Responsible Tourism Developments July 2019

  1. World Responsible Tourism & Latin American Awards
  2. Aviation and Climate Change
  3. WTM, London November 4-6 - programme
  4. Overtourism - Italian cities take action
  5. Inclusive and Pro-Poor Tourism
  6. Consumer Education, Responsible Tourism resources required
  7. Airbnb - regulation
  8. One Planet Network
  9. Plastic: Going Beyond Straws
  10. Cuba - Americans can still travel there
https://metro.co.uk/2019/06/18/much-warmer-greenland-ice-fields-vanished-9993980/
  1. World Responsible Tourism Awards and Latin American Awards
    Entries for the prestigious World Responsible Tourism Awards close on 31st July - the judges can only award from amongst those that apply if you want to be amongst the winners at WTM London on November 6th, or if you know businesses, destination or organisation which should be recognised apply or nominate here.
    Best for Wildlife & Nature Conservation
    Best for Reducing Carbon & Other Greenhouse Gases
    Best for Transparent Reporting
    Best for Reducing Plastic Waste
    Best for Coping with Success at Crowded Sites
    Best for Benefiting Local People
    All categories apply or nominate here.

    The WTM Latin America Responsible Tourism Awards have just been announced
    Best for Poverty Reduction and Inclusion
    Best Contribution to Wildlife Conservation
    Best Cultural Heritage Attraction
    Best Destination for Responsible Tourism
    Enter here

2. Aviation and Climate Change
Images of Huskies running on water, melted water on top of the ice went viral this month. There is mounting awareness of global warming. BP calculates that global demand for energy grew by 2.9% last year – the biggest rise since 2010 – and that a significant factor in this was the number of much colder and hotter days than normal, which led to a greater use of air conditioners, fans and heaters,  carbon emissions rose by 2% – faster than in any year since 2011, and roughly the carbon equivalent of having 400 million more cars on the roads. Spencer Dale, the company’s chief economist, warned of a “worrying vicious cycle: increasing levels of carbon emissions leading to more extreme weather patterns, which in turn trigger stronger growth in energy and carbon emissions”.  More

Professor Kevin Anderson has pointed out that " The scale of anticipated aviation emissions is such that this single sector will consume around one-third of the UK’s Paris-compliant carbon budget, putting still further mitigation pressures on schools, hospitals and businesses to compensate for this privileged sector.” And it is not just aviation
Sustainable transport group Transport & Environment reveals that Carnival Corporation, the world’s largest luxury cruise operator, emitted nearly 10 times more sulphur oxide (SOX) around European coasts than did all 260 million European cars in 2017. More

There was some good news in June, New York City has declared a climate emergency. EU finance ministers are pushing for a new environmental tax on flying.

3. WTM, London November 4-6 - programme
At WTM the Responsible Tourism agenda is shifting its focus, we shall continue to raise the issues, but we shall focus more on the solutions. So in November at WTM London, we shall have a panel looking at the best practices in reporting on the issues businesses are taking responsibility for and the impact of their efforts. We shall have three case studies showcasing best practice in managing crowded sites to protect the heritage and ensure a good visitor experience. We are looking too at solutions to the challenges of visitor and water security. More on November's programme.

The child protection agenda has moved on. Although there is still a great deal of work to be done to drive out child abuse and trafficking, our focus this year is on the practical alternatives, for the tourism sector, to working with orphanages. While there are laggards still risking, encouraging and supporting child trafficking and the abuse of children through their support of orphanages through visits, all responsible businesses are looking for responsible alternatives. Holidaymakers and volunteers are drawn to support children – how can we best enable them to realise their moral imperative? We’ll have some answers at WTM London in November. Alternative Care Thailand is offering alternatives to orphanages.

4. Over Tourism - Italian cities take action
In Venice, the MSC Opera cruise ship rammed the dock and a tourist riverboat on June 2nd More

Italy's transport minister responded by saying that cruise ships should no longer be allowed to pass down the Giudecca. More and More

https://youtu.be/JlhGya442IU

In Rome, new regulations have been introduced restricting pub crawls, alcohol consumption and bathing in certain public areas. Sanctions include fines, as well as the individual being banned from areas for up to 48 hours, known as the application of the “Daspo Urbano”. Rome’s Mayor, Virginia Raggi, released a Facebook post saying the changes would “ensure greater safety for citizens and tourists who live in the city at night.” more

5. Inclusive and Pro-Poor Tourism
The Kerala Responsible Tourism Network has launched a website offering a wide variety of indigenous handicrafts, souvenirs, traditional attires, home décor, jewellery etc. that reflects the identity of Kerala enabling people to buy online. The offer includes perishable food products which can be delivered in parts of Kerala. More 800 coconut thatch-making units registered under the State’s Responsible Tourism (RT) Mission are on track to sell 2,00,000 lakhs at Rp 14 each, significant income for largely rural women in the backwaters.
Supported by the World Bank, Uttar Pradesh has launched a creative economies programme to provides opportunities for young local entrepreneurs working in traditional and contemporary industries around tourism-rich areas to use their talents for commercial pursuits.More

6. Consumer Education, Responsible Tourism resources required
It can be surprisingly difficult for consumers to get reliable information about how to travel responsibly. At WTM London in November we shall launch an online directory of resources - if you have reources you would like us to connect to or if you have resources you would like to contribute then pleases get in touch. harold@haroldgoodwin.info

7. Airbnb
Ten European cities - Amsterdam, Barcelona, ​​Berlin, Bordeaux, Brussels, Krakow, Munich, Paris, Valencia and Vienna - have written to the European Commission demanding more help in countering the negative impacts of holiday rental platforms like Airbnb. The European Court of Justice recently ruled in a non-binding opinion that Airbnb is a digital platform rather than a real estate agent. If the opinion stands then the platforms would be relieved of any responsibility to ensure that landlords comply with local rules aimed at regulating holiday lets. More

Airbnb has launched “Airbnb Luxe”, with a portfolio of 2,000 upmarket rentals worldwide. Research by Inside Airbnb, suggests that in Ireland around 4,978 ‘entire homes’ on the platform appear to have been rented out for more than 90 days – a good indicator that the host is not living in the property and one that will be used in the new legislation to label such a let as a commercial venture. More From July 1st only properties with planning permission will be legally available for short term lets, penalties up to a €5,000 fine or six months jail. More

8. One Planet Network
The One Planet Network has published its annual magazine with examples of initiatives making real progress towards sustainable consumption and production. They showcase an initiative to reduce food waste in Seychelles and My Green Butler which "provides an integrated digital sustainable hospitality management system which persuades guests to reduce waste through an enjoyable, interactive process that simultaneously increases customer satisfaction. The initiative provides training for hospitality staff to improve guest engagement by empowering them to save resources with the help of customized data and innovative technology." More

9. Plastic: Going Beyond Straws

The problem is not plastic, the problem is waste plastic.  At this year’s WTM London in November, we are keen to showcase a range of practical solutions for reducing plastic waste. We are keen to have low, intermediate and high-tech examples to show, we want to encourage the use of the emerging technologies and share good practice. If you have suggestions, please email harold@haroldgoodwin.info

10. Cuba - Americans can still travel there

Conde Nast Traveller has published advice for Americans about how to plan a "Support for the Cuban People" trip in the wake of the US government banning cruise ships and "people to people" tour groups. US citizens can still travel if they stay in privately owned homes (casa particulares) rather than government-owned hotels, visiting Cuban-owned businesses, and having a “full schedule” of activities that put travellers in contact with locals.  More

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Responsible Tourism Developments March 2019

  1. World Responsible Tourism Awards Open
  2. WTM Africa
  3. Greenhouse Gas Emission cause Toxic Air
  4. EasyJet lowest carbon emissions airline
  5. WTM Latin America
  6. TUI have launched Plastic Reduction Guidelines for Hotels
  7. Arabian Travel Mart
  8. Cultural Responses to Overtourism in Europe
  9. The Invisible Burden
  10. WTM Responsible Tourism Linked In Page

1.World Responsible Tourism Awards Open
The 2019 World Responsible Tourism Awards open on April 2nd, the categories were announced this month. The judges can only choose from amongst those that apply. So if you know travel and tourism businesses, destinations and organisations who you think could win please encourage them to apply and offer to provide a reference.

This year we are looking for

  • innovative examples of tourism businesses that have made a demonstrable and significant difference locally to Wildlife and Nature Conservation, initiatives which we hope will inspire and encourage others.
  • examples of initiatives which have developed practical means of reducing Carbon and other Greenhouse Gas Emissions in any part of the tourism industry.
  • in Benefiting Local People: we are looking for those making particular efforts to benefit neighbouring communities, by providing social, economic or environmental benefits to the community, through training and progression or working with local people to create a local supply of goods or services for purchase by the tourism business or tourists. 
  • examples of Transparent Reporting:  businesses and certification schemes where the impact of the initiatives taken to reduce negative and increase positive impacts are communicated to guests, travellers and stakeholders.
  • innovative examples of initiatives which have Reduced Plastic Waste and which can be applied in the tourism sector by reducing the use of single-use plastics within a destination.
  • Best for Coping with Success, (aka  Overtourism) we are looking for examples of attractions and sites where management interventions have reduced the negative impacts on the site and neighbouring communities and improved the visitor experience.

To apply or nominate go to link


2. WTM Africa
In Cape Town at WTM Africa, there are sessions on wildlife conservation and decarbonisation of travel and tourism and four sessions on the business cases for RT. Previous Award winners and those who have won this year will be talking about why they take responsibility, about why it makes business sense for them and about the impacts of the initiatives they take; impacts on their bottom line and on people and places. The WTM Africa Responsible Tourism Awards are presented on Wednesday 10th April, more
Meet at the Responsible Tourism stand G18

The Radisson Park Inn in Cape Town has a unique solar technology which combines generation of thermal energy with the photovoltaic generation of electricity which produces one of the highest energy yields ever measured. When compared to traditional solar panels, it produces both electricity and hot water output up to 70°C and delivers three times more energy on the same surface area. As part of the Responsible Tourism programme at WTM Africa, there is an opportunity to see this technology in action. link

3. Greenhouse Gas Emission cause Toxic Air
Cities around the world are grappling with air pollution but Ulambatur the capital of Mongolia is suffering from some of the worst. Toxic air kills. more

As we reported last month climate strikes are spreading around the world as school children become increasingly aware of climate change and fearful of the consequences. more

4. EasyJet lowest carbon emissions airline
The London School of Economics has produced a report backed by a group of institutional investors, the Environment Agency Pension Fund, on aircraft emissions. EasyJet's aircraft are expected to be emitting 75g of CO2 per passenger km by 2020, compared with 172g for Korean Air. International Airlines Group (IAG), which includes British Airways, is expected to emit 112g. The report suggests that by 2020 its emissions per passenger kilometre will be less than half that of some rivals. more

5. WTM Latin America
At WTM Latin America they will be launching the Responsible Tourism Awards part of the family or World Responsible Tourism Awards and operating with the same rigour and standards. There is a panel addressing the next developments in certification, more transparency in Certification Plus? The third panel focuses on how the industry can reduce its reliance on carbon and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

6. TUI have launched Plastic Reduction Guidelines for Hotels
The guidelines explain the different kinds of plastic, what needs to be done in different departments, identifies best practice, gives guidance on managing plastic using the 4Rs and a useful guide to references and further reading. more

7. Arabian Travel Mart
This year there are three Responsible Tourism panels on How can Travel and Tourism best reduce the carbon emissions of our industry?
Raising Awareness of Sustainability and we ask if Tourism Broadens the Mind: Can We Do More?

8. Cultural Responses to Overtourism in Europe
Dr Guillem Colom-Montero and Professor Ulrike Zitzlsperger at the University of Exeter are organising a workshop on 18th June focused on the creative literary, cinematic and artistic responses to overtourism. Details

9. The Invisible Burden
The Travel Foundation has commissioned a report with an infographic listing some of the kinds of pollution which can be caused by tourism: energy & greenhouse gases, water, sewage and solid waste, biodiversity and the local economy. more

10. WTM Responsible Tourism Linked in Page
World Travel Market has launched a LinkedIn Responsible Tourism page - use it if you find it useful. Link

 

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Responsible Tourism Developments February 2019

  1. School Children Strike Over Climate Change
  2. Further Evidence that Travellers have Ethics
  3. Human Rights in Tourism
  4. How to Spot a Real Animal Sanctuary
  5. Responsible Tourism at WTM Latin America
  6. Responsible Tourism Awards
  7. Peace Tourism
  8. Burning Man Festival - Gentrified
  9. Sex Works are NOT Tourist Attractions
  10. Solutions to Overtourism
  1. School Children Strike Over Climate Change

In August last a Swedish fifteen year old went on strike sitting quietly on the cobblestones outside parliament in central Stockholm, handing out leaflets that declare: “I am doing this because you adults are shitting on my future.” more in The Guardian

In February tens of thousands of school children left their classrooms to demand that governments take urgent action to tackle climate change.

15,000 British schoolchildren walked out of school to Parliament Square - the often derided "snowflake" generation marching to demand action on what they perceive as an existential threat. more Some have attacked them. As George Monbiot has pointed out " Greta Thunberg, whose school strike sparked this movement, has written a response far more dignified and mature than the articles attacking her in publications like the Spectator.

"If the government is serious about winning over the next generation of voters, then they need to heed their most pressing concerns," said Richard Baker, from Christian Aid. "But more importantly they are sparking a national debate, they are forcing teachers, parents and politicians to re-evaluate the issue of climate breakdown and, what is most important, while lifting our gaze beyond just immediate short-term national concerns." moreThere is more here on the WTM Blog.

2. Further Evidence that Travellers have Ethics.

Back in October 2018 Intrepid Travel launched tours focused on the 18 to 29 year-olds, having surveyed the demographic and their ethical/sustainable aspirations. New research on US travellers by One Poll funded by Exodus Travels found that a wide range of activities cause travellers to feel guilty when they reflcet on them, inculding riding on elephants (18 percent), swimming with dolphins (19 percent) and posing for photographs with captive wildlife (21 percent). 78 percent consider themselves to be more ethically-conscious travelers than they were a decade ago. Seventy percent report often researching a company’s ethical tourism policy before signing up for a tour. more

3. Human Rights in Tourism
The Roundtable on Human Rights in Tourism has launched a Get Started tool to help identify human rights risks and integrate measures to protect human rights into operations and along the value chain. more

4. How to Spot a Real Animal Sanctuary
PETA has published some clear advice on how to spot, before visiting, those businesses which are "now marketing their animal prisons as “sanctuaries” or “rescues” and claiming to support species conservation in order to attract customers."

5. Responsible Tourism at WTM Latin America
There are 4 Responsible Tourism sessions at WTM Lat 2-4 April in Sao Paulo.

  • The Launch of Latin American Responsible Tourism Awards.
  • Where next with Certification?
  • How can we best reduce the carbon emissions of our industry?

6. Responsible Tourism Awards
The International Travel and Tourism Awards have just been launched for 2019. They include one Responsible Tourism Award,  for the best initiative to reduce carbon emissions by a hospitality, transport or tourism business or destination.
The World Responsible Tourism Awards launch on March 19th.

7. Peace Tourism
Jiyin Cao of Northwestern University has published research which shows:
“Across five studies, using different research methods including a longitudinal study, ... that breadth but not the depth of foreign experiences increases generalized trust,” ... In other words, the more countries one travels, the more trusting one is. Breadth is important here, because breadth provides a great level of diversity in people’s foreign travel experiences, allowing them to reach such a generalized assumption.” more

8. Burning Man Festival - Gentrified
There is mounting concern about the growing "commodification and exploitation of Black Rock City and Burning Man culture".
Burning Man CEO Marian Goodell has taken the unprecedented step of withdrawing invitations to one turnkey camp - "Humano the Tribe" - and warning dozens of others. more

9. Sex Works are NOT Tourist Attractions
The new mayor of Amsterdam has criticised visitors who flock to its red-light district for treating prostitutes like a tourist attraction, calling their treatment “unpalatable” and “humiliating” . more

10. Solutions to Overtourism
In southern Thailand, Mya Bay on the island of Phi Phi Leh starred in The Baech released in 2000. Mya Beach was quickly added to the bucket list and numbers soared, in 2016 Chinese tourists also arrived in large numbers.
In peak tourist season this 300 metres of shoreline was hit 3,500 visitors a day. More parade than paradise condemned as "filthy" and "disgusting". and there has been major damage to the coral reef. The authorities have now closed the beach, more

There is work in progress on the Responsible Tourism Partnership on solutions to overtourism, pages are being created to enable the easy sharing of experience in managing overtourism and avoiding it. There is a typology of approaches which provides an index and wherever possible a link to where further information can be found and where possible a contact.

If you have strategies or methods which you would like to see included here please email harold@haroldgoodwin.info Your contribution will be acknowledged.

 

 


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Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

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Responsible Tourism Developments January 2019

  1. Kerala: the World's Leading Responsible Tourism Destination
  2. India Responsible Tourism Awards
  3. Taking Responsibility in Scotland
  4. Taking Action on Plastic
  5. Overtourism
  6. Cruising Pollutes
  7. Reputational Risk: the Orphanage Business
  8. How to be less of an ass travelling in 2019
  9. Pro-poor Tourism in China
  10. Peak Flying?

1.Kerala: the World's Leading Responsible Tourism Destination
Kerala has successfully addressed the challenge of overtourism by managing waste better and enabling the local community to benefit by securing additional incomes and employment. Responsible Tourism is now being rolled out across the whole state. Responsible Tourism is receiving very favourable coverage in the Indian broadsheets, for example, this month in The Hindu. Kerala made it to CNN's list of 19 places to viosit in 2019. Kerala is now using tourism for local development rather than being used by it. Kadakampally Surendran, Kerala’s Minister for Tourism, said recently “RT is indeed an achievement the government can be proud of. We have pledged our full support to the mission. RT has over 60,000 beneficiaries now. From just 198, there are currently 11,523 units under RT. These numbers are proof that RT is a successful model to follow…” There has been spectacular growth in Responsible Tourism in Kerala in the last twelve months and it is delivering. The leading RT destination in the world.

2. India Responsible Tourism Awards
There were over 250 applications in the five categories and there were many with a good chance of winning in the World Awards. Himalayan Ecotourism was the overall winner. The judges recognised the co-operative structure linked with a more internationally oriented marketing and management company, but with guaranteed profits for the staff owned co-operative as a model for tourism development which ensures local benefits and control, empowers local communities and provides a viable route to market as a model which could, and should, be replicated.

The judges recognised CGH Earth’s Spice Village as having made an Outstanding Contribution to the development and practice of Responsible Tourism and the Judges’ Award went to them. “Early adopters of Responsible Tourism they have created experiences that pay “homage to nature and engage closely with local people and their cultures.” They have proved that “less can be more and that true luxury is an experience rooted in simplicity and soul, transcending mere form and ostentation.”
All the winners, leaders in Responsible Tourism

3. Taking Responsibility in Scotland
There is a session on Taking Responsibility in the Scottish Tourism Alliance Conference in Glasgow on March 14th March. On 13th March there is a workshop on Place, Volume & Quality Experiences: Are Our Destinations Full?    
Across the world, through discussions and seminars with destination managers and marketers, national parks and National Trust properties, the industry in its broadest sense has begun to develop a “toolbox” of management and marketing strategies and interventions which will enable us to address the challenge of coping with success.
This highly interactive workshop will address the issues which participants bring to the session and offer a range of management approaches which have been developed to address the many causes and symptoms of overtourism.

4. Taking Action on Plastic
The BBC's Rip Off Britain series on Holidays included a piece on Travel Without Plastic's campaign against single use plastics. In Kerala Wayanad is planning to go plastic free. Meawhil;e the BBC's Reality Check has been looking at the environmental impacts of cotton, plastic and paper bags. As you might expect it is complicated - very complicated. More on the WTM Responsible Tourism Blog here.

5. Overtourism
Sagada Municipality in the mountains of the Philippines has introduced regulations to address overcrowding and visitor behaviour. Venice to introduce a day visit fee for cruise passengers and day trippers. Edinburgh is planning a Transient Visitor Levy (TVL), a £2 tourist tax capped at seven nights to relieve seasonal and festival workers who stay in Edinburgh for extended periods of time. It would apply to Airbnb. In Rome new regulations prohibiting access by coaches to the historic centre resulted in protests and 200 vehicles parked in the  Piazza Venezia blocking traffic. The Isle of Skye, Dubrovnik, Skelling Michael, Machu Picchu and Mallorca are all takeign steps to mamange the Instagram effect.

Unsurprisingly overtourism cases are often reported here.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/irresponsibletourism/

6. Cruising Pollutes
The Independent newspaper reported this month that 'Each day a cruise ship emits as much particulate matter as a million cars'  and that air quality on cruise ship deck 'worse than world's most polluted cities', More
Cruise Adviser reports that the idea of "sustainable luxury is growing, and the number of travellers wanting to “give back” to communities and the environment is only going to grow in 2019. The demand for responsible tourism is rife and cruise lines need to take this on board by implementing changes such as using advanced wastewater treatment systems, utilising environmentally friendly cleaning supplies, recycling, and donating items for reuse to reduce their negative footprint on the environment."

The keel of Ponant’s hybrid electric polar expedition vessel propelled by LNG, Le Commandant Charcot, has been laid at Vard shipyard in Tulcea, Romania. Its two tanks have a total capacity of 4,500 m3, allowing the ship to reach exceptional destinations such as the geographic North Pole and remote sites of the Antarctic continent including the Ross Sea, Charcot Island and Peter I Island.” more

7. Reputational Risk: the Orphanage Business
Hope and Homes for Children‘s report on File on 4 that 37% of children in homes experience violence or abuse many more suffer neglect and that they are 10 more times to be involved in prostitution. Do not discount the reputational damage which you may suffer if you are linked with paedophile activity. The case of a British Airways award-winning pilot way back in 2015 was covered again in the 2019 radio programme. More

The problem is widespread and pernicious. What can be done about it?

  • Stop sending volunteers to orphanages. There is a powerful video here
  • Do not organise visits to orphanages and discourage people – staff and clients – from donating to orphanages
  • Discourage your travellers from donating to orphanages and homes.

8. How to be less of an ass travelling in 2019
Travel blogger Adventurous Kate has written that the best thing the travel blogging community has done is raise awareness about elephant rides. "But the single worst thing the travel blogging community does is contribute to overtourism. And despite the emergency of overtourism, that doesn’t stop bloggers from continuously writing guides to Iceland, Bali, Barcelona, and other places that have already been covered to death and don’t need to encourage any additional tourism." There follows some good advice about how to travel better.

9. Pro-poor Tourism in China
The Agricultural Development Bank of China (ADBC) has launched 57 financing projects to promote pro-poor tourism, with an intention to issue loans of 41 billion yuan. more

10. Peak Flying?
The Economist reflecting on the likely "big stories" of 2019 has suggested that flights will be cheaper than ever. Low-cost long haul travel will take off this year because the new hubs in Beijing (Daxing) & Istanbul will drive down prices. The Economist is predicting that once the airlines have to start paying for offsets prices will rise. video

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Encounter Africa 

Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

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Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

You are receiving this email because you have been receiving RT News for some years or have subscribed online more recently. Your name and email address is kept securely by our agent and used only to send you a copy of RT News. We will never sell or give your mailing address to any other organisation. Every edition of RT News sent by email comes with an unsubscribe function so if at any time you wish to cease receiving RT News please unsubscribe. Our mailing list contains only your name and email address.

If you have any queries please email harold@haroldgoodwin.info

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD  #responsibletourism

Responsible Tourism Developments November 2018

1.  World Responsible Tourism Awards: Results 
2.  Modern Slavery Act  Includes Orphanages in Australia

3.  Travel Associations not adequately addressing animal cruelty 
4.  Greenhouse gas pollution is still growing - the sector needs to do much more.
5.  Kerala recognised for its RT work and extends its programme
6.  My Green Butler - engaging the tourist 
7.  Overtourism: the focus shifts to solutions

8.  Public Consultation in the UK on National Parks  - deadline 18th December 
9.  Suncream banned

10. Indigenous Tourism Conference in Canada in November 2019

If you have suggestions for topics for the WTM RT programme at any of the four shows or suggestions for panellists who have evidence of real success in reducing carbon, water or waste please email harold@haroldgoodwin.info  

1.  World Responsible Tourism Awards: 2018 Results

 

 

 

 

 

These awards are a centrepiece of WTM Responsible Tourism Day – the "biggest and best" Responsible Tourism event globally,  We are looking for practices and initiatives that will inspire others and that are replicable across the industry. Our ambition is to showcase great examples of Responsible Tourism in practice and to sue them to educate others, including consumers, about what can be achieved and to challenge others to do as well or better. We recognise that achieving sustainability requires both innovation and the application of the best practices across the business or destination. We are also keen to see businesses which can report their initiatives and document their impact, both increasing positive economic, social and environmental impacts and by reducing negatives ones. The 2019 Awards open in March.

The Overall Winner this year was Barcelona for its leadership in recognising and tackling Overtourism. To be a finalist in the World Responsible Tourism Awards is itself a major achievement. This year there were five categories and 18 finalists, 8 Golds, 5 Silvers and 5 "ones to watch" exciting initiatives which the judges recognised to have great potential.  Full details of the finalists and the judges' reasons.

The 2019 African Responsible Tourism Awards close for entries on 15 December: there are seven categories: resource management water or waste; sustainable event; habitat and/or species conservation; community benefit; an experience of culture or heritage; attraction and SDG reporting. Enter. 

2.  Modern Slavery Act  Includes Orphanages in Australia

Orphanage trafficking recognised as modern slavery By Australia a world first for a national government. Save the Children Australia’s child protection advocate Karen Flanagan explains: "We know children around the world are being exploited and removed from their families to feed the rising demand for orphanage tourism, even though the majority of these children have parents or family." Research has shown that children who grow up in orphanages experience attachment disorders, developmental delays and have difficulty in forming relationships in adulthood. ReThink Orphanages won the silver award at the World Responsible Tourism Awards, "Best for Communicating Responsible Tourism". more
TUI was the first major company to recognise the problem of child trafficking in orphanages and to add orphanages to their modern slavery statement. More

3.  Travel Associations not adequately addressing animal cruelty

At WTM London in November there was a panel on animal welfare Video which included the results of World Animal Protection funded research by Professor Xavier Font. Font reviewed 62 trade associations and found that only six were communicating anything about animal welfare to their members and that only two associations and one tourism standard-setting body had welfare guidelines as part of their sustainability programmes. These three were ABTA (UK’s largest travel association), the Dutch Association of Travel Agents and Tour Operators (ANVR) and Global Sustainable Tourism Council (GSTC). Only ANVR, is doing any monitoring of its members to check if they implement guidelines or not. No less than 16 associations in both their literature and on their websites featured promotional pictures of wild animals, in many cases being cruelly used to interact with, and entertain,  tourists. More

Meanwhile in South Africa following the recent Parliamentary Colloquium entitled "Captive Lion Breeding for Hunting in South Africa: Harming or Promoting the Conservation Image of the Country", the Parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Environment Affairs has released their report calling for a ban on captive lion breeding in South Africa. More

4. Greenhouse gas pollution is still growing - the sector needs to do much more

Image result for climate change

 

 

 

 

 

The next generation may never see the glory of coral reefs as sea temperatures rise. The IPCFC is reporting that major economies, including the US and the EU, are not fulfilling their pledges. We are well off track. The global average temperature for the first 10 months of 2018 was 0.98C above the levels of 1850-1900, according to five independently maintained global data sets. The IPCC stated last month that to keep to the 1.5C goal, governments would have to slash emissions of greenhouse gases by 45% by 2030. Speaking at the opening ceremony of United Nations-sponsored climate talks in Katowice, Poland the naturalist Sir David Attenborough has said climate change is humanity's greatest threat in thousands of years. "If we don't take action, the collapse of our civilisations and the extinction of much of the natural world is on the horizon." More

For the four WTM shows in 2019 we are looking for businesses which can demonstrate real reductions in greenhouse gas emissions email harold@haroldgoodwin.info 

5. Kerala recognised for its RT work and extends its programme

Kerala won three awards in the World Responsible Tourism Awards, Kumarakom, won Gold for Managing Success;  Fringe Ford, Wayanad won Gold for Wildlife and Coconut Lagoon won Silver for Local Economic Benefit. Kerala also won Gold for Responsible Tourism in the International Travel and Tourism Awards. The Kerala Tourism Minister. Kadakampally Surendran, has announced that PEPPER (the People's Participation for Participatory Planning and Empowerment through Responsible Tourism) initiative will be extended to 12 further areas this month. This follows the success of the first extension of Kerala's RT programme to 10 panchayats in the first phase of the extension from Kumarakom. More The state has 10,938 units working under Responsible Tourism Mission. Over 50,000 families enjoy the fruits of responsible tourism in the state. More

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"What sets Kerala apart is that as a destination Kerala looked at RT as a philosophy that everyone needed to embrace,” says Dr V Venu, Principal Secretary, Kerala Tourism, and the pioneering bureaucrat who introduced this as formal government policy. Its main tenet is the creation of better places to live in and better places for people to visit, combining in one stroke the goodness of development via tourism."  Jose Dominic of CGH Earth Hotels has pointed out that “The DNA of Kerala has been responsible tourism since the beginning. We are in a leadership position now and have received recognition in the category for economic benefit to the local community.” Rupesh Kumar, State Coordinator RT Mission and a man deserving of the laurels recalls a time when he was frustrated by the unethical and unscientific development that was taking place, prior to 2007. “We began an awareness campaign against such moves,” he says adding, “Kerala RT is no showcase activity. It is a real model that is touching people’s lives meaningfully.” Jose Dominic puts the success story in a nutshell. “The ‘red flag perception’ kept investors at bay from Kerala but small entrepreneurs and the government began highlighting the indigenous and the small. It became a feature of Kerala and it became world class. The credit goes to Kerala itself.”

6. My Green Butler - engaging the tourist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WTM, London's Consumer Travel Survey research revealed that  58% of respondents thought that both governments and the industry have responsibility for making tourism more sustainable. 22% said that the industry was responsible and 15% governments. A mere 5% felt that neither had responsibility. Whilst responsibility lies with businesses and government to provide sustainable holidays, the consumers need to purchase more sustainable products and to use them sustainably.

Dr Chris Warren conducted PhD research at Griffith University to determine how best to engage tourists to help hospitality become more sustainable and consequently invented My Green Butler. Engaging guests positively has the potential to save millions of kW of energy and litres of water without negatively affecting the guest’s stay. Warren has just secured a prestigious Banksia Sustainability Award in recognition of My Green Bulter's potential to make a difference in moving our society towards a more sustainable future.

7.  Overtourism: the focus shifts to solutions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So many places are now recognising that they have a problem with overtourism that the focus is shifting to solutions. WTM, London research revealed that in a poll of more than 1,000 UK holidaymakers, well over half (57%) do not think tourists should have to pay such taxes. However, when asked if the UK should follow suit, almost half (45%) agreed that a tourism tax should be imposed on the 40 million annual overseas visitors who come to the British Isles.

In Goa there has been an outcry against a tourism master plan drawn up by international consultants. “Is it tourism for Goa or Goa for tourism? Is tourism for the benefit of people of Goa or Goa’s people are for tourism?" More In the Philipines Tourism Secretary Bernadette Romulo-Puyat has said the government has received complaints about the sorry state of La Union, Baguio, Puerto Galera, Coron and Siargao. Puyat said a “major thrust” was needed in all parts of the country to prevent violations of environmental ordinances and laws. "We also have to look past the pressure to just appeasing the present but rather to see to it that the future is even better."

The Vatican is considering placing limits on museum visitors, tour guides report that at least 10 visitors per day are fainting in the crowds queuing for the Sistine Chapel.  The Dutch are hitting back at the crowds visiting the World Heritage windmills at Kinderdijk near Rotterdam. It is not Disneyland.    In Dublin the City Council has set aside €400,000 to fund a task force to police potentially illegal Airbnb-style rentals. In Australia as many as one in seven rental homes in Australia’s most popular inner-city and beachside suburbs are being removed from the long-term rental market and listed on the short-term letting site, according to an Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI) report that examined the effect of Airbnb in Sydney and Melbourne'. In Japan Kyoto is dispersing visitors spatially and temporally.

In New Zealand Stephen England-Hall, CEO of Tourism NZ, is arguing that “It’s more important to us to look after the overall needs and desires of New Zealanders than our visitors. We need to look at the risk of over tourism which is where visitor numbers can be overwhelming and that starts to create challenges for local residents or even problems for other visitors and tourism businesses. It's complicated, but what’s pretty powerful is that there's been a recognition by local government, central government and the tourism industry that we can learn and take a lot away from what's happening in other countries who have failed to take a proactive stance on this.”

At WTM, London leaders of tourism in four cities Amsterdam, Barcelona, London and New York were interviewed about the experience in their cities and about how they were managing it. The session is available to watch.

8.  Public Consultation in the UK on National Parks - deadline 18th December

There is mounting concern about the decline in wildlife and biodiversity in protected landscapes in the UK. Weakening or undermining the existing protections or geographic scope is not part of this review, which is instead focusing on how designated areas can boost wildlife, support the recovery of natural habitats and connect more people with nature. The call for evidence closes on 18 December. Evidence received will form part of the designated landscapes review, which will report back next year with recommendations.

9.  Suncream Banned

Pulau, the archipelago in the Pacific Ocean,  has announced that it is banning the import and sale of "reef-toxic"  sunscreens from 2020., under their  2018 Responsible Tourism Education Act. Hawaii in July banned the sale or distribution of sunscreen containing environmentally toxic chemicals. Hawaii's ban comes into force in 2021. Pulau has banned ten chemicals commonly found in sunscreen to protect lake life and corals. Palau's law also sets out that tour operators should provide customers with reusable alternatives to disposable plastic or polystyrene cups, plastic or polystyrene food containers, water bottles and drinking straws. These can either be reusable water dispenser and food containers or reusable individual containers or straws or "other means" .. not specified. More

10. Indigenous Tourism Conference in Canada in November 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Kelowna is to host an International Indigenous Tourism Conference in 2019The IITC is an annual conference bringing together people interested and invested in creating and contributing toward a growing Indigenous tourism industry in Canada and around the world. The ITAC reports that the demand for Indigenous tourism experiences was at an all-time high. The association’s targets for 2024 will see total Indigenous tourism revenues contributing $2.2 billion to the annual Canadian GDP, with 49,383 total jobs in Indigenous tourism and 200 export-ready Indigenous tourism experiences across Canada.


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Responsible Tourism Developments September 2018

1.  World Responsible Tourism Awards Finalists Announced 
2.  Managing Tourist Behaviour to Address Overtourism
3.  Have You Given In to Climate Change?
4.  Dick Smith exposes foreign booking sites taking advantage of the drought
5.  National Parks, Recreation and Biodiversity
6.  Chris Packham: A People's  Manifesto for Wildlife
7.  Tourism Concern closes 
8.  Seoul:  Efforts to Promote Sustainable Urban Tourism
9.  WARNING Child Protection, beware of what you post. 10. New Film ON OUR TERMS

1.   World Responsible Tourism Awards Finalists Announced
Leaders stand out from the crowd. When the Awards are presented at World Travel Market in London on World Responsible Tourism Day, Wednesday 7th November, at noon, Tanya Beckett will interview the Gold winners about what they have done, why and what they have achieved.   We’ll be asking about why it makes business sense to take responsibility. The judges have deliberated long and hard after reviewing all the applications, longlisting and then shortlisting, the finalists for this year’s World Responsible Tourism Awards have finally been decided. There were long debates amongst the judges on judging day about the merits of each application. The finalists are announced here. 

2.   Managing Tourist Behaviour to Address Overtourism

Back in February CNN named 12 destination travellers might want to avoid. Increasingly the focus is on the honeypots to avoid and local authorities are beginning to regulate behaviour. In Venice, the city council is introducing a host of regulations, permits for busking and sketching and fines for pausing on bridges leading to fines of between €25 and €500.  More  On Skye rebellious locals have destroyed more than 100 stone stacks created by tourists at the Fairy Glen, near Uig. More in The SundayTime

Jessica Loudis in a review article in The Nation Overtourism’ Is Driving Europeans Crazy" reminds us of Justice Potter Stewart’s famous definition of pornography—you know it when you see it.

Jessica Loudis in a review article in The Nation Overtourism’ Is Driving Europeans Crazy" reminds us of Justice Potter Stewart’s famous definition of pornography—you know it when you see it.

Last year Florence began to hose down church steps to deter tourists from picnicking there. Since 4th September eating in four streets has been banned. A bilingual sign, directing visitors to “respect residents, traders and workers of this street”, has been distributed for display by local businesses. More in the Independent.  In Andalusia, local authorities are working with the police and businesses to regulate and control the outrageous behaviour of the stag and hen parties which is no longer tolerated. More in El Pais

Have You Given In to Climate Change?

Kitchener

As this RT News is published the IPCC is meeting in South Korea to try to identify ways in which the rise in average global temperature can be kept below 1.5%. Leaked drafts of the new report suggest that global warming is on track to break the 1.5C mark by around 2040. More.  Climate Change is a real and present danger. Denial remains strong. In the UK the Advisory Committee on Climate Change says we are on track to miss legally binding targets, and that this looming failure is partly attributable to the government.  Three environmental activists were sentenced to between 15 and 16 months in jail for their part in a protest against fracking in Lancashire. The Guardian, in an editorial, argues that the actions of activists are a reason to hopeIn the USA the Trump administration accepts that there may be a 7F rise in global temperature by 2100. The Trump administration says human-caused climate change is inevitable, so environmental standards are pointless. Given Up

As Martin Lukacs argued in The Guardian last year  "Neoliberalism has conned us into fighting climate change as individuals" and urges us to stop obsessing with how personally green you live – and start collectively taking on corporate power. Climate Change will not be stopped by consumers, rather citizens need to act.

George Monbiot recognises "that challenging our least contested ideologies – growth and consumerism – is a tough call. But in New Zealand, it is beginning to happen. Jacinda Ardern, the Labour Prime Minister, says “it will no longer be good enough to say a policy is successful because it increases GDP if it also degrades the physical environment.” How this translates into policy, and whether her party will resolve its own contradictions, remains to be determined."  Deathly Silence

4.   Dick Smith exposes foreign booking sites taking advantage of the drought
Dick Smith is an Australian entrepreneur, businessman, record-breaking aviator, philanthropist is angry. Support the home team.

5.   National Parks, Recreation and Biodiversity
The 14th International Conference on Responsible Tourism in Destinations in Plymouth this month provided an opportunity for academics and protected are managers to address the challenges of overtourism in national parks and the inevitable conflicts that arise between biodiversity conservation and the political and economic imperative to grow recreational use and tourism. More

6.   Chris Packham: A People's  Manifesto for Wildlife
British naturalist Chris Packham et al published A People’s Manifesto for Wildlife this month. Our protected area system is not protecting our biodiversity.
‘Between 1970 and 2013, 56% of UK species declined. Of the nearly 8,000 species assessed using modern criteria, 15% are threatened with extinction. This suggests that we are among the most nature-depleted countries in the world. Of the 218 countries assessed for ‘biodiversity intactness’, the UK is ranked 189, a consequence of centuries of industrialisation, urbanisation
and overexploitation of our natural resources.’
“It’s time to wake up. We must rouse ourselves from this complacent stupor, because we are presiding over an ecological apocalypse and precipitating a
mass extinction in our own backyard. But – vitally – it is not too late. There is hope we can hold to, and there is action we can take.

7.   Tourism Concern closes
Tourism Concern has struggled financially for several years as donor and government funding has dried up. 2019 would have marked the 30th anniversary of an organisation which has done so much to point out that tourism is not a pollution-free industry, not entirely a blessing and to campaign to make tourism better. Others will continue to campaign but Tourism Concern will be sadly missed. Read more in The Guardian

8.   Seoul:  Efforts to Promote Sustainable Urban Tourism
Catherine Germier-Hamel writes in Sustainable Brands "Seoul has been striving to promote alternative forms of tourism that do not put pressure on destinations and offer quality experiences to citizens as well as visitors . Various landmarks in Seoul – for example, the villages of Ehwa and Bukchon in the central district of Jongno – have already suffered from excessive noise, traffic congestion and littering due to overcrowding. Due to its well-preserved Korean houses known as hanok, which date back to the Joseon dynasty (1392-1897), Bukchon village has become a key tourist attraction, receiving a daily average of 10,000 visitors, 70 percent of them foreign tourists. In the 2000s, Bukchon residents were encouraged to renovate their hanok through government support so that these traditional houses could be promoted as key sightseeing spots and even offer home stays. However, the locals quickly started to feel overwhelmed by the uncontrolled flows of tourists; according to an academic study released in 2017, the tourism boom in Bukchon contributed to a 14 percent decrease in the number of residents over the past five years."

9.   WARNING Child Protection, beware of what you post.
peopleandplaces have some invaluable advice in their latest newsletter. Sharing images of abuse, even when the goal is to question those images and promote best practice, could be a criminal offence in the letter of the law. The correction action is available here. 

10. A New Film from Responsible Travel: ON OUR TERMS
Not all tourism is overtourism. On Our Terms: A Story of Responsible Tourism tells how a landowning Maasai community in Kenya have welcomed tourists onto their land, offering a beautiful place to stay; Maasai-guided walking and driving safaris; and a real insight into their culture and way of life. Narrated by Derrick Nbaala, a Maasai guide, this story shows how a community can use tourism to their benefit, whilst offering a unique and unforgettable experience for the tourist too. Video

JOBS
Sustainable Tourism Lead South Downs National Parks Authority closing date 07 October

Responsible Travel: An Experiment in Business 

The WTM Monthly round-up

 

 

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Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

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From Helsinki to the Russian Border

by Harold Goodwin - Responsible Tourism Partnership

Last week I was in Finland, Helsinki, Jyväskylä and Base Camp near the Russian border, from the city to wilderness in four days. In Helsinki, we met with the city to discuss the challenge of sustainability. They have wisely separated the managing tourism function from marketing. More and more destinations are realising that mixing marketing and management in a DMO is fraught with difficulty. All tourism is managed by the local authority or national park; roads, litter, toilets, congestion, all have to be managed, and the DMOs are not good at that.

Then on to JAMK at Jyväskylä where I contribute to an international summer school programme on Responsible Tourism with students for India, Korea, Egypt and Finland. The focus of the student's work is on tourism development on and around Lake Päijänne which stretches from Lahti in the south over 100 km to  Jyväskylä in the north, a city which has grown from 8,000 inhabitants in 1940 to more than 130,000.  There is also time to meet with local tourism entrepreneurs and discuss how the city can best develop tourism in its rural hinterland.

Harmooni, part of the Arts & Crafts Restaurants Oy chain, brings local fish and game to the table with a menu that changes each month to include the best fresh stock from local vendors. Supper with the owner to talk about how they might extend their tourism offer by linking with the rural communities and food producers.

After class on Thursday Keijo Salenius of Basecamp Oulanka drove me north close to the Russian border and Oulanka National Park which has over 400 threatened species of flora and fauna. Live webcam Siberian taiga,  boreal or snow forest, reaches the European Union here in northern Finland. Basecamp Oulanka, on a lakeside opposite Juuma, provides a luxurious camp, a wilderness hotel,  base for access into Oulanka for walking, trekking, white water rafting, canoeing, Nordic walking, skiing, fatbikes, snowshoeing and climbing. I whitewater rafted on the River Kitka to the Russian border where Basecamp has a satellite smoke sauna camp within sight of Russia.

Outdoor activities are a core part of the offer, but Basecamp was created as an alternative to the highly mechanised 'urban' ski centre at Kuusamo with its snowmobiles and skiing infrastructure. Basecamp's rive groups stop off to fell a tree, as volunteers they contribute to restoring a meadow habitat beside the river.

I was not attracted by the rafting - I was motivated by the desire to see bears in the wild. I saw 5 different bears at the same time from a comfortable hide - next time I would stay the night. Wolves, Elk, Reindeer (come of them white),  Wolverine, Otters and Bears can all be seen with expert guides in the different seasons. This is an accessible wilderness. The corridor and protected area are most important to birds like the golden eagle, black grouse, capercaillies and owls. There is a bird list below.

Siberian flora and fauna come from the east along the River Oulanka, which runs to the White Sea via Lake Paanajärvi and Lake Pääjärvi through Russian forests. The microclimate is very strong with dry, warm summers and dry, cold winters. Paanajärvi National Park is very wild with a mere 5000 visitors annually, who mostly stay on the eastern side. The border is isolated on the Russian side with a 5km unauthorised approach zone.

Keijo Salenius

Source: Google maps 

In 2009 Basecamp Oulanka was included in the 4 best places in the world to see the Northern Lights Aurora Borealis: Being so close to Russian wilderness with a microclimate so cold and dry, there are very seldom clouds and no light pollution.

The WILD OULANKA FOUNDATION

Basecamp Oulanka is helping create The Oulanka Paanajarvi Corridor, between the Oulanka and Kuusinki rivers, a new private protected area of 1000 hectares (about 2 x 4 km) between Oulanka National Park (30 000 hectares) and Paanajärvi National Park (104 000 hectares with 100 000 hectare buffer zone). Echoing the Peace Parks concept in Southern Africa the two parks form an internationally unique wilderness area and an important destination for nature-based tourism. The close cooperation of both protected areas also helps foster better understanding between Finns and Russians on both sides of the border, as a role model for peaceful cooperation, and brings economies of scale financially and environmentally, working together for the common purpose of biodiversity conservation and sustainability while managing tourism responsibly under a joint management plan.

The landowner is Kuusamo Forests Common, a local cooperative with 4400 owner members. The cooperative area is over 94,000 hectares of land for the purpose of local income generation through forestry. The Wild Oulanka Foundation has signed a lease agreement with Kuusamo Forests Common for the coming 25 years for the corridor area. The foundation's annual budgeted of €160,000  covers the staff, making the nature trails, the financial loss to the cooperative and most of the hunting rights. Access to the border zone 453 hectares within the corridor area will be limited with voluntary agreements, under controls and patrols by the Finnish Border Guard. Clear signage, gates and barriers will be put in place, and visitors limited to 1000 annually.

In the words of The Long Run of which Base Camp Oulanka has been a member since 2015: "Basecamp Oulanka is a “positive footprint destination”, founded for conservation and wildlife experience purposes. The heating system used throughout the complex relies totally on nature using special wood pellets for fuel. Even the hot tub is run from an ingenious system that uses the excess heat generated from the sauna. When it comes to day to day life at Basecamp a very important feature is that manpower is always used over motors to minimise the carbon emissions. Basecamp also uses electric outboard engines for rafting boats resulting in zero fuel consumption. "

Basecamp Oulanka is a member of The Long Run Foundation. In 2011, Basecamp Oulanka was awarded VESTAS, the European sustainable tourism awards, as an “Outstanding example of sustainable and responsible tourism.” In 2014 they were awarded the GreenLeaders GOLD status by Trip Advisor.

http://basecampoulanka.fi/en/ 
www.facebook.com/basecampoulanka
www.youtube.com/basecampoulanka

Species

In the Oulanka Paanajarvi Corridor, the EU Habitats Directive protects 22 habitat types and the Nature Directive protects 53 species. Species on the EU Directive include (plus several secret species) include:

  • Ahma* - Gulo gulo
  • Ilves - Lynx lynx
  • Karhu - Ursus arctos
  • Saukko - Lutra lutra
  • Susi - Canis lupus
  • Kivisimppu - Cottus cobio
  • Havuhuppukuoriainen - Stephanopachys linearis
  • Jättisukeltaja - Dytiscus latissimus
  • Kalkkisiemenkotilo - Vertigo genesii
  • Lahokapo - Boros schneideri
  • Mäntyhuppukuoriainen - Stephanopachys subtriatus
  • Idänkynsimö - Draba cinerea
  • Isotorasammal - Cynodontium suecicum
  • Lapinleinikki - Ranunculus lapponicus
  • Lettorikko - Saxifraga hirculus
  • Myyränporras - Diplazium sibiricum
  • Pahtakeltto - Crepis tectorum
  • Pohjankellosammal - Encalypta mutica
  • Tunturiarho - Arenaria ciliata ssp. pseudofrigida
  • Kirjojokikorento - Ophiogompus cecilia
  • Isonuijasammal - Meesia longiseta
  • Korpikolva - Pytho kolwensis
  • Rusoharmoyökkönen - Xestia brunneopicta

Birds on the Directive include (plus several secret species):

  • Ampuhaukka - Falco columbarius
  • Helmipöllö - Aegolius funereus
  • Hiiripöllö - Surnia ulula
  • Huuhkaja - Bubo bubo
  • Kuikka - Gavia arctica
  • Kurki - Grus grus
  • Lapinpöllö - Strix nebulosa
  • Lapintiira - Sterna paradisaea
  • Laulujoutsen - Cygnus cygnus
  • Liro - Tringa glareola
  • Mehiläishaukka - Pernis apivorus
  • Metso - Tetrao urogallus
  • Palokärki - Dryocopus martius
  • Pikkusieppo - Ficedula parva
  • Pohjantikka - Picoides tridactylus
  • Pyy - Bonasa bonasia
  • Sinirinta - Luscinia svecica
  • Sinisuohaukka - Circus cyaneus
  • Suokukko - Philomachus pugnax  
  • Uivelo - Mergus albellus
  • Varpuspöllö - Glaucidium passerinum
  • Vesipääsky - Phalaropus lobatus

Responsible Tourism Developments April 2018

WTM 2016

1. World Responsible Tourism Awards Responsible Tourism Book Cover
2. Corporates acknowledging that they need to take responsibility
3. Overtourism 
4. Climate Change & Shipping
5. Consumers are demanding that businesses take responsibility
6. The World Responsible Tourism Awards family: Africa & India 
7. The regulators are catching up with platforms like Arbnb
8.  Plastic Pollution 
9.  Slum Tourism 

10. Messi new UNWTO Responsible Tourism Ambassador 

 

1. World Responsible Tourism Awards
The 2018 World Awards, now organised by WTM London, were launched on Earth Day ib Dubai. The Awards are now open and submissions can be made until 6th August - the judges can only choose form amongst those that that. Details and application forms.
WRTA 2018

2. Corporates acknowledging that they need to take responsibility
Responsible Tourism is becoming mainstream. senior figures in the industry are following TUI’s example and recognising their responsibility for ensuring that the sector is sustainable – it is in their enlightened self-interest, but it has taken a while for them to realise that the problems cannot be left to others to address. Carnival Corporation chief executive Arnold Donald has said that Travel industry leaders should “listen very carefully” to complaints of ‘over-tourism’ by local communities, acknowledging that Venice is “overrun” and that “a bit of regulation” would help. Gavin Tollman, chief executive officer of Trafalgar Tours,  “Each and every one of us has a duty to preserve destinations for future generations. As an executive in the travel industry, I firmly believe this awareness needs to be a basic component in how we run our businesses.” He went on to emphasise the importance of attracting the right type of tourists – people who understand, embrace and appreciate the places they visit, not those who travel to tick items off their bucket lists. He  argues that “Tourism needs to add to the economic long-term sustainability of the places we visit, it cannot simply be a drain on resource and local infrastructure with limited or no local contribution. More

3. Overtourism
It is the failure to take responsibility for sustainability that has resulted in the overtourism crisis. This month neighbourhood associations and activist groups from 14 southern European cities formed a network to join forces in their fight against mass tourism. Venice segregated visitors and locals to cope with the "assault of tourism".  Venice installed turnstiles and  The Daily Express in the UK asked "Is it safe to visit Venice amid anti-tourist street protests?" In Halong Bay a forum has been convened to address the challenge. Justin Francis of Responsible Travel has suggested ways in which travel agents can help their clients to avoid the problem.

4. Climate Change & Shipping
The latest Actuaries Climate Index™ (ACI), they are the people who insure the risks. “Sea levels, high temperatures, and heavy precipitation continue to be pronounced relative to
their historical norms, sustaining the long-term trend of high ACI values,” said Doug Collins, Chair of the Climate Index Working Group. The "elevated index value reflects continued deviation of climate and sea level extremes from historically expected patterns" for North America.

Shipping generates roughly the same quantity of greenhouse gas as Germany if it were accounted for as a nation, it would be the world's sixth biggest emitter.The Marshall Islands have the second largest number of registered. Like aviation it was omitted from  the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement.  David Paul, their environment minister, argued at the International Maritime Organisation, that he economic gains of protecting shipping would be "far outweighed" by the costs of failing to achieve the limits in temperature rise set out in the Paris Agreement. The IMO agreement is for a target for a 50%  reduction in emissions by 2050 compared to 2008 levels. The EU has launched a new satellite tasked with tracking dirty air, it has demonstrated how it will become a powerful tool to monitor emissions from shipping - including cruise liners. Meanwhile plans to grow large quantities of bio-fuels for aviation are being criticised for their large negative impacts on the environment and on food supply. 

5. Consumers are demanding that businesses take responsibility
Recent research published by TUI clearly shows that consumers expect the industry to take responsibility for ensuring that their product is sustainable. Research by booking.com found that 87% of global travellers say they want to travel sustainably, and nearly four in 10 (39%) say they often or always manage to do so. However, 48% said that they never, rarely or only sometimes manage to travel sustainably. As booking.com points out, this suggests “that while promising strides are being made for a greener future, there is still plenty of room to turn intentions into action.” Sustainability is the aspiration; this consumer aspiration is a commercial opportunity.

6. The World Responsible Tourism Awards family: Africa & India 

The India Responsible Tourism Awards - the winner and the judges' reasons. 
IRTA 2018

The Africa Responsible Tourism Awards: Overall Winner Wilderness Safaris and all the others  the judges' reasons. 

7. The regulators are catching up with platforms like Arbnb
Research by “Am Isterdam: Contested Spaces: Tourism versus Livability” into the  tensions which arise as mass tourism is rapidly becoming a contested issue, with residents and local neighbourhood associations frantically waving the ‘red flag'.The research asks, how have residents been experiencing and perceiving mass tourism in Amsterdam and how are they addressing it? Amisterdam. 

In Paris the city authorities are taking legal action against Airbnb (with 50,000 listings)  and two of its smaller competitors for allegedly failing to obey laws designed to limit the profusion of holiday rentals – and are seeking up to €43m a day in damages.  Last year, the authorities required that each rental have a unique registration number, to enable officials to enforce a law that prevents owners from letting to tourists for more than 120 nights a year. Paris says Airbnb is openly flouting this law, and wants damages of €1,000 a day for each of the 43,000 listings it claims are not properly registered.

8.  Plastic Pollution
A British diver has filmed a sea of rubbish off Bali. The video is shocking. A giant plastic 'berg has blocked an Indonesian river

plastic waste problem

Like other developing countries, Indonesia is wrestling with an acute plastic waste problem photo David Shukman

Britain may introduce a deposit scheme on plastic bottles. UK consumers use around 13 billion plastic drinks bottles a year of which more than three billion are not recycled..

9.  Slum Tourism
Slum tourism sparks considerable debate around an uncomfortable moral dilemma. No matter what you call it—slum tours, reality tours, adventure tourism, poverty tourism—many consider the practice little more than slack-jawed privileged people gawking at those less fortunate. Others argue they raise awareness and provide numerous examples of giving back to the local communities. Read more in National Geographic

One of the reasons that we travel is to experience other cultures, to encounter "the other", to understand and to share something of the other vicariously and briefly. Sometimes this is voyeuristic and exploitative. This resource page has been created to enable those who facilitate responsibly encounters with the other, whether for local, domestic or international visitors. Encountering the other

10. Messi new UNWTO Responsible Tourism Ambassador
The has been muttering of disapproval about Barcelona footballer Lionel Messi being appointed Ambassador for Responsible Tourism by the World Tourism Organisation. But as Justin Francis argues "perhaps it is hypocritical of us, then, to demand “perfect” representatives to promote responsible tourism. It is also incredibly counterproductive. Messi has unbelievable influence and reach, and his enthusiasm for promoting our cause can only help spread the message." more

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Responsible Tourism Developments March 2018

1. World Responsible Tourism Awards launch
2.Responsible Tourism at three WTM Travel Markets in April
3. Water Scarcity the "new normal"?
4. Thomas Cook launches “Make a Difference with Every Holiday.
5. TUI: ‘responsible tourism’ becomes part of mainstream holidaymaking rather than a ‘nice to have’ or niche travel concept.
6. Three-day workshop in The Gambia on Tourism Monitoring for the SDGs
7. New Guidelines on Sea Turtle Hatcheries 
8. Disintermediation: UK MPs press for regulation
9. Death of a species - the end of the northern white rhino Ceratotherium simum cottoni
10. Virtuoso commits to Sustainable Tourism
10. Virtuoso commits to Sustainable Tourism

1. World Responsible Tourism Awards
World Travel Market, London, has taken responsibility for organising the World Responsible Tourism Awards which ResponsibleTravel.com organised from 2004 to 2016. The 2018 World Responsible Tourism Awards will be launched on Earth Day, Sunday, April 22nd, at Arabian Travel Market in Dubai. Nominations open on April 22nd and close on 06 August. Categories: Wildlife; Employment Conditions; Local Economic Benefit, Communicating Responsible Tourism and Managing Success (overtourism). Please spread the word - only those who apply can be considered and recognised as “Leaders in Responsible Tourism”. More   

2. Responsible Tourism at three WTM Travel Markets in April
There are Responsible Tourism programmes at all three WTM shows in April. Details of the programme are online: WTM Latin America in Sao Paulo 3-5 April; WTM Africa 18-20 April in Cape Town; April 22-25 Arabian Travel Market in Dubai

3. Water Scarcity the "new normal"?
Cape Town has markedly reduced its daily consumption of water by about 50%, the city has imposed a limit of 50 litres of water per person per day. Day Zero has been pushed back to August. But water stress is likely to be the new normal with more reliance on hand-sanitizers, desalination and water pumped from aquifers. In 2015 in Sao Paulo some residents had their water cut off and in Mexico City "some neighbourhoods unable to access to a constant supply."  More More | World Water Day: Is it ethical to holiday in water-starved countries? 
The International Hotel Group has launched a partnership with the UK-based non-governmental organisation, The Rivers Trust to explore approaches to saving water and reducing water-related risks in IHG hotels 
The International Tourism Partnership has launched a new report on Water Stewardship | Six simple steps to embed water stewardship 

4.Thomas Cook launches “Make a Difference with Every Holiday.
Thomas Cook has just launched a new three-year sustainability strategy, promising to “Make a Difference with Every Holiday. Their ambition is to make a positive contribution to the destinations they feature and to reduce their environmental impacts in the UK, on the journey and in the destination. Peter Frankhauser announced two years ago that Thomas Cook was putting the customer back at the heart of the business and the new sustainability strategy is closely linked to the customer journey. More

5.TUI: ‘responsible tourism’ becomes part of mainstream holidaymaking rather than a ‘nice to have’ or niche travel concept.
Latest research from TUI reports that
> Nearly 50% of UK holidaymakers say ‘giving back’ to a holiday destination is important to them.
The issues most likely to attract support from British tourists are hunger and food safety (27%), animal welfare (26%), cultural heritage conservation (22%), education and lifelong learning opportunities (18%).
62% of UK holidaymakers agree it makes them feel better when they know their holiday was organised with respect to nature and the local community.
> Sampling local cuisine, visiting local markets and neighbourhoods, shopping for souvenirs and taking a tour with a local guide were all regarded by 50% or more of UK holidaymakers as desirable. More

6. Three-day workshop in The Gambia on Tourism Monitoring for the SDGs
The main objective is to bring stakeholders together to share and exchange experiences towards taking social, economic and environmental responsibility for sustainable tourism development and to decide on the tools to use to make an annual monitoring and evaluation of progress or the lack of it for better tourism. 24th -26th. April 2018 

7.New Guidelines on Sea Turtle Hatcheries
Responsible Travel has produced guidelines on responsible hatcheries and there are plenty of problems.  "A hatchery should never be established as the main method of conservation. It should be a last resort – and even then, it should be used alongside other conservation measures. Hatcheries require extensive labour and funds to be successful and are not a long-term solution. Beach patrols, clear demarcation of nests and protective fencing are better options, if possible. And of course, if poaching is the key issue, education, campaigning and creating other sources of income for local people are essential to ensure the turtles’ long-term survival." More

8. Disintermediation: UK MPs press for regulation
The All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for tourism and hospitality published an interim report on their findings of an inquiry into the sharing economy on 21st March. They have concluded that there is evidence that businesses on disintermediated platforms are not compliant with regulations to keep visitors safe and that sharing economy customers are potentially less protected. Chair of the committee Gordon Marsden, MP for Blackpool, said: "We support diversity and choice in the market, but it’s important to ensure new distribution models are held to the same standards as older [businesses]."  “It is important that growth is not at the expense of health and safety, consumer standards and maintenance of a level playing field." He added "There is increasing evidence of professional operators using platforms as a low-cost route to market. An increasing number of listed properties [on these platforms] are commercial in nature.” He went on to argue that if “It is proposed that it is not necessary to regulate the sharing economy. [But] if that is the case, the government should deregulate the B&B sector.” More & more

9. Death of a species - the end of the northern white rhino Ceratotherium simum cottoni
The world's last surviving male northern white rhino has died after months of poor health at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, age-related complications were causing suffering. More

10. Virtuoso commits to Sustainable Tourism
Virtuoso has released a white paper, "Sustainable Tourism: From Trend to Transformative Movement. Virtuoso has called for sustainability success stories and best practice that would be easily available for Virtuoso-affiliated travel advisers to use in crafting itineraries for trips that give back to local people and the planet. More

 

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Other Responsible Tourism Newsletters

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Subscribe to WTM’s RT Update here 

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Responsible Tourism News is a newsletter of record carrying the 10 most important Responsible Tourism stories of the month. 8,000 people subscribe to receive it every month.  Please forward to those you think may be interested – you can subscribe using the box on the right. If you wish to contribute a story email harold@haroldgoodwin.info or post it on our RTNews Facebook page.

Harold Goodwin’s Responsible Tourism Blog
Harold Goodwin blogs regularly on the  WTM Responsible Tourism Blog
Twitter: @goodwinhj  & @WTM_WRTD  #responsibletourism

 

News from Bwindi: September – October 2017

Progress and momentum continue to pick up speed and deepen impact – making an economic difference to those living around areas of tourist activity and bringing new optimism to those who have, ‘til now, not had any real attention to action any identified opportunity.

The lady weavers

Both Evelyn, at Ride-4-a-Woman and Tina, at Change-a-life-Bwindi, have been excited by some ‘out-of-the-blue’ sales that would not have happened, they say, with the ‘old’ baskets.

Tina has been making sure that the new Rusharara baskets are highly visible, not only in her shop & coffee bar/restaurant but also in a prominent place in a nearby lodge. In September she was approached by an investor, from Kampala, who had seen the baskets and is building a new lodge in Ruhija, Agandi Uganda Lodge, to place an order. Fifty was the order - 25 waste paper baskets and 25 laundry baskets. Too big an order for her ladies to handle – so a sub-contract was in order. The leader of the Rushaga south side ladies group, Karadonia Kayalisiima, the same one whose quality control photo is in the August update, was asked to pick up the contract. Very happy ladies.

Evelyn has been on the ‘war path’ for quality control. Ladies who follow the training and come with ‘perfect’ baskets are rewarded with additional ‘free’ grass and other materials and those who choose colours not in the approved range – are rejected.

Now that the ladies have up-skilled dramatically and found new enthusiasm for their craft, both are experimenting with harnessing the new design and quality skills to create new product – both in tableware; Tina with shallow oval bread baskets and Evelyn and her Manager, Angela, with rectangular table mats and square coasters. Anything not round is extremely difficult – so the challenge is on. A number of lodges have said they would seriously consider buying from any of the three ladies when their renew cycle comes around.

Lodges and buying local

At both south side lodges and Buhoma lodges small cadres of managers; three on the south side of the forest at Rushaga and Rubuguri and four from Buhoma, have recommitted to buying more local; woven products, display shelving, fresh produce.

Fresh produce is a work in progress as it relies on the producers not only gaining technical agronomy & horticultural skills but also market access education and linking to the lodge buyers. The Buhoma Community Development Association Chairman, Richard Ngabirano, has committed to helping with the latter.

Mobilising the Agronomist - Growing the right produce better and delivering quality and quantity – consistently

The newly contracted agronomist, Honest Tumuheirwe, has made her first scoping visit to the five focal points of our support: the Rubugiri ex-poachers; the Mutwa lady and her fellow Batwa in Rushaga; a group of women whom have been given 6ha of land by the river at Buhoma; the fish, mushroom and vegetable grower in Buhoma and, in Ruhija, assessment of the potential to grow a cash crop – potentially passionfruit that is in exceptional demand for fresh morning juice – all over Uganda.

Lodge managers who have formed their cadres have begun working very closely with Honest to evolve their preferred list and will continue to do so as the coming months flow.

Honest is not only a farmer in her own right but also the District Agricultural Officer – with 20 years experience. This expert link is a very positive move as it links directly to local authority and their remit and underpins both ongoing support; seeds for example, and sustainability.

The honey story gains momentum

Two very positive events mark progress in this integrally important component of the livelihood change process.

Honey shop – Brian Mugisha, of Golden Bees, has become so excited by the prospects for developing higher volumes of high quality, forest, honey that he has invested in the village of Rubuguri and opened the Honey Shop and Craft Corner, for a south side outlet. All 40 or so households are informal ‘shareholders’ in the business in that they not only are paid higher for the raw product but also are given ongoing skills training as a ‘free’ service from Golden Bees.

 

 

As a result of this increase in activity, attention to it has been drawn by the Food & Agricultural Organisation (FAO) – an autonomous unit of United Nations. This attention took a major move forward in Kampala in the last week of October when the RTP Associate and Brian Mugisha were called in to FAO and asked how they may support. Plans are underway for FAO & Golden Bees to work with the Ministry of Agriculture and develop a concept note looking for funding through the FAO discretionary funding streams. The plan is to obtain funding to bring value-add, and additional up-skilling training, to the honey collection centre, at Rubuguri, whereby processing, bottling, labelling, packaging and distribution can happen locally. Impact on SME development, job creation and extended household income can be very large.

Advanced Site Guide and Bird Guide Training

Plans are advanced to ensure that the three trails, outlined in the August update, have newly skilled and advanced guiding – to deliver the quality experience that is, by common consent among UWA Tourism Wardens, lodge managers and tour operators, sadly lacking.

A 6 day, intensive, advanced skills programme has evolved in collaboration with two of the country’s top trainers and USAGA officials. This programme will be offered to the top six guides who have exhibited proactive commitment and enthusiasm to better themselves and their small business and should be completed by the end of 2017 – ready to be programmed for 2018 season.

 

Peter Nizette