one death in 500. In May 2020 Covid case fatalities peaked at one death in six cases. The latest case fatality rates in England in the seven days up to January 26 are now just 0.14 per cent - one death in 714 positive cases. The omicron variant appears to be about as dangerous as flu. Cumulatively Covid has been deadlier than flu, but the omicron variant now dominant is much less deadly. "While it is impossible to predict the future, maybe omicron has given us hope that the virus is starting to behave like others before it: evolving primarily to spread, not to kill." more 

The dominance of omicron is good news for travel and tourism and more countries are opening for tourism but in large parts of the world, vaccination rates are very low ranging from 4.3% in low-income countries to 69.9% in high-income countries. Viruses mutate a process facilitated by their circulation. Continued vigilance is essential as are efforts to increase the spread of vaccination for moral and self-interest reasons. In the UK scientists have warned the government that allowing large numbers of people in lower-income countries to go unvaccinated is "reckless" and could lead to new Covid variants. more At the World Economic Forum in January the United Nations’ Secretary-General, António Guterres, told world and business leaders that “global solidarity is missing in action”. “The last two years have demonstrated a simple but brutal truth - if we leave anyone behind, we leave everyone behind”, the UN chief said. more 

Modelling by Edge Health and Oxera, a specialist research consultancy that works with the NHS, found that travel restrictions could only delay the peak of a new variant by between two and eight days – but only if they were imposed as the variant was first brought in. "It took 16 days for the UK to detect and react to the omicron variant after it had already arrived, suggesting any tests would only be introduced long after they could have any effect in delaying the peak of the virus." more This latest UK research supports the WHO and UNWTO: " “When it comes to stopping the spread of new virus variants, blanket travel restrictions are simply counterproductive. In fact, by cutting the lifeline of tourism, these restrictions do more harm than good, especially in destinations reliant on international tourists for jobs, economic wellbeing and sustainable change.” more


 

4. Adaptation

The World Economic Forum research has identified the critical importance of mitigating and adapting to climate change.

"Climate change is happening now. It is one of the biggest challenges of our generation and has already begun to cause irreversible damage to our planet and way of life." In the UK the government has admitted that its efforts to insulate the UK from climate change impacts have been inadequate and identified 61 climate risks cutting across multiple sectors of society: biodiversity, soil health, tree loss, agriculture, power shortages, health and security. more

Australia again experienced 50.7° C at Onslow, in Western Australia, Mardie and Roebourne, reported temperatures of more than 50C, more  In the Arctic frozen ground is thawing.  !Five million people live on Arctic permafrost including in Russia, North America and Scandinavia. .... Scientists studying the Arctic say that 70% of infrastructure and 30-50% of critical infrastructure is at high risk of damage by 2050, with projected cost of tens of billions of dollars." more


5. Aviation 

Chris Lyle has identified 2022 as a critical year for change if net-zero international aviation emissions are to be achieved by 2050. His conclusion is sobering " ICAO measures can only be limited and action by coalitions of the more ambitious will be a necessary means of supplementing the ICAO guidance, or perhaps even the primary mitigation measures – with demand management already appearing above the horizon." more
Meanwhile, enlightened airlines continue to make progress. Eviation expects to deliver 12 Alice eCargo electric aircraft to DHL Express in 2024. Air France and KLM have introduced a compulsory levy of €1-€12 on departures from France and the Netherlands to fund investment in Sustainable Aviation Fuel. more


6. Wheel the World - extending access for the differently-abled

 

Wheel the World has launched new accessible multi-day group tours for 2022, helping travellers with disabilities travel together to discover some of the world’s greatest wonders.


7. Plastic Pollution-  a planetary  emergency
The Environmental Investigation Agency, a UK registered charity, has just published a report Connecting the Dots: Plastic pollution and the planetary emergency pulls together recent scientific data on the broad impact of plastics on climate, biodiversity, human health and the environment – and it warns that only a robust global treaty for plastics can address the problem.

Humankind’s addiction to plastic and failure to prevent it contaminating the food web directly undermines human health, drives biodiversity loss, exacerbates climate change and risks generating large-scale harmful environmental changes. “Plastic emissions into the oceans alone are due to triple by 2040, in line with growing plastics production, and if this tidal wave of pollution continues unchecked, the anticipated 646 million tonnes of plastics in the seas by that date could exceed the collective weight of all fish in the ocean.” more

 


8. RT becoming mainstream?
The New York Times publishes an annual list of destinations to visit, for 2022 they have identified 52 places where visitors can be part of the solution to problems like overtourism and climate change. Beyond the pandemic, there is a profound shift underway in the world’s understanding of climate change and the swiftness and degree to which we are already seeing its effects. Wildfires, floods, dangerous storms, rising water levels and temperatures: all remind us how fragile our world really is. The travel industry is responsible for somewhere between 8 and 11 per cent of total greenhouse gas emissions, according to the World Travel & Tourism Council, and at the Glasgow climate summit this fall, the tourism industry made its first commitment to cut carbon emissions in half by 2030 and reach “net zero” by 2050. Travel supports depleted economies in places that depend on tourists’ dollars and opens the eyes of travellers to cultures and customs different from their own. That thought is the animating spirit behind this year’s list, “52 Places for a Changed World.”
Investment Monitor interviewed H.E. Ali Hassan Al Shaiba, executive director of tourism and marketing, Department of Culture and Tourism Abu Dhabi. He described RT and what it means for Abu Dhabi"Responsible tourism means building a more sustainable and reliable future for tourism, making our cities safer and better to visit, and ensuring every aspect of the tourism industry, including the environment and culture, is involved in creating a sustainable tourist destination by cultivating meaningful relationships between locals and tourists to create memorable experiences. It also means being culturally appropriate, reducing environmental and social impacts, and enhancing and conserving cultural heritage." more


9. Responsible Tour Operating
Since January 1st Contiki has implemented a five-point Climate Action Plan committing to carbon reductions and evolving to support the transition to a low-carbon future. They have included transfer emissions calculated by taking transfer modes, distances, fuel type, passenger numbers and number of vehicles used for selected trips. Accommodation emissions based on average energy consumption by room type from the Cornell University School of Hotel Administration. A regional energy factor is applied resulting in a unique average for each room type in each region. Emissions from meals have been calculated based on two main identifying factors – buffet vs. non-buffet and vegetarian vs. non-vegetarian meals. Synergy Enterprises developed customised emission factors for each meal type that accounts for food production and food waste. They are leaving it to individual travellers to offset their flights, any services not included in the base price of the trip, emissions produced by facilities or buildings we visit on their trips, meals purchased by the traveller, above those included in the cost of the trip. Contiki has published the average carbon footprint per person per day on a Contiki trip. More

Intrepid has created twenty-two new impact initiatives for its itineraries in 2022, experiences that directly support environmental or wildlife conservation, preserving Indigenous cultures and supporting marginalized groups around the world to give Intrepid travellers more opportunities for responsible travel practices.  more
G Adventures report that close to a third of their global consumer panel say they’ll put more focus on travelling responsibly in 2022. 66% of their ravellers want their money to directly benefit local people and workations have hit the mainstream. Of our panel respondents, 24% said they’re able to work from anywhere — with that number jumping to 46% for 18 - 34 year olds. An increasing number of people (37% up from 19% in December 2020) plan to combine work with future travel. 54% of respondents want to pause social media and reduce screen time, with 28% saying socializing and meeting new people is their top wellbeing priority for booking their next holiday. Although the term ‘revenge travel’ gained popularity over the course of the pandemic, reconnection travel now sits at 42% compared to revenge travel at 14%. More


10 Miscellany

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The next edition of RT News will be out in March 
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

 

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD

WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 5,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@haroldgoodwin.info 

RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 01/ 2022

  1. Climate Change and Covid in 2022 - who bears the cost?
  2. Aviation - carbon emissions curve undented but increasing interest in hydrogen
  3. Zero Carbon Hotels 
  4. Responsible Tourism Conference and Summer School Finland June 2022
  5. Maya Beach in Thailand is open again for tourism 
  6. RT Developments in the Scottish Islands
  7. Increasing demand for mountain rescue in the Lake District.
  8. Cruise - protest & partnership
  9.  Virtual Volunteering through people & places
  10. Miscellany

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The 2022 WTM Global  Responsible Tourism Awards are open for entries,  destinations and businesses can enter, and you can nominate others on the WTM global hub.  

2022 RT Events
April 11-13 WTM Africa, Cape Town The WTM Africa Awards and panel discussions 
June 5-12  Responsible Tourism  Summer School, Finland  Jyväskylä, Central Finland & Helsinki
The 15th International Conference on Responsible Tourism takes place June 9-10   Advancing Responsible Tourism

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

1.  Climate Change and Covid in 2022 - who bears the cost?
As I write this introduction to RT News, Nadim Zahawi the UK's former vaccines minister has told the BBC that the country was on the road "from pandemic to endemic" and that cutting the isolation period for those with Covid from 7 to 5 days would help with staff absence.  This morning too, Gordon Rayner, an Associate Editor at the Daily Telegraph, a Tory party supporting paper, wrote "Legitimate questions are now being asked about why Britain was so dismissive of the evidence from South Africa, and whether Government scientific advisers are once again using fear as a method of control."  Rayner points out that Angelique Coetzee, chairman of the South African Medical Association was the first doctor to raise the alarm over a possible new variant. She "reported that omicron caused “very, very mild” symptoms compared with delta, and hypothesised that it “could potentially be of great help to us” by replacing the more dangerous delta variant and helping the population to reach herd immunity at minimal cost to life. She says she was “astonished” at the panicked response to it in the UK.  More: why we must listen to South African scientists on omicron.Rayner asked: "Does Dr Coetzee think xenophobia has played a role in Britain’s dismissal of her advice? He reports her reply: “No – but I think there was arrogance from the politicians in the UK. Also, Boris Johnson was going through a bad time because of the criticism of his Christmas parties, so maybe there was a political reason for all this."  I heard  from a small inbound operator in South Africa: "The arrogance of the UK Government/Boris Johnson (to divert attention from his misdemeanours?) and punish SA by putting us on a Red List at the commencement of the Christmas holiday period (that had repercussions all over the world) has cost our company alone at least R2.2m [141,,000USD¦£104,000¦€124,000] in turnover and completely stalled our recovery." Throughout the pandemic, countries have pursued narrow national interests at the expense of the common good.

Both Covid and Climate Change require a global response, despite the World Health Organization  frequently and consistently reminding us that  “No one is safe from Covid-19 until everyone is safe.” Nation-states have been slow to ensure that the developing world gets the vaccines that it needs, our failure to act on the evidence that the virus will mutate and return unless vaccines are globally available is another example of the tragedy of the commons. Similarly, national governments have so far failed to provide the funds to enable all countries to reduce emissions and adapt to climate change. There is more here: What does Covid teach us about Climate Change?  "Covid and climate change require a global response – neither can be effectively dealt with only at the nation-state level. Covid and climate change are global-commons issues, the jury is still out on whether we can rise to the challenge."


2. Aviation - carbon emissions curve undented but increasing interest in hydrogen
In the UK omicron is now dominant, it is more infectious but less life-threatening. Restrictions for international travel have now been eased, with the UK government dropping the need for pre-departure Coronavirus PCR tests for double-vaccinated passengers arriving in England and demand is bouncing back at least in the UK. 
Hopefully, omicron will remain dominant, although until a much, much larger proportion of the global population has been vaccinated there remains the risk that a dangerous mutation will replace omicron. Covid has understandably distracted attention from climate change and the outcome of COP26. The issue of ghost or fantom flights is being raised, flights flown simply to keep their slots.
Greenhouse gases are still accumulating in our atmosphere as a group of climate scientists have asked after three decades of climate mitigation, “Why Haven’t We Bent the Global Emissions Curve?”  In a paper published in Environment Research Letters, Klower et al modelled the CO2 and non-CO2 effects like nitrogen oxide emissions and contrail formation to analyse aviation's total warming footprint. They conclude that aviation contributed approximately 4% to observed human-induced global warming to date, and is "projected to cause a total of about 0.1 °C of warming by 2050, half of it to date and the other half over the next three decades, should aviation's pre-COVID growth resume. The industry would then contribute a 6%–17% share to the remaining 0.3 °C–0.8 °C to not exceed 1.5 °C–2 °C of global warming. "

As the graph shows we have gone on polluting our atmosphere and warming our planet. Short and medium-range flights generate two-thirds of current aircraft emissions. There are some grounds for optimism:

3. Zero Carbon Hotels 

Greenview, working in partnership with 20 hotels and the  Sustainable Hospitality Alliance, the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA),and the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC). "“The methodology is not only for those in the hotel sector wishing to set a net zero pathway, but also aims to provide additional insights for the wider climate change and net zero community so that the specific challenges and opportunities faced by hotels can be better understood. Furthermore, as hotel stays are included in Scope 3 Business Travel for companies in all sectors wishing to achieve net-zero, this methodology aims to provide a consistent approach to net-zero for hotels which will support these ambitions.” The methodology is freely available and can be downloaded here. 

The Building Construction and Design magazine reported the arrival of the world's first net-zero carbon hotel, room 2 Chiswick,  "built with pioneering technologies to achieve net-zero throughout both the design and construction stages, as well as throughout its whole life, including both embodied and operation emissions, which the company claims is an industry first."  "The hotel will use onsite renewables to convert 100% of its energy needs for heating, cooling, and hot water. A proprietary intelligent building and reporting system will improve performance across the sum of incremental gains. Two “lab rooms” will provide data on energy, water use, and air quality, along with studying and learning from guest behaviors." more

There is more detail on the room2 Chiswick website:  "100% of our loose bespoke furniture is manufactured within 10 miles, using only natural, recycled, or reclaimed materials and FSC certified wood. 4,462 trees were planted to offset the carbon of all the furniture in the hometel. ... Under the 'Green' roof, is a 'Blue' roof. It catches and retains up to 50,000L of rainwater, slowly releasing it to the drainage system to reduce the chances of local flooding."  The hometel is littered with many more Arts and Crafts design elements.


4. Responsible Tourism Conference and Summer School Finland June 2022
We start in Jyväskylä, Central Finland, where we highlight issues in rural surroundings and responsibility, especially in the Lakeland region. We discuss overtourism and cruising issues in the Responsible Tourism in Destinations Conference, which is the second part of the summer school programme. The Summer School programme ends in Helsinki (awarded European Capital of Smart Tourism 2019) and focus on urban tourism and responsibility. We visit the Fortress of Suomenlinna Sea Fortress, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Here you will have a unique chance to do fieldwork based on the pre-assignment. We also visit Helsinki’s new Central Library Oodi, which is a living meeting place for both local people and tourists. Oodi was chosen as the best new public library in the world in 2019. The Conference can be booked separately. more


5. Maya Beach in Thailand is open again for tourism 
In 2018 Maya Beach, 15 m wide and 250 m long, was closed by the Thai government after it fell victim to overtourism and consequent damage to littering, anchor damage to coral, trampled flora and disturbed fauna. Yuthasak Supasorn, the governor of the Tourism Authority of Thailand, told Reuters, "The sharks have come back, coral reefs are regrowing, and the water is clear again." Only 375 visitors will be allowed to visit at a time and swimming remains prohibited and boat docking is restricted to a designated area at the back of the bay.  more


6. RT Developments in the Scottish Islands
Isle20 is a certified social enterprise supporting businesses in the Scottish islands, in 18 months they have grown to list 575 businesses on 32 islands, with a business directory and an e-commerce platform. They have announced that they are planning to launch isleHoliday.  An alternative booking platform to Airbnb. Commission will run the platform but the surplus will go into the Isle Develop fund. "That fund will be focussed on supporting small businesses and community and housing projects in the Scottish islands. We want to make sure that the islands remain a great place to live and work as well as a great place to visit. Their standard commission is 12%, and 10% for island residents.  More reported in The Scotsman.


7. Increased demand for mountain rescue in the Lake District.
Richard Warren, chairman of the Lake District Search and Mountain Rescue Association reported that volunteers were called out 680 times in 2021 with an "absolutely chaotic" Christmas week during which there were 11 rescues. Wasdale Mountain Rescue Team put in 45 hours during the Christmas week. Lake District mountain rescue teams were called out 680 times in 2021, a consequence of increased domestic tourism with people venturing into mountains with no experience and inadequate preparation: Warren pointed out that "A lot of rescues are avoidable because people get lost with no map, compass or torch" In the UK Mountain Rescue is provided by unpaid volunteers and supported by donations, it costs £750,000 a year to equip and maintain the teams in Cumbria alone. more


8. Cruise - protest & partnership
In November 2020 voters in Key West passed three referendums limiting cruise ship visitors to 1,500 per day, banning ships with 1,300 passengers or more from disembarking passengers and prioritising cruise lines with the best environmental and health records."Less than eight months later, with financial backing from the cruise line industry and at the urging of Key West business owners whose tourist-heavy economy relies on visitors, those referendums were overturned by state lawmakers." There have been no cruise ships for 20 months because of the pandemic. On 9 December 200 protesters from ‘Safer Cleaner Ships,’ greeted Norwegian Dawn, others welcomed the ship to port. more
Ambassador Crusie Line has partnered with the marine conservation charity ORCA, deploying their commercial weight to assist the charity and launching an anti-whaling campaign - " the new partnership will also see Ocean Conservationists joining Ambassador’s ship, Ambience, in 2022 and 2023 to deliver unforgettable wildlife experiences to guests onboard. more


9. Virtual Volunteering through people & places 
people & places was recognised in the Responsible Tourism Awards at WTM in November as One to Watch. When the pandemic struck, people & places was no longer able to send volunteers to support the projects they have partnered with, providing skills transfer. Following a period of experimentation using Zoom and other platforms, people & places developed with their established partners an e-volunteering programme providing professional skills transfer, English language support, technical skills in gardening, science experiments and IT training. In their review of the year published in December, Dianne Ashman, reports on what their virtual volunteers have achieved despite the pandemic.

10. Miscellany

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of February 
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

 

The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD

WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 5,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold@haroldgoodwin.info 

RT News: Latest Developments in Responsible Tourism 11/ 2021

  1. COP26 – aviation off the hook again?
  2. The WTM World Responsible Tourism Awards

    One tonne of carbon

  3. Covid, a catalyst for innovation?
  4. Responsible Tourism in Scotland
  5. Booking.com promote sustainable businesses
  6. easyJet promoting destination stewardship
  7. National parks & indigenous rights
  8. Snowdonia communities 'exploited'
  9. Responsible Tourism in India, Kerala
  10. Miscellany

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
2022 RT Events
June 5-12  Responsible Tourism  Summer School, Finland  Jyväskylä, Central Finland & Helsinki
The 15th International Conference on Responsible Tourism takes place June 9-10   Advancing Responsible Tourism

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The next edition of RT News will be out at the beginning of January
The Responsible Tourism Hub provides quick links to curated material on Responsible Tourism.
Subscribe to RT News here  You can update or amend your mailing preference at the foot of the email which delivers RT News to you.
There is s new affiliated School for Responsible Tourism 

1 COP26 – aviation off the hook again?
If aviation were a country, it would be the sixth-largest emitter falling between Russia and Japan, responsible for 3.5% of global emissions. The aviation industry has a strong sense of its importance, forgetting that the vast majority of the world’s population never flies. In March 2020, the respected German consultancy Roland Berger forecast that if other industries decarbonise in line with current projections, aviation could account for up to 24% of global emissions by 2050 unless there is a significant technological shift. It is implausible that this would be acceptable with the world experiencing the catastrophic impacts of climate change. Domestic and international aviation emissions are the Achilles’ heel of the tourism industry.

The travel and tourism industry needs to push the aviation sector to change more rapidly. There are major issues with all three parts of the ICAO strategy: Carbon Offsetting; SAF: Sustainable Aviation Fuels & Net-Zero

In January, the Fuelling Flight Project  —  which includes easyJet, IAG, KLM and AirFrance — pointed to “the risk of massive capital investments in things that increase emissions, compared to fossil fuels and/or that become stranded assets”. As Bloomberg reported on 10 November: “SAF is typically three to four times more expensive than kerosene, so airlines aren’t buying it in bulk. As a result, very little is being produced. If Delta Air Lines Inc. filled all its planes for one day, the carrier would soak up a year’s worth of U.S. SAF supply,” said CEO Ed Bastian.  Current production is estimated to be 0.1% of global jet fuel consumption.

Business as usual does not meet the need for change. COP26 made no progress on aviation. 

Delay only exacerbates the problem. It may well be necessary to think the unthinkable and cap airline operations.  more


2 The WTM World Responsible Tourism Awards
With the launch of the Global Awards this year, chosen by an international panel of judges from amongst the regional Gold Awards, the programme has come of age. Four of the six Global Awards went to India, one went to South Africa and another one to the Maldives.
The six 2021 Global Responsible Tourism Awards winners are listed here with the judges' reasons.
1. Decarbonising Travel & Tourism: Govardhan Ecovillage, Maharashtra, INDIA
2. Sustaining Employees and Communities through the Pandemic: V&A Waterfront, Cape Town, South Africa, AFRICA
3. Destinations Building Back Better Post-Covid: Madhya Pradesh Tourism Board, Rural Tourism Programme, INDIA
4. Increasing Diversity in Tourism: How Inclusive is our Industry? No Footprints. Mumbai, INDIA
5. Reducing Plastic Waste in the Environment: Six Senses, Laamu, Maldives, INDIAN OCEAN
6. Growing the Local Economic Benefit: Village Ways, Mumbai, Maharashtra, INDIA

The 2021 Indian Responsible Tourism Awards Winners with the judges’ reasons can be found here.
The judges’ reasons for the 2021 Rest of the World Responsible Tourism Awards Winners can be found here.

There will be ten categories for the 2022 Awards, they can be found here.


3  Covid, a catalyst for innovation?

Caroline Bremner, Euromonitor International, published Travel Rewired: Innovation Strategies for a Resilient Recovery at WTM, London. Amongst the key findings.

The Sustainable Hospitality Alliance, with hospitality companies comprising 30% of the industry, has launched a Pathway to Net Positive Hospitality for the planet. “Look beyond ‘zero’ impact towards a lasting ‘positive’ impact”   "Our Pathway recognises the significant work that’s being done by many partner organisations to support the industry. Our aim is to coordinate and build on these to create a holistic, action-based approach that’s applicable for all hotels, regardless of whether they are part of a large international brand or independent.
New French Tourism Plan: "The government wants France to once again become the most visited country in the world."  The initiative is creating debate.


4  Responsible Tourism in Scotland

In March this year VisitScotland launched a campaign to raise awareness of the importance of exploring Scotland’s countryside with respect to protect and enjoy it and to keep Scotland special. The campaign used the ecotourism slogan, take only photographs leave only footprints – ‘Enjoy it Responsibly,’ Initially the campaign was focused on visitor behaviour, not surprising given the overtourism issues which affected many of Scotland’s rural communities and natural areas with the associated problems of litter, wild camping and wild toileting.
Visit Scotland’s corporate website provides campaign material for businesses to use to encourage a visitor to make a Responsible Tourism Promise, promising to care for Scotland’s nature and communities and “to care for Scotland and the world’s tomorrow.” There is detailed guidance for visitors on responsible motorhome and caravan and camping trips. More recently the campaign has moved on with the development of responsible itineraries  
Chris Greenwood, VisitScotland’s Senior Insight Manager, argues that Scotland’s tourism businesses should take the lead and direct visitors towards better choices.“It’s up to the industry to demonstrate their values and what they are doing to support responsible tourism" and suggested that holiday accommodation providers could guide guests towards better choices by advising on local scheduled buses which travel through particularly scenic areas, providing bicycles and walking itineraries. "People want to do the right thing and are looking for support to make these choices.”
Vicki Miller, Director of Marketing & Digital, VisitScotland reports that  “Visitors from around the world are looking for responsible travel solutions and we need to ensure that these options in Scotland enhance the visitor’s trip, through creating enriching and memorable experiences in a sustainable way.”  more
The Scottish Government is funding a digital sales tool which allows visitors to ‘pay it forward’, Scotland’s first portal for booking agri-tourism farm experiences across Scotland, an interactive food to fork map in Dumfries and Galloway, a visitor management tool to facilitate safe and sustainable tourism on the Isle of Skye and the creation of a community calculator measuring business impacts. more


5 Booking.com promotes sustainable businesses
Booking.com is encouraging businesses using its platform to select from sustainability practices to communicate directly to consumers. "Travel Sustainable partners achieve increased visibility across our platform so customers can easily make sustainable travel choices." more  Booking.com has identified "a set of the most impactful practices for a property to consider in five key areas: waste, energy and greenhouse gases, water, supporting local communities and protecting nature. This foundational framework is currently further broken down into 32 specific sustainability measures or practices that properties can implement, including everything from eliminating single-use plastic toiletries or switching to LED light fixtures to running on 100% renewable energy sources or investing a certain percentage of profits into local community and conservation projects."
" Booking.com has also worked with reputable sustainability consultancy Sustainalize to develop a robust methodology that assesses these practices’ relative weight in the model. As these weights fully depend on the environmental and/or social impact of the practices, the model is fit for purpose to identify partners that pursue meaningful sustainability efforts. The calculation also considers the property’s location and accounts for its size, improving the model’s accuracy and applicability among the large variety of Booking.com’s partners. All these calculations come together, with each practice being weighted accordingly and taking local factors into account, to create an overall score for the property’s sustainability practices." more

This is groundbreaking in two ways:


6 easyJet promoting destination stewardship
easyJet Holidays is embarking on a Destination Stewardship programme to bring together private, public and local community representatives to establish a common set of priorities for tourism management and long-term resilience post-COVID-19 pandemic. In an approach to put community first there are plans to the programme in Tenerife and Mallorca (Spain); Dalaman (Turkey); Rhodes (Greece); and The Algarve (Portugal) to develop more balanced and equitable outcomes.

Garry Wilson, CEO of easyJet holidays, said: “At easyJet holidays we have ambitious sustainability commitments combined with an opportunity to do things differently. There is a responsibility for us all to play our part to reopen tourism sustainably and we absolutely need to, and can, work together. So one of the biggest challenges is going to be how we can share best practice, collaborate, and make changes as an industry. We see the Travel Foundation as the ideal partner for facilitating this within destinations, and we share the same aim to lead the charge here and demonstrate a new kind of relationship between businesses and destination communities. Ultimately, we’ll show that doing this right will deliver a better experience for our customers and real, positive benefits for communities.”  more


7 National parks & indigenous rights
Criticism of the practice of "fortress conservation", where indigenous people are evicted or excluded from national parks,  has come to the fore in the context of the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework, In July 2022th e U.N. Biodiversity Conference, COP15, will meet in Kunming, China to discuss proposal  “30 by 30” — a plan to conserve 30% of Earth’s land and sea areas by 2030 through “area-based conservation.  measures”.  During a Protecting Human Rights in International Conservation hearing by US House Natural Resources Committee heard serious criticism of WWF and other international NGOs funding new national parks. Participants in the world’s first Congress to decolonize conservation have released a manifesto calling for a total halt to new Protected Areas which exclude Indigenous and local communities. The “Marseille Manifesto: a people’s manifesto for the future of conservation” was launched in October. 


8 Snowdonia communities 'exploited'
Gwynedd council in Wales has reported that communities in Snowdonia have been left feeling "exploited" after one of the busiest tourist seasons in living memory after more than 660,000 visitors climbed Snowdon in 2021. Gwynedd council believes that Snowdonia, a National Park, has joined Barcelona and Amsterdam with more visitors that they can cope with.
Council leader Dyfrig Siencyn said ""We've experienced two years of very unusual tourist seasons, from lockdown to a very large influx of new tourists - those people who would probably have gone overseas for their holidays," "And it increased the pressure on our communities substantially. "It was very good for businesses and our local economy, but we also had a new kind of tourist, who really didn't understand the communities that we live in, or the environment." There were problems with litter, parking while the cost of repairing footpaths "can't be sustained in the long term". "Some people can travel to Snowdon, climb up the mountain, make a mess and then go home without contributing anything to the local economy. "What we need to do is to look at ways we can make tourism benefit our communities rather than exploiting them."
Volunteers from the Snowdonia Society have spent thousands of hours over the summer picking up litter.more


9. Responsible Tourism in India, Kerala
Kerala Tourism launches STREET project for experiential tourism, STREET is an acronym for Sustainable, Tangible, Responsible, Experiential, Ethnic, Tourism hubs. Green street, cultural street, village life experience street, experiential tourism street, agri-tourism street, water street and art street are the themes that have been planned as part of the project which celebrates the particularities of communities. more
A culinary tourism experiment is part of an effort to give a slice of the traditional taste of the state to visiting guests received another major push with the state tourism department introducing ‘Foodie Wheels’ in select locations. more
Kerala has launched a Responsible Tourism (RT) Classification for hotels and resorts, giving an added thrust to environmental protection and ecological-restoration through tourism. The accreditation system is to be extended to homestays, service villas, Ayurveda centres & resorts, Adventure Tourism service providers, amusement parks, heritage homes conservation project Grihastali and license for tour guides will be available online. more & here
Kumarakom village in Kottayam district of Kerala is now transforming itself into a ‘Workation tourism' destination. 23 resorts and hotels have arranged facilities for guests to work with high-speed internet and office rooms.


10. Miscellany
Experience Ancient Olympia as it was 2,000 years ago using AI and AR
‘The campervan broke my heart.’ Lockdown purchases we wish we’d never made a hidden pandemic of buyer’s remorse is sweeping undetected through Irish homes
SARAWAK’S tourism industry players have taken a Responsible Tourism pledge to reduce their environmental footprint, support local communities and protect culture and heritage.
CLIA ocean-going cruise members have committed to reaching net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. CLIA member cruise lines have also committed to a 40 per cent reduction in the rate of carbon emissions across the global fleet by 2030. more
Under the Clean Gilgit and Hunza Project, Nestle Pakistan recently installed benches and waste bins made from 100% recycled plastic, in Hunza.
Soneva has launched a project to restore coral reef and create a knowledge “hub” for the Maldives.
The Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau is trying a new program, Malama Hawaii which provides incentives for tourists to volunteer. Malama Hawaii has more than 90 participating partners “It’s a really great way for visitors to connect with the kamaaina and the aina here and really give back and have a rich cultural experience doing a variety of things, whether that’s volunteering at an animal farm or volunteering in the loi,”  more


The URL www.rtp.education takes you directly to the RT Hub, which provides easy links to Responsible Tourism on the WTM websites and RT Partnership.

Sponsored by @WTM_WRTD

WTM Monthly RT Newsletter

RT News Video Channel

 

 

 

 

Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

GreenAir
The Sustainabilist UAE
Responsible Cape Town
Climate Change in 7 charts

Responsible Traveller, South Africa
Encounter Africa

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

WTM Responsible Tourism Blog

Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right if you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have recently subscribed online. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News, please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries, please email harold